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Rochelle Newman

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NEWS
February 20, 2003 | Lori Gottlieb, Special to The Times
Clad in head-to-toe black, Rochelle Newman struts onto a darkened stage, sizes up the audience, then announces matter-of-factly: "I was a fat kid." It's hard to imagine Newman, a fit 42-year-old with shoulder-length auburn hair, as a "size 14 at age 14" -- and equally difficult to picture her as the 90-pound anorexic she soon became.
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NEWS
February 20, 2003 | Lori Gottlieb, Special to The Times
Clad in head-to-toe black, Rochelle Newman struts onto a darkened stage, sizes up the audience, then announces matter-of-factly: "I was a fat kid." It's hard to imagine Newman, a fit 42-year-old with shoulder-length auburn hair, as a "size 14 at age 14" -- and equally difficult to picture her as the 90-pound anorexic she soon became.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Dia de los Muertos is anything but dead, and it's increasingly coming to life in Southern California in old and new ways. With Mexico's traditional Day of the Dead approaching, the number and kinds of events are growing in the Southland. Concert promoters, art galleries featuring Mexican folk art and merchants - big and small - are taking advantage of these celebrations and in some cases extending the merchandising of Halloween. Once observed quietly in Latino communities, U.S. festivities are becoming more mainstream and, typically, louder and more visible than in years past.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2007 | Lorenza Munoz and Meg James, Times Staff Writers
Univision Communications Inc. on Wednesday named a new general manager to its flagship television stations in Los Angeles and charged her with boosting revenue and restoring order to KMEX-TV Channel 34, which has been engulfed in management turmoil for nearly six months. Maelia Macin, the former head of the network's stations in Austin, Texas, worked at KMEX in the 1990s as a local sales manager. She replaces Jorge Delgado, who was fired from Univision this year.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Savings of America is using images from the '50s in an attempt to attract as customers the baby boomers who grew up on "I Love Lucy." In a break from its usual humdrum style, the nation's largest savings and loan is airing light-hearted black-and-white commercials that hark back to the days of early TV. In one commercial, ice-skating tellers burst into song, while in another ad, crowns instantly appear atop customers' heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2003 | Philip Brandes;F. Kathleen Foley;David C. Nichols
A merciless punch to the underbelly of hypocrisy, the Blank Theatre Company's "Sanguine" showcases a promising new voice in Andy Hyman's insightful, well-crafted -- though at times overreaching -- portrait of a corporate downsizing victim's psychological disintegration. Jon Shear's staging of Hyman's brisk, one-act monologue (winner of the Blank's 2001 Young Playwrights Festival) stars its original performer, Jeremy Sisto, best known as the psychopathic Billy on HBO's "Six Feet Under."
BUSINESS
June 29, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Univision Communications Inc. has quietly launched its own Spanish-language Internet portal, with online newscasts and shopping, which should significantly advance efforts to bridge the digital divide among immigrant Latinos. Univision's Internet venture also signals an end to the Spanish-language television network's controversial blackout on "dot-com" advertising. The Los Angeles-based network is the fastest-growing broadcaster in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2007 | Duke Helfand, Meg James and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
Mirthala Salinas was a rising star at one of Los Angeles' premier Spanish-language television stations before she came to be known as the other woman in Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's life. A respected and aggressive journalist, she anchored a newscast that won two local Emmy Awards at KVEA-TV Channel 52 during her 10 years at the Telemundo station. She earned a Golden Mike broadcasting award as well.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a simple act that sent Al Anorga's revenue soaring. His company was inching toward success on the strength of its hair-care products when Anorga turned to a market he knew as intimately as the color of his skin. He went straight to the Latino beauty salons and barbershops he grew up around, offering free Spanish-language training on how to best use his color seal products for women and men's pomade, popular with clipper cuts and the trendy Ricky Martin style.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came in caravans from as far away as Fresno, Mexicali and Tucson, all to wonder at No. 34, one of their own. "All of a sudden, everyone was cheering for this guy who was a Mexican," recalled Arturo Vargas, a college kid with big dreams in those heady days, remembering the ubiquitous buzz. "Here we had a Mexican--one of us!--who was a hero for all of L.A., not just for us." It has been 20 years since the craze known as Fernandomania shook Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1985 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Strolling through Puente Hills Mall one afternoon with her son and daughter, Whittier housewife Mercedes Miranda, a first generation Mexican-American, seemed just another consumer on the lookout for a sale. Yet Miranda, who was born in Texas and speaks fluent English, poses a special challenge to advertisers trying to interest her in their products: Which language do they use?
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