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Robyn Astaire

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1994 | JUDY BRENNAN
Some of the most moving segments of "That's Entertainment! III" involve the liquid dancing and mischievous percussion playing of the incomparable Fred Astaire, one of the huge stars in MGM's stable during its golden years and celebrated in the new film.
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NEWS
March 17, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many believed Robyn Astaire's crusade to control use of her dead husband Fred's image ended last October with a U.S. Supreme Court rejection of her lawsuit involving a dance video. But they don't know Astaire. On Tuesday, the former jockey brought her cause--to protect deceased celebrities' images--to Sacramento, where she has persuaded some legislators to join her fight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1997
Is Robyn Astaire protecting the memory of her revered husband or cashing in on it? A rare interview with Fred Astaire's widow. * What kind of a summer has it been for movies? Jack Mathews and Kenneth Turan face off. * Americans have a problem with Oasis' battling Gallagher brothers. * Is "George Wallace" biased?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has ruled that Fred Astaire's widow cannot control his likeness in film clips if they are included as part of the content of an instructional videotape or documentary. The ruling, published Friday by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, upholds an earlier decision by the same panel last year on an issue that has been closely watched throughout the Hollywood film industry. By a 2-1 vote, appellate justices denied Robyn Astaire's request for a rehearing on the matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1994
Regarding "The American Way . . . That's Litigation!" (Film Clips, April 24): I was appalled that Robyn Astaire is charging to show clips from Fred Astaire's movies; how rich does one have to get? I understand he left her millions. Fred & Ginger movies are part of our American heritage; they are part of movie history. You'd think she'd be proud to lend out clips from his movies so that many more people in the world can be enriched to see Fred & Ginger dancing, like only they could do. I can't believe Fred would have wanted it this way!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1998 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court has ruled that Fred Astaire's widow cannot control his likeness in film clips if they are included as part of the content of an instructional videotape or documentary. The ruling, published Friday by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, upholds an earlier decision by the same panel last year on an issue that has been closely watched throughout the Hollywood film industry. By a 2-1 vote, appellate justices denied Robyn Astaire's request for a rehearing on the matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997
In general, I applaud anyone who tries to avoid cheapening the image of a film icon. It's a little harder to applaud the person who allowed Fred Astaire to be made into a shill for vacuum cleaners ("Fred Is Her Co-Pilot," by Irene Lacher, Aug. 17). But what's most shocking about Robyn Astaire is her attitude toward people who seek to use Fred Astaire's image in the most common and respectful way: by using clips from the films that made him famous. To refuse George Stevens Jr.'s request to use Fred Astaire's image in a Kennedy Center tribute to Ginger Rogers is mean-spirited, but to demand $70,000, as Stevens says she did, is shocking.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | Irene Lacher
Robyn Smith Astaire was always a woman without a past, so for years she invented one, she says. There was something about mounting her first horse at 2 on the family ranch. Majoring in English at Stanford. A starlet's contract with MGM. "I dissemble a little bit, I like to say," she says. She was enrolled at Columbia Pictures' acting workshop 30 years ago, and even then there were people who were optimistic about her future.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many believed Robyn Astaire's crusade to control use of her dead husband Fred's image ended last October with a U.S. Supreme Court rejection of her lawsuit involving a dance video. But they don't know Astaire. On Tuesday, the former jockey brought her cause--to protect deceased celebrities' images--to Sacramento, where she has persuaded some legislators to join her fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1997
In general, I applaud anyone who tries to avoid cheapening the image of a film icon. It's a little harder to applaud the person who allowed Fred Astaire to be made into a shill for vacuum cleaners ("Fred Is Her Co-Pilot," by Irene Lacher, Aug. 17). But what's most shocking about Robyn Astaire is her attitude toward people who seek to use Fred Astaire's image in the most common and respectful way: by using clips from the films that made him famous. To refuse George Stevens Jr.'s request to use Fred Astaire's image in a Kennedy Center tribute to Ginger Rogers is mean-spirited, but to demand $70,000, as Stevens says she did, is shocking.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | Irene Lacher, Irene Lacher is a Times staff writer
A cultural icon's place in the public's heart is much like a politician's: He belongs to everyone and everyone acts as though they've elected him to Olympus. That's true for no one more than Fred Astaire, the American god of an American art form, the smooth soft shoe. Long after the curtain fell on his career, his audience remains as devoted as any fervent constituents. And when people think you're messing with their legends, watch out.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | Irene Lacher
Robyn Smith Astaire was always a woman without a past, so for years she invented one, she says. There was something about mounting her first horse at 2 on the family ranch. Majoring in English at Stanford. A starlet's contract with MGM. "I dissemble a little bit, I like to say," she says. She was enrolled at Columbia Pictures' acting workshop 30 years ago, and even then there were people who were optimistic about her future.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1997
Is Robyn Astaire protecting the memory of her revered husband or cashing in on it? A rare interview with Fred Astaire's widow. * What kind of a summer has it been for movies? Jack Mathews and Kenneth Turan face off. * Americans have a problem with Oasis' battling Gallagher brothers. * Is "George Wallace" biased?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1994
Regarding "The American Way . . . That's Litigation!" (Film Clips, April 24): I was appalled that Robyn Astaire is charging to show clips from Fred Astaire's movies; how rich does one have to get? I understand he left her millions. Fred & Ginger movies are part of our American heritage; they are part of movie history. You'd think she'd be proud to lend out clips from his movies so that many more people in the world can be enriched to see Fred & Ginger dancing, like only they could do. I can't believe Fred would have wanted it this way!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1994 | JUDY BRENNAN
Some of the most moving segments of "That's Entertainment! III" involve the liquid dancing and mischievous percussion playing of the incomparable Fred Astaire, one of the huge stars in MGM's stable during its golden years and celebrated in the new film.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | Irene Lacher, Irene Lacher is a Times staff writer
A cultural icon's place in the public's heart is much like a politician's: He belongs to everyone and everyone acts as though they've elected him to Olympus. That's true for no one more than Fred Astaire, the American god of an American art form, the smooth soft shoe. Long after the curtain fell on his career, his audience remains as devoted as any fervent constituents. And when people think you're messing with their legends, watch out.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1998 | Associated Press
Fred Astaire's widow lost a U.S. Supreme Court appeal, ending her lawsuit alleging the unauthorized use of her famous husband's image in a dance-instruction videotape. The justices, without comment, left intact a federal appeals court ruling that threw out Robyn Astaire's case against New York-based Best Film & Video Corp. Her appeal argued that the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals should have sent the case, based on an interpretation of California law, to the state's Supreme Court.
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