Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobosquirrel
IN THE NEWS

Robosquirrel

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 5, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Well, now we've seen it all: Scientists from UC Davis and San Diego State University have released a video of a venomous rattlesnake attacking a robotic squirrel. And we thought robojelly, the robotic jellyfish was weird. The video was made by Rulon Clark , a biology professor at San Diego State who is trying to determine how squirrels and rattlesnakes communicate in the wild. When a squirrel thinks a rattlesnake is nearby, rather than running away, it will raise its tail, heat it up, and wag it. Scientists call this "flagging behavior.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 5, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Well, now we've seen it all: Scientists from UC Davis and San Diego State University have released a video of a venomous rattlesnake attacking a robotic squirrel. And we thought robojelly, the robotic jellyfish was weird. The video was made by Rulon Clark , a biology professor at San Diego State who is trying to determine how squirrels and rattlesnakes communicate in the wild. When a squirrel thinks a rattlesnake is nearby, rather than running away, it will raise its tail, heat it up, and wag it. Scientists call this "flagging behavior.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
April 5, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
Google has asked for feedback about its concept-stage augmented-reality specs Project Glass.  And the company is getting it. Much of it is admiring; some of it is definitely not. Henry Blodget of Business Times tweeted of the headgear: "Ridiculous toy that shows Google is rapidly becoming Microsoft. " "Has anyone asked Google whether the Project Glass video post-production simply missed a deadline of April 1?" (David Chartier). The Glass eyewear would project info graphics in pop-ups on a small screen a few inches from the wearer's right eye.  The gear might incorporate motion-sensing capability, GPS location services, 3G or 4G wireless connections and Google Goggles' augmented-reality software.  Or it might not. It's all apparently very much up in the air -- the unveiling of the project Wednesday made it clear that this was an effort to find out what people thought and what they wanted.
SCIENCE
August 18, 2007 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Confronted by a hungry rattlesnake, a California ground squirrel chucks pebbles and dirt at its enemy and menacingly waves its tail. Then it really turns on the heat. Using infrared cameras, scientists at UC Davis have found that ground squirrels warmed their tails as much as 12 degrees to silently warn rattlesnakes, which can detect the tiniest of temperature changes.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
video platform video management video solutions video player Samantha Brick has discovered that when you write about your own good looks, people will not react well. The backlash from her Daily Mail column, "There Are Downsides to Looking This Pretty," has gone viral.  And this week, the British woman spoke about the evidence of the vitriol on ABC's "Good Morning America" -- "the thousands of vile messages I've had on Twitter, the thousands of vile emails I've had to my personal account, the messages I've had on my own answerphone.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|