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Rochelle Majer Krich

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NEWS
December 16, 1994 | ROBERT EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Why, the question occurs, is a nice Jewish woman--mother, wife, educator, daughter of Holocaust survivors--writing mystery novels about serial killers, rapists, abusers, psychopaths, racists and the problem of sexual harassment in the Los Angeles Police Department? Rochelle Majer Krich laughs. "Maybe I have to get out my frustrations. No, no, no." She shakes her head as the laugh returns briefly. "I would not connect the Jewish with the mystery, except for two things.
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NEWS
December 16, 1994 | ROBERT EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Why, the question occurs, is a nice Jewish woman--mother, wife, educator, daughter of Holocaust survivors--writing mystery novels about serial killers, rapists, abusers, psychopaths, racists and the problem of sexual harassment in the Los Angeles Police Department? Rochelle Majer Krich laughs. "Maybe I have to get out my frustrations. No, no, no." She shakes her head as the laugh returns briefly. "I would not connect the Jewish with the mystery, except for two things.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First-novelist Jeff Gomez and literary icon T. Coraghessan Boyle will talk about writing, life and the forces influencing their work at separate appearances at the Ventura Bookstore, 522 E. Main St. Gomez, the 25-year-old author of the just-published "Our Noise" (Scribner/Simon & Schuster), writes about the angst-ridden fears, underpaid working days and over-indulging nights of the X generation. Gomez will be at the bookstore at 7:30 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This week's calendar is overflowing with events that should appeal to both professional and novice writers, and literary junkies. Successful authors will be autographing and sharing publishing adventures; or teaching workshops; or showing off their storytelling skills. Comic book swapping and used-book hawking are also on the menu this week. Writers must abandon their pens occasionally to interact with colleagues and chat up possibly helpful contacts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1996 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Achieving success in writing for children and young adults takes a great deal more than just the ability to spin a compelling tale. Successful writers know that they must also understand the needs and interests of today's youngsters. Author Alexis O'Neill will give hints on doing just that when she speaks to the Ventura County Writers Club. O'Neill is the author of "Loud Emily," and regional advisor for the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.
BOOKS
June 12, 1994 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
A few years ago the waters of the Chicago River broke through ancient retaining walls and flooded long-unused tunnels deep beneath the Loop, disrupting utilities, creating chaos and paralyzing mid-town for days. Sara Paretsky has used the event as the center of her latest V. I. Warshawski novel, TUNNEL VISION (Delacorte: $21.95; 432 pp.). In a series of such uniformly high quality it's hard to make comparisons, but I think the new book is one of Paretsky's very best.
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