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Robotic Arm

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SCIENCE
May 16, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
After years of work with primates and able-bodied humans, researchers have successfully demonstrated in paralyzed humans that an implanted electrode in the brain can successfully control the movement of a robot arm, allowing the patients to drink and perform other functions for the first time since they were disabled. One female patient who had been a quadriplegic for 15 years was able to bring a cup of coffee to her mouth and sip it through a straw for the first time since she was disabled by a stroke.
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BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
After performing a series of delicate maneuvers above the Earth, SpaceX's cone-shaped Dragon capsule moved in Wednesday for a historic docking with the International Space Station. Hawthorne-based Space Exploration Technologies Corp., better known as SpaceX, is on track to become the first private company to resupply the space station on a contracted mission for NASA. At about 3:56 a.m. PDT, the crew aboard the space station used its robotic arm to grab the Dragon as it floated outside.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Computer Motion Inc. on Monday said it won U.S. regulatory approval for a voice-activated robotic arm used in minimally invasive heart surgery, sending the company's shares up 45%. The robotic arm controls a specially designed tube linked to a camera that allows a surgeon to see what's happening during a heart operation on a monitor without having to crack open the patient's chest.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft was successfully launched Sunday, and by Wednesday morning the International Space Station crew should be greeting it with open arms. NASA's Sunita Williams, ISS commander, and Japanese colleague Aki Hoshide will stretch out the station's robotic arm to install the Dragon on Wednesday at 4:22 a.m. (7:22 a.m. Eastern), according to NASA.  The Dragon will be attached to the station for 18 days before heading back to Earth, splashing down in the Pacific off Southern California.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Using only its brainpower, a monkey can direct a robotic arm to pluck a marshmallow from a skewer and stuff it into its mouth, U.S. researchers said. Andrew Schwartz of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, whose study will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Nature, said the technology behind this feat may lead to brain-powered prosthetic limbs for people with spinal cord injuries or disabling diseases that make such simple tasks impossible. Until now, such brain-machine interfaces have been used to control cursor movements on a computer screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1999
In a discovery that may have implications for developing human prosthetic devices, researchers have found that rats can learn to control a robotic arm using electrodes implanted in their brains. According to researchers from the Hahnemann Medical College and Duke University, the rats were originally trained to get drinks of water by pressing a lever that activated the robotic arm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1994 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Teresa Radlinska was rolled into Operating Room 3 on the day before Thanksgiving, she knew that a robot would be part of the medical team removing her gall bladder. But she didn't worry about a non-human assistant probing around inside her body, because its precise maneuvers meant she would be out of surgery in only 25 minutes and home in time for Thanksgiving dinner.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2011 | Andrew Zajac
Responding to the needs of badly wounded war veterans, federal officials said Tuesday they were accelerating reviews of a science-fiction-like robotic arm controlled by a computer chip on the brain. The device would make the use of prosthetic arms, hands and fingers seem almost natural by using a microchip implanted on the brain to record and decode signals to neurons that control the prosthesis. In a dramatic video accompanying the announcement by the Food and Drug Administration, the prosthetic arm wielded pliers and picked up a clothespin to demonstrate its dexterity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2005 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't exactly "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines." For the first time, robotic arms powered with plastic muscles took on a human competitor Monday. The 17-year-old high school student who described herself as a "weakling" beat all three robot arms handily. "I was hoping we could have a win, but that didn't happen," said Yoseph Bar-Cohen, an expert on responsive plastics who organized the challenge. "We need to do a little more homework."
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
It was Canada's biggest day ever in space: The first Canadian spacewalker helped hook up the new Canadian-built robotic arm on the international space station Alpha. The 58-foot, 3,600-pound arm remained bent at the elbow and was to be extended today by crew inside the space station. The arm will serve as a high-tech construction crane, designed to move across the space station like an inchworm and perform chores wherever needed.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
When Curiosity went to Mars, it took a penny along with it. The coin -- a 1909 Lincoln penny -- was a nod to geologists' habit of using a penny in photos of rocks to provide an idea of the object's size. That penny, embedded in the rover, is now coated in the dust of Mars. Rather than provide scale, however, the coin was used on this expedition to help calibrate the Curiosity's camera. "We've just spent a week testing out our 7-foot robotic arm and the camera and spectrometer it holds," Ashwin Vasavada, deputy project scientist for Curiosity, told the Los Angeles Times in an interview Tuesday morning.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
It's only been there for a month, but Curiosity has already left its mark on Mars. On Thursday NASA released a photo that shows tracks made by the car-sized rover on the surface of the Red Planet. The rover is the shiny, light reflecting square in the right portion of the picture; the tracks are the double lines trailing behind it.   Curiosity is also responsible for the two dark marks in the center of the photo, NASA explained in a statement : They were formed when the rover landed and blew the red dust that covers much of the planet away, revealing the darker basaltic sand underneath.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
In what may be the first test drive that doesn't require bringing the vehicle back to the dealership, NASA's Curiosity on Wednesday will take a little spin on Mars. It's only a few measly feet, but the test drive will go a long way toward making sure the rover's parts are in working order for its Martian mission. A sequence of images from NASA (above) illustrate the "wheel wiggle" -- among the health checks the rover has been undergoing since landing on the Red Planet on Aug. 5. "On Wednesday the plan is to drive forward, turn right and back into a location currently in front, and left, of the rover," Ashwin Vasavada, deputy project manager for Mars Curiosity, told the Los Angeles Times in an interview Tuesday.
SCIENCE
May 16, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
After years of work with primates and able-bodied humans, researchers have successfully demonstrated in paralyzed humans that an implanted electrode in the brain can successfully control the movement of a robot arm, allowing the patients to drink and perform other functions for the first time since they were disabled. One female patient who had been a quadriplegic for 15 years was able to bring a cup of coffee to her mouth and sip it through a straw for the first time since she was disabled by a stroke.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2011 | Andrew Zajac
Responding to the needs of badly wounded war veterans, federal officials said Tuesday they were accelerating reviews of a science-fiction-like robotic arm controlled by a computer chip on the brain. The device would make the use of prosthetic arms, hands and fingers seem almost natural by using a microchip implanted on the brain to record and decode signals to neurons that control the prosthesis. In a dramatic video accompanying the announcement by the Food and Drug Administration, the prosthetic arm wielded pliers and picked up a clothespin to demonstrate its dexterity.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Using only its brainpower, a monkey can direct a robotic arm to pluck a marshmallow from a skewer and stuff it into its mouth, U.S. researchers said. Andrew Schwartz of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, whose study will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Nature, said the technology behind this feat may lead to brain-powered prosthetic limbs for people with spinal cord injuries or disabling diseases that make such simple tasks impossible. Until now, such brain-machine interfaces have been used to control cursor movements on a computer screen.
NEWS
April 16, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Working like clumsy surgeons wearing backpacks and mittens, two astronauts ventured outside the cabin of the space shuttle Discovery today and strapped two homemade snares to the tip of the craft's robotic arm in hopes of saving an $80-million satellite. The three-hour, unrehearsed space walk paved the way for a real surgeon aboard the Discovery, Dr.
NEWS
April 21, 1985 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
The world's first robot-assisted operation on a human has been successfully completed at Memorial Medical Center here in a medical breakthrough that hospital officials say will make surgery faster, safer and more accurate. On April 11, a team composed of a neurosurgeon, an engineer and a computer-operated robotic arm performed a biopsy on a 52-year-old Orange County man who has three malignant brain tumors, Memorial officials revealed Wednesday.
SCIENCE
May 28, 2008 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Prospecting near Mars' north pole was set back at least a day Tuesday when a communications link to NASA's Phoenix lander, nestled into a wide, undulating expanse nicknamed Green Valley, was interrupted by what spacecraft operators called a "transient event." The event, caused by a cosmic ray or some other high-energy particle, knocked out the UHF radio on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, one of two NASA spacecraft circling Mars that relay computer commands between Phoenix and Earth.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2008 | From Reuters
A pair of space shuttle astronauts floated outside the International Space Station late Saturday to assemble a mechanical maintenance man while crewmates set up equipment inside the first piece of Japan's newly arrived space laboratory. Veteran astronaut Richard Linnehan and rookie partner Michael Foreman left the station's airlock to begin the second of five spacewalks planned during the Endeavour's 16-day spaceflight. "Wow, what an awesome view," said Foreman, making his first spacewalk more than 200 miles over China.
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