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BUSINESS
May 18, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
First U.S. Hookup With Cable, Telephone Company: Rochester Telephone has agreed to connect with a phone system Time Warner Cable is building from its cable TV operation in the city, likely making Rochester, N.Y., the first U.S. city where people will be able to make phone calls over their cable TV systems. The agreement is the first of its kind between a cable operator and a major telephone company in the United States.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
First U.S. Hookup With Cable, Telephone Company: Rochester Telephone has agreed to connect with a phone system Time Warner Cable is building from its cable TV operation in the city, likely making Rochester, N.Y., the first U.S. city where people will be able to make phone calls over their cable TV systems. The agreement is the first of its kind between a cable operator and a major telephone company in the United States.
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BUSINESS
December 20, 2002 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Making good on a pledge to Congress last summer, Global Crossing Ltd. founder Gary Winnick put $25 million into an escrow account Thursday to repay employees for company stock they bought for their pension plan -- shares that became worthless when the fiber-optic network builder filed for bankruptcy protection in January. But his donation didn't sit so well with some, and the payout may not be so simple to accomplish, according to current and former employees.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
Frontier Corp. said Monday that it has agreed to acquire ALC Communications Corp. in a $1.8-billion stock merger that would create the nation's fifth-largest long-distance telephone company. Amid other takeovers and regulatory changes in telecommunications, the companies decided to join forces to better position themselves and compete with the giants--AT&T, MCI, Sprint and LDDS. "Clearly, consolidation of the telecommunications industry has begun and . . .
BUSINESS
March 12, 2002 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet Mahoney has never had to apply for a job since getting out of college 20 years ago. With high-tech positions popping up all over town, companies were wooing her. But as one of the growing number of employees let go by fiber-optic networking company Global Crossing Ltd., which filed for bankruptcy protection in January, the 41-year-old technology executive is finding the job market much different.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | JAY ARNOLD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An "electronic peephole" that displays the telephone number of incoming calls is worrying defenders of privacy rights and stirring concern on Capitol Hill. But others say the new gadget will short-circuit nuisance calls and will be a boon to law enforcement. The new service is known as Automatic Number Identification, or Caller ID, and is being offered for about $6.50 a month plus another $60 to $80 for a small viewing device that flashes an incoming number before the phone is answered.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many foresaw a social revolution two years ago when the sweeping civil rights law called the Americans With Disabilities Act took effect in the nation's larger workplaces. But for people such as Linda Sturgeon, 41, who suffers from disabling muscular dystrophy, freedom from job discrimination remains elusive. Sturgeon says she could not get her old job back last year when--after having worked for her local telephone company in Rochester, N.Y.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Public Utilities Commission late Wednesday proposed throwing open the state's monopolistic local telephone markets to competition within three years as part of a sweeping strategy to thrust the state aggressively into the Information Age. "This report lays out a strategy for taking advantage of new telecommunications technology and bringing that information highway into the classrooms and homes of California," Gov.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an action that critics decried as an abdication of responsibility, the California Public Utilities Commission urged telephone and cable companies Wednesday to sit down and negotiate among themselves how they want to open local phone markets to competition by 1997. Beginning Jan. 1, the PUC said, interested parties will have 90 days to work out a settlement on how to implement a free market for local phone services in California.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the recent failure of federal legislation aimed at spurring competition in the telecommunications industry, local telephone service--the last stronghold of traditional telephone monopolies--is finally being subjected to the rigors of the marketplace. From New York to California, state regulators are taking the lead in eliminating the barriers that have insulated local telephone providers from competition.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1995 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AT&T Corp. sounded its battle horn Thursday, formally announcing plans to enter the local phone business nationwide. And California, along with Connecticut, will be one of the long-distance giant's first targets. If successful, AT&T's foray into the local phone market will help spur competition in a business that remains almost completely controlled by the seven regional Bell telephone companies--the firms that AT&T itself spun off more than a decade ago.
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