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Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

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October 31, 2006 | Randy Lewis
Will the third time be the charm for rap's entrance into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five is once again among the finalists for induction after the pioneering hip-hop group's previous two appearances on that list didn't generate enough sway with the hall's voters to make the final cut, generating considerable criticism within the hip-hop community. Besides Flash, this year's nine contenders are Patti Smith, the Stooges, R.E.M.
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July 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
It's not often a rock star opens up his bedroom closet to the world. Tom Petty did and the results are on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, which is showcasing Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers in an exhibit that opened Friday.
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February 25, 2006 | Geoff Boucher
Just in case you forgot, the Sex Pistols are still anti-establishment -- even if the establishment is the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. "Next to the SEX PISTOLS, rock and roll and that hall of fame is a piss stain ... were [sic] not coming. Were [sic] not your monkey and So what?" That was the tamest portion of a statement posted Friday on the group's official website (www.thefilthandthefury.co.
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December 6, 2005 | Geoff Boucher
The news is still sinking in for Steve Jones: He and the other Sex Pistols are actually headed into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. "It's about as close as you can come to getting knighted in America," says Jones, who these days is a disc jockey on Indie 103.1, the upstart L.A. rock station. "It's amazing. Before when I said I didn't care whether we got in -- well, I was just mad."
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November 29, 2005 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame voters have chosen an eclectic new class broad enough to encompass jazz trumpeter Miles Davis and the punk-pioneering Sex Pistols, but they once again snubbed rap. Other members of the induction class announced Monday were Black Sabbath, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Blondie. For a second consecutive year, hip-hop's prime candidate, Grandmaster Flash, failed to gather the necessary support from the 700 rock historians overseeing nominee selection.
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September 16, 2005 | Richard Cromelin
Was 1980 really that bad for rock music? Artists become eligible for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 25 years after the release of their first record, but the hall's nominating committee couldn't find anyone from the newly eligible class of 1980 to put on the 2005 ballot that was sent to voters this week. That could mean a long-awaited induction for such longtime wallflowers as Black Sabbath (on the ballot for the eighth time), Lynyrd Skynyrd (seventh), the Sex Pistols and Stooges (fifth each).
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March 16, 2005 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
There was a lot of talk at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction dinner here this week about recent anniversaries, from the 50th anniversary of the birth of rock to the 20th anniversary of the induction dinners themselves. But one anniversary was ignored, leaving the Hall of Fame looking shortsighted (at best) and clueless (at worst) in a program that had some otherwise glorious moments, highlighted by Bruce Springsteen's moving induction speech for U2.
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February 25, 2005 | Geoff Boucher
Bruce Springsteen will induct U2 when the Irish band gets ushered into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 14 in New York City. The band's choice furthers the mutual admiration society shared with Springsteen -- the New Jersey rocker tapped U2 frontman Bono to induct him in 1999. B.B. King and Eric Clapton will speak on behalf of Buddy Guy, Neil Young for the Pretenders, Rod Stewart for Percy Sledge and Justin Timberlake for the O'Jays.
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December 14, 2004 | Geoff Boucher
U2, the Irish rock band that for more than two decades has woven commercial success and critical acclaim into a high-minded career, will lead the 2005 class of inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The quartet will be joined by the rock band the Pretenders, Chicago bluesman Buddy Guy, soul singer Percy Sledge and the R&B vocal group the O'Jays.
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October 31, 2004 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
How do you measure greatness in pop music? Rock and Roll Hall of Fame voters have been wrestling with that question for nearly 20 years and they certainly haven't figured it out, or they wouldn't have ended up honoring such marginal figures as Brenda Lee and the Righteous Brothers. It feels a little cruel to mention just those artists when fully two dozen of the more than 125 inductees have questionable credentials.
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