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BUSINESS
September 9, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Z Channel, the eclectic local pay-TV programming service that has waged a money-losing battle with more conventional giants such as HBO and Movie Channel, has been sold for an undisclosed amount to a small Seattle-area cable company that vowed Z's quirky style of programming will continue, company officials said Tuesday.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Z Channel, the eclectic local pay-TV programming service that has waged a money-losing battle with more conventional giants such as HBO and Movie Channel, has been sold for an undisclosed amount to a small Seattle-area cable company that vowed Z's quirky style of programming will continue, company officials said Tuesday.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1989 | Wm. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Z Channel--the quirky and acclaimed Los Angeles-area cable-TV service that for 15 years has specialized in an eclectic mix of old, new and foreign movie fare--is being acquired for an undisclosed sum by a New York-based cable firm whose programming consists largely of news and sports. Rainbow, the programming subsidiary of Cablevision Systems Corp., will take over Z Channel on March 16.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Billionaire Jack Kent Cooke on Friday agreed to sell his Woodland Hills-based cable television system with 675,000 subscribers to a consortium of six companies. A similar deal had fallen apart in March. Cooke, whose businesses include the Daily News in Woodland Hills and the Washington Redskins football team, did not reveal the sales price of Cooke CableVision and sister company 1st CableVision. But cable industry analyst Paul Kagan in Carmel said he had heard estimates of $1.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Owners of Z Channel, a small but popular pay television service in Los Angeles, on Monday filed suit in federal court accusing Time Inc.'s Home Box Office and four major Hollywood studios of unlawful restraint of trade. In its 25-page complaint, Z Channel contended that HBO, the nation's largest pay television company, "has secured or coerced" the cooperation of MGM/UA Telecommunications, Paramount Pictures, 20th Century Fox Film Corp. and Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | PEGGY ZIEGLER, Peggy Ziegler is a free - lance writer and a contributing editor to the trade magazine Cable World. and
When Henry Fonda rides off into the sunset at the end of "My Darlin' Clementine" on Z Channel Thursday night, he'll be taking a piece of Los Angeles TV history with him. The eclectic Z Channel, programmed for film lovers of all stripes, is being shuttered in favor of an all-sports service from the new owners, New York-based Cablevision Systems Corp. and NBC. The John Ford film, Z's last telecast as Z Channel, is a sentimental farewell: The film was a favorite of Jerry Harvey, the passionate but troubled programmer who was the driving force behind Z. The switch to SportsChannel Los Angeles is the final sad passage in what has been a tragic 15 months for Los Angeles' beloved home-grown pay service.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1988 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
In a bid to enlarge its long-stagnant pay-TV subscriber base, Los Angeles' home-grown Z Channel said Tuesday it is merging with two other companies and will abandon its all-movie format to include live sports events, beginning with home baseball games of the Los Angeles Dodgers and the California Angels.
REAL ESTATE
January 8, 1995
Thirteen Southland buildings, including six dramatic homes, have been honored for outstanding architectural design by the Los Angeles chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The 1994 winners were selected from 111 entries submitted by architects in the 2,000-member chapter, said design awards chairman Michael Mann, AIA, of the architectural firm DMJM/Keating. "The jury was looking for sincerity," Mann said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
With a little baseball, basketball, boxing and astrology mixed into its traditional eclectic menu of movies, the Z Channel, one of L.A.'s oldest and smallest cable services, is finally making it in the big leagues. Since it added Dodgers and Angels home baseball games to its 24-hour-a-day lineup of movies last April, subscriptions to the long-floundering pay-TV channel have increased nearly 40%. Approximately 110,000 Southern California households subscribe to Z.
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