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BUSINESS
October 18, 1998
I was aghast at the comment by analyst Robert Wasserman, and represented by Barbara Marsh in her article Oct. 6, that four pharmaceuticals acquired by ICN Pharmaceuticals from Roche Holdings are "a bunch of crap." I seriously doubt whether the patients worldwide who rely on these pharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancer, epilepsy, gastrointestinal ailments and serious sleep disorders would agree with that assessment. The opinion of one of the physicians who regularly prescribe these valuable pharmaceuticals surely would have been more valid than that of someone whose field of expertise is financial analysis.
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BUSINESS
November 14, 2010 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: I have heard many good things about Roche Holding. Is it a good investment in light of the new healthcare law? Answer: This Swiss pharmaceutical firm has lost some investment luster. The company has an array of cancer-fighting biotechnology drugs, but its once-robust sales growth has been slowing, the threat of cheaper generic drugs is growing, and the company has suffered setbacks in drug development. To improve its outlook, the company is turning to cost-cutting, with staff reductions expected in a number of markets.
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BUSINESS
February 6, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche Holding agreed to acquire Tastemaker, an international manufacturer of food flavorings, from two U.S. chemical companies in a deal worth about $1.1 billion. St. Louis-based Mallinckrodt Inc., which also makes drugs and other medical products, and Hercules Inc. of Wilmington, Del., each said they expect to net $550 million from the transaction.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Swiss drug company Roche Holding AG agreed to swap a stake in ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. for 8.7% of an ICN unit with rights to a top-selling hepatitis C drug, ICN said Thursday. The transaction gives Roche a stake in the division known as Ribapharm, which controls the drug ribavirin and an early version of its potential successor. Roche has an option to raise its Ribapharm stake to 17.5% by buying more ICN shares and then converting them, ICN said.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2010 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: I have heard many good things about Roche Holding. Is it a good investment in light of the new healthcare law? Answer: This Swiss pharmaceutical firm has lost some investment luster. The company has an array of cancer-fighting biotechnology drugs, but its once-robust sales growth has been slowing, the threat of cheaper generic drugs is growing, and the company has suffered setbacks in drug development. To improve its outlook, the company is turning to cost-cutting, with staff reductions expected in a number of markets.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
In Europe, share prices come in all sizes, and in many cases that means too big to buy for the individual investor. Shares with the highest price hurdles are in Switzerland, where wealthy families and commercial banks account for no less than half of all stock ownership. Food maker Nestle SA's shares, for example, sell for 1,174 francs, or $1,024. Across Europe, shares of household names sell for prices that hamper their popularity with the everyday Francois on the street.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Swiss drug company Roche Holding AG agreed to swap a stake in ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. for 8.7% of an ICN unit with rights to a top-selling hepatitis C drug, ICN said Thursday. The transaction gives Roche a stake in the division known as Ribapharm, which controls the drug ribavirin and an early version of its potential successor. Roche has an option to raise its Ribapharm stake to 17.5% by buying more ICN shares and then converting them, ICN said.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1991
G. Kirk Raab and several other executives at San Francisco-based Genentech won big when the company merged with Roche Holdings last year. When Roche bought 60% of Genentech's stock, it also purchased unexercised stock options from executives. Raab earned $6.3 million on the deal. Robert Swanson, also of Genentech, got $4.5 million for not exercising his stock options.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1998
I was aghast at the comment by analyst Robert Wasserman, and represented by Barbara Marsh in her article Oct. 6, that four pharmaceuticals acquired by ICN Pharmaceuticals from Roche Holdings are "a bunch of crap." I seriously doubt whether the patients worldwide who rely on these pharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancer, epilepsy, gastrointestinal ailments and serious sleep disorders would agree with that assessment. The opinion of one of the physicians who regularly prescribe these valuable pharmaceuticals surely would have been more valid than that of someone whose field of expertise is financial analysis.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche Holding agreed to acquire Tastemaker, an international manufacturer of food flavorings, from two U.S. chemical companies in a deal worth about $1.1 billion. St. Louis-based Mallinckrodt Inc., which also makes drugs and other medical products, and Hercules Inc. of Wilmington, Del., each said they expect to net $550 million from the transaction.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
In Europe, share prices come in all sizes, and in many cases that means too big to buy for the individual investor. Shares with the highest price hurdles are in Switzerland, where wealthy families and commercial banks account for no less than half of all stock ownership. Food maker Nestle SA's shares, for example, sell for 1,174 francs, or $1,024. Across Europe, shares of household names sell for prices that hamper their popularity with the everyday Francois on the street.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Genentech Extends Buy Option: The company said it extended for four years pharmaceutical maker Roche Holdings' option to buy the rest of the biotech company. Basel, Switzerland-based Roche, which already owns 66% of Genentech Inc., gains the right to buy the firm's remaining stock at a price that will increase quarterly up to $82 a share. Roche, which purchased 60% of South San Francisco-based Genentech in 1990, will continue to have two of 13 seats on Genentech's board.
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