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SPORTS
December 17, 2012 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers got a relatively easy win against the Philadelphia 76ers on Sunday, improving to 11-14 with two straight road victories. The Sixers have done well this year considering Andrew Bynum, dealing with knee problems, has yet to suit up. Philadelphia has also gotten a taste of the Lakers' troubles by losing Jrue Holiday to a foot injury. Holiday isn't expected to be out long, but the Sixers' three-game losing streak shows it's not exactly a simple thing to play in the NBA without a starting point guard and big man. The Lakers have been forced to play through injuries to Steve Nash (leg)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By August Brown
Onstage, 19-year-old Archy Marshall looked like a surly high-schooler on class portrait day: a too-big brown sport coat, a thrift-shop tie and a perpetual discontented sneer.  But whenever he opened his mouth at his headlining show Wednesday night, the wounded growl that came out had a rough wisdom all its own. Marshall's project, King Krule, doesn't have many peers in contemporary music. His gravelly slur gets him deserved Tom Waits allusions; his torrent of bummed-out, street-level lyricism puts him in the line of English greats like the Fall and the Jam. The music on his debut, "6 Feet Beneath the Moon," almost sounds like angry smooth jazz -- moody diminished and augmented guitar chords, played without distortion but with a post-punky panic.  He's got fans in Beyoncé and Frank Ocean, and Wednesday's set proved why many more are likely to follow them.
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SPORTS
February 17, 1985 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Things keep getting worse before they get better for Chapman College's basketball team and Saturday night, the Panthers had a close and personal encounter with the very rock bottom. Twenty-four hours after forgetting the rudiments of elementary jump-shooting in Riverside, Chapman accomplished something without precedent in 1985--lose a conference game to Cal Poly Pomona. That's Cal Poly Pomona as in rebuilding, struggling, undermanned, 0-10 Cal Poly Pomona.
WORLD
June 26, 2013 | By Henry Chu
PARIS - Satirists and critics call him "Flanby," after an oft-derided French custard treat that's wobbly, soft and faintly ridiculous. But the real problem for President Francois Hollande is this: Even flanby (the dessert) is probably more popular than he is. After winning election in May 2012 promising to be a new kind of leader, the mild-mannered Hollande now finds himself saddled with the lowest approval ratings of any French president since the establishment of the Fifth Republic 55 years ago. Weighed down by a feeble economy, record unemployment, damaging scandals, a divisive battle over same-sex marriage and an inconsistent political message, Hollande has alienated even many of his natural supporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1990 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
The Grammy Awards nominations are the talk of the town this week. But the real hot topic at industry cocktail parties isn't always the year's most acclaimed albums. Sometimes, the hubbub is over the least acclaimed records. In fact, many execs have been ribbing each other in recent days about the albums that--artistically at least--everyone would like to forget. That means it's time for Pop Eye's 10th annual Bottom 10 Poll, a collection of 1989's biggest critical flops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2011 | Sandy Banks
She told me not to straighten up. She needed to see my home office "to see how your mind thinks," she said. But as I sat at my computer, waiting for hired organizer Suzanne O'Donnell, the thinking process reflected in my messy desk suddenly struck me as horrifying. It wouldn't hurt, I told myself, to haul these batches of newspapers to the recycling bin. And it's not really straightening up if I just shift things around a bit to make a place for the calendar I discovered hidden under those newspaper piles.
NEWS
March 17, 1985 | VICTORIA GRAHAM, Associated Press
A hundred years ago, Rudyard Kipling called it the "City of Dreadful Night," and it is still the urban nightmare, the Black Hole of the 20th Century. Its name has become a synonym for urban apocalypse, a city in its death throes: Calcutta. Home to 10 million people and India's largest city, Calcutta is the compendium of the ills of the world's cities. Once known as the city of palaces, it has become the city of problems, the textbook case of metropolitan gangrene that has defied cure.
SPORTS
October 14, 1988 | RICHARD JUSTICE, Washington Post
It was one line of tiny type in the spring of 1986, and it hardly raised an eyebrow. The Oakland Athletics had offered a minor league contract to pitcher Dave Stewart. Who cared? The hapless A's were on their way to an 86-loss season, and Stewart appeared to be playing himself out of the game. In the previous 12 months, he had been traded from the Texas Rangers to the Philadelphia Phillies for a pitcher named Rich Surhoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | DAVID LANSING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I don't know why they even invited me to join them, these two women. I am superfluous. I am the parsley on their plates, the unopened catsup bottle on the table. They drink their Australian chardonnay, though we are at a brew pub in the Irvine Spectrum, and eat their froufrou food--lettuce with raw ahi, lettuce with smoked salmon--and totally ignore me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1990 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every year for the past decade, Rep. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Los Angeles) has sent questionnaires to each household in his West San Fernando Valley and Westside Los Angeles district, soliciting constituent views on national defense, the deficit and social issues. "It gives me a feel for how people out there feel," Beilenson said, citing the thousands of responses his office receives. "It does give people an opportunity to tell their representative how they feel.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2013 | By Don Lee, Andrew Tangel and E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
For all the mixed messages from the Fed and the uncertainty that has roiled financial markets recently, one thing looks very clear: The era of declining interest rates is over. After three decades in which borrowing costs for Americans have pretty much declined steadily to rock-bottom levels - easing consumer debt burdens for cars, homes and college education - the long-term path of interest rates is now at a turning point, according to many economists and investors. Regardless of the Federal Reserve's statement and its economic outlook to be issued Wednesday and the market's reaction to Chairman Ben S. Bernanke's comments at his quarterly news conference, the reality is that the flood of easy money is ebbing and the economy is shifting to a new period of rising rates.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
After a 911 call, a disastrous haircut, an alcoholic relapse, two Q-Tip-related emergencies and countless stalker-y emails and text messages, Adam and Hannah, the oddball couple at the center of “Girls,” are finally back together.   Yay, I guess? On Sunday night a season of “Girls” that had increasingly begun to feel like a premium-cable version of   “My Strange Addiction” suddenly -- and not altogether convincingly -- morphed into a romantic comedy, complete with a sentimental and semi-absurd reunion that found Adam, bare-chested as usual, racing down the street to rescue his house-bound and unhinged ex. (In a sure sign of their compatability, Hannah eschews pants nearly as emphatically as Adam rejects shirts; together they make a whole outfit.)
SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | By Eric Pincus
Mike D'Antoni said Tuesday that Steve Nash is nearing a return to the court, although the Lakers coach wasn't willing to lock down a specific date. "It's close," D'Antoni said. "A lot of it will be determined Thursday and Friday when he actually goes five-on-five and plays two hard practices and [team officials] see how he is. From there, he'll determine when he needs to go. " Nash suffered a non-displaced leg fracture in the second game of the season, a visit to the Portland Trail Blazers.
SPORTS
December 17, 2012 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers got a relatively easy win against the Philadelphia 76ers on Sunday, improving to 11-14 with two straight road victories. The Sixers have done well this year considering Andrew Bynum, dealing with knee problems, has yet to suit up. Philadelphia has also gotten a taste of the Lakers' troubles by losing Jrue Holiday to a foot injury. Holiday isn't expected to be out long, but the Sixers' three-game losing streak shows it's not exactly a simple thing to play in the NBA without a starting point guard and big man. The Lakers have been forced to play through injuries to Steve Nash (leg)
OPINION
December 16, 2012
Re "Fed to tie interest rate to job gains," Dec. 13 It's disappointing that no mention is made of the effect of the Federal Reserve's decision to keep interest rates at rock bottom on those who have set aside a good portion of their incomes as savings over the years. People who have been fiscally prudent all their lives to build savings for their later years now see the income they had counted on from those savings diminished by these low rates. Although the Fed's actions may help encourage the investment needed for the job growth we so badly require, it would be nice to see the downside for a large segment of the population at least acknowledged.
SPORTS
August 19, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
The Angels continued to redefine rock bottom in a season filled with new lows, their 8-3 loss to Tampa Bay on Sunday completing the Rays' four-game sweep in Angel Stadium and dropping the Angels a season-high nine games behind the Texas Rangers in the American League West. Zack Greinke, thought to be the crucial piece  to push the Angels into World Series contention when he was acquired from Milwaukee for three double-A prospects on July 27, was roughed up for six runs and seven hits in six innings, as the Angels lost for the 13th time in 18 games.
NEWS
December 21, 1995 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Dennis Flowers was here, he was a child. And now at age 31 he has returned to the bustling Christmas tree lot in the warehouse district near downtown with his wife, Berta, and 2-year-old stepson, Marvin. It has been 15 years, maybe more, since he last had a tree, long before he went to prison. It has been even longer for Berta, 30, who guesses she was 12 the last time she gazed at the twinkling lights of a family tree.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012
MUSIC The Rock Bottom Remainders are living proof that all writers are really just failed rock stars. Stephen King, Dave Barry, Mitch Albom, Scott Turow, Amy Tan, Matt Groening and a whole slate of other on-the-page favorites have soldiered on for two decades in this cheeky rock outfit, which draws its run to a close at this final public show, with proceeds benefiting L.A.'s Midnight Mission and the Downtown Women's Center, plus the launch of...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012 | By Steve Hochman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pick a fight with Stephen King? Roger McGuinn has no fear. Asked if he's a better writer than King is a musician, McGuinn - a Rock and Roll Hall of Famer with '60s Los Angeles band the Byrds - laughed, but didn't hesitate. "I think so," he says, speaking from a solo tour stop in Nashville. "That's not saying a whole lot, though. Stephen still needs to work on his F chord. " McGuinn and King, an amateur guitarist and singer, are sometimes-members of the Rock Bottom Remainders, a pickup band of mostly authors which for the last 20 years has played charity concerts of rock classics and a few originals.
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