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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Mexicans and Mexican Americans have been weighing in about the performance of Mexican superstar rock band Maná at an inaugural ball for President Obama. The consensus so far? It was a good night for rock en español -- and a smart political move as well. In numerous tweets, Mexican Americans and other Latinos expressed their feelings of pride in witnessing the band playing for the Oval Office occupant. "Makes you proud to be hispanic!" wrote a young woman with the Twitter name "anais.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Michael Nesmith's name is far more often associated with the Monkees than the birth of Southern California country rock. Yet the former rock sitcom star played a key part in a 1960s scene when long hair and cowboy boots all a sudden made sense together. Nesmith blended rock and country music alongside artists such as Linda Ronstadt and Gram Parsons. Much of it happened at the Troubadour, where the hybrid sound was taking shape. "Linda would come play, the Dillards, [Roger] McGuinn would come play, [David]
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Latino voters supported President Obama by more than 2 to 1 in his second run for the White House, and now Obama is pledging to make comprehensive immigration reform a cornerstone of his second term. In that context, it's not surprising that Obama's party planners have invited the Mexican pop-rock band Maná to perform at the president's inaugural ball. They'll join a lineup that includes Alicia Keys, Stevie Wonder and Katy Perry. The hit-making Guadalajara quartet, which has won multiple Grammy and Latin Grammy awards and is known for graceful rock anthems like "Mariposa Traicionera," supported Obama's re-election bid last fall.
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By James Barragan
By the time two of the L.A. KISS' star players were lowered from the Honda Center ceiling during introductions for the team's home opener, the team's fans were ready to rock and roll all night and party every down. Behind four touchdowns from wide receiver Donovan Morgan and a league-record six sacks in one game for Beau Bell, the KISS won its first game at its home venue in Anaheim, 44-34, in front of 12,045 fans. The victory improved the KISS' record to 2-1 while setting a league record of 11 team sacks in one game.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By August Brown
This post has been updated, see below for details. Three men, including two members of a Brooklyn rock band, are dead after a fellow musician shot them to death in their East Williamsburg apartments before turning the gun on himself, according to various news reports in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Quoting a law enforcement official, the Wall Street Journal  said that the musician, a onetime affiliate of the band, used a .308-caliber rifle as he moved from floor to floor of the apartment building to find and shoot members of the Yellow Dogs.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2011 | Ben Fritz
Viacom Inc. has been ordered to pay an additional $383 million to the makers of Rock Band, the latest development in a long and costly saga surrounding the media giant's failed attempt to enter the video game business. In a regulatory filing, Viacom, the owner of MTV Networks and Paramount Pictures, said accountants in a private arbitration process determined that it owes the money to former shareholders of Harmonix Music Systems Inc. on top of a $150-million bonus payment that it previously made.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Wade Michael Page, the man accused of killing six people at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, was a member of a white supremacist band called End Apathy, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, and in a 2010 interview about the band had expressed disappointment with a “sick society.” Page, a U.S. Army veteran who was administratively discharged in 1998 after being demoted in rank, was shot and killed Sunday after ambushing two police officers who...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The cries of progressive rock fans the world over have been heard: Rush has been nominated to join the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Thirteen years after the Canadian power trio became eligible and 44 years after it formed, the band responsible for songs such as “Tom Sawyer,” “Spirit of the Radio,” the epic concept album "2112," and dozens of gold records has made the first cut on its way to the theoretically hallowed walls of...
NATIONAL
November 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Tina Susman
NEW YORK - They said they sang in English instead of Farsi because they wanted their music to be heard by the world, but their secret performance space in Tehran was padded with Styrofoam so they wouldn't be arrested for playing forbidden music. Their shows in Iran sometimes had lookouts, and the rockers had to ask fans to come but not to bring their friends, lest they attract too much attention. In other words, they were as punk rock as punk rock gets. But when the band known as the Yellow Dogs eventually fled Tehran to escape repression and claim their slice of indie glory in Brooklyn, tragedy followed.
WORLD
February 21, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
TEL AVIV - Before the Israeli rock band 9 Lives takes the stage, its members gather for a rowdy group hug. They slap one another on the back, jump a few times in unison and gulp shots of arak, a popular anise-infused spirit. The nine musicians have overcome crippling injuries and post-traumatic stress to arrive together at a popular Tel Aviv nightclub, where on this night they share billing with Israeli rock legend Ehud Banai. "This band keeps me alive," said 9 Lives vocalist Dekel Darchani, 37, who wears his black hair in a rockabilly pompadour.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Sarah Palin's upcoming cable series about the great outdoors officially has a theme song.  Sportsman Channel, which debuts "Amazing America with Sarah Palin" next week, enlisted the rock outfit Madison Rising for the tune. The group, self-described as "America's Most Patriotic Band," is probably best known for its unconventional rendering of "The Star Spangled Banner. " In keeping with the show's subject matter, the theme song's lyrics contain references to nature, flags, glory, dogs, horses, trucks and guns.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By August Brown
Bradley Hanan Carter feared the worst about his future. The New Zealander singer-songwriter had spent much of the 2000s with his rock band, Steriogram, that was on a major label and had a track in an Apple commercial. Since landing in L.A. though, his music career had fallen off. He wondered if he'd have to pack it all in soon. FOR THE RECORD: Echo Park's NO: In the March 8 Calendar section, a profile of the Echo Park band NO said that its record label, Arts & Crafts Records, is based in Montreal.
WORLD
February 21, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
TEL AVIV - Before the Israeli rock band 9 Lives takes the stage, its members gather for a rowdy group hug. They slap one another on the back, jump a few times in unison and gulp shots of arak, a popular anise-infused spirit. The nine musicians have overcome crippling injuries and post-traumatic stress to arrive together at a popular Tel Aviv nightclub, where on this night they share billing with Israeli rock legend Ehud Banai. "This band keeps me alive," said 9 Lives vocalist Dekel Darchani, 37, who wears his black hair in a rockabilly pompadour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
With a strong push from MTV, spoken-word poetry went mainstream in the mid-1990s, and Maggie Estep was its leading lady. Dressed in black, often backed by a rock band, Estep was a sassy, slightly twisted New Yorker who wrote and performed humorous, biting pieces that merged poetry with stand-up comedy. A regular at Manhattan's Nuyorican Poets Café, the center of the poetry slam movement, she was a crowd favorite for pieces with titles like "Hey Baby" and "The Stupid Jerk I'm Obsessed With.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
If anyone has a great excuse for taking so long to put out a solo album, it's Benmont Tench, longtime keyboardist and occasional songwriter with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. Close to 40 years ago he came to Southern California with other members of the aspiring Florida rock band Mudcrutch, which failed to gain any traction and shortly disbanded. Tench and bandmate Stan Lynch subsequently went into a West Los Angeles recording studio with the intention of starting a new band. “We were going to call it the Drunks,” Tench said by phone from New York earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The new single from U2 is called "Invisible," and it was released for free on iTunes on Super Bowl Sunday. Produced by Danger Mouse and taken from the band's forthcoming album, it's both a pleasant surprise and a fairly typical track by the world's biggest rock band. Relying on the Teutonic "motorik" beat as the propellant, it features the kind of grand, aspirational chorus that Bono and buds were born to birth and flies on the wings of a typically sticky guitar melody courtesy of the Edge.  Which is another way of saying, if you're not down with U2's vibe, don't consider "Beautiful Day" to be among the band's best, have made your mind up about Bono or consider them incapable of cruising down roads no other major rock band dare travel, get off the bus at the next stop.  Me, I think it's a prime U2 jam, a snagged-from-the-ether track so logical as to feel somehow fated to exist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2010 | Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Michael Been, a singer, songwriter, guitarist and founding member of the Northern California modern rock band the Call, which broke out with the 1983 MTV hit "The Walls Came Down," has died. He was 60. Been (pronounced Bean) died Thursday after suffering a heart attack at the Pukkelpop festival in Hasselt, Belgium, where he had been serving as a sound engineer for his son Robert's band Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. His death was announced in a statement from Black Rebel Motorcycle Club's publicist, Juliana Plotkin.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2010 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Viacom Inc. has found an unlikely buyer for Harmonix Music Systems, the creator of its Rock Band video games. The media giant announced Thursday that it had sold the Cambridge, Mass.-based Harmonix to Columbus Nova, a private investment firm in New York. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but several analysts said the price was probably less than $100 million, significantly less than Viacom paid to acquire the development studio in 2006. One person familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak about it for attribution said Viacom wanted to sell Harmonix by Dec. 31 to improve its tax position in the current year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2014 | Steven Zeitchik
PARK CITY, Utah -- Seven years ago at Sundance, a member of a soulful rock band from across the pond made his directorial debut with a music-themed movie populated with haunting melodies and a delicate relationship between a male and female musician. That film was John Carney's "Once," and it became such a success story that in the promo short that runs before each screening this year touting great discoveries over Sundance's 30 years, the film makes an appearance, right alongside “Reservoir Dogs” and “Hoop Dreams.” On Saturday night at Sundance, another music-themed narrative film, Stuart Murdoch's "God Help the Girl," made its premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Todd Martens
In 2013, films such as "The Wolf of Wall Street," "Spring Breakers" and "Pain & Gain" showed us the corrupting power of cash. The just-scraping-by stress articulated by New York rock band the Parquet Courts, on the other hand, captures the souls who just can't get a break - a soundtrack for twenty- and thirtysomethings who graduated college and have found dead-end jobs rather than a career. There's humor, but it isn't always pretty. Stoned, starving and facing a meal that's little more than a bag of Swedish Fish, the souls that populate the Parquet Courts' most recent full-length, "Light Up Gold," are all on a mission of sorts, but what they're searching for often isn't clear.
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