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January 21, 1987 | RICHARD CROMELIN
In a reversal of the usual process, a rock group and its record company are requesting radio stations not to play one of its songs. That's one element of an agreement reached Tuesday between the British band the Cure and the Washington-based American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee over the group's song "Killing an Arab."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
On the Radar Brothers' eighth album the long-running Los Angeles guitar rock group founded by Jim Putnam continues its gradual, if at times glacially-paced, expansion. Twenty years after its formation, the band has thickened its sound with more dynamic layers and arrangements, even as the voice at the center remains stubbornly consistent. Since their inception, the Radar Brothers have continually worked on creating the perfect languid guitar rock song, as if orbiting an ideal that they never quite seem to touch.
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BUSINESS
March 14, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Crosby, Stills and Nash, the folk and rock group that had a string of hits in the late 1960s and '70s, is considering selling a bond backed by future royalty payments, according to people familiar with the situation. The group and its managers want to duplicate the kind of bonds British rocker David Bowie sold in February.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Meredith Blake, Los Angeles Times
David Letterman lost out on "The Tonight Show" to Jay Leno 20 years ago, but as of Wednesday he can boast of at least one accomplishment his rival doesn't have: He has been named a Kennedy Center honoree. The "Late Show" host, who recently celebrated his 30th year in late-night television, will receive the award, which recognizes lifetime achievement in the performing arts and culture, during a gala in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 2. This year's list of recipients draws from popular and high culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001
Marcelo Fromer, 39, the lead guitarist for the pioneering Brazilian rock group Titas, died Wednesday from injuries he suffered in a hit-and-run accident. Fromer was hit by a motorcycle Monday night while he was jogging in the upscale Jardims neighborhood of Sao Paolo. Doctors at Sao Paolo's Hospital das Clinicas said he had massive head injuries. Fromer was a founding member of Titas, which was hugely popular in the 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
It's out of the recording studios and into the docket for the rock group Boston, whose leader is the defendant in a $20-million breach-of-contract lawsuit by CBS records. In opening arguments Tuesday, Don Engel, an attorney for band leader Tom Scholz, said the company bullied his client, illegally suspended his royalties and could not, or would not, understand Scholz's artistic difficulties.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2004 | Randy Lewis
It's official: Creed is no more. Reports of the rock group's breakup have been circulating for months, and Friday the band members confirmed that the act, whose three albums have sold nearly 24 million copies in the U.S., has called it quits. "Creed was one of the most amazing journeys through music and friendship I am blessed to say I was part of," singer Scott Stapp said in a statement released by the group's label, Wind-Up Records. Stapp's first post-Creed recording is due for release Aug.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2000 | From Reuters
Hard rock band Limp Bizkit has teamed up with controversial Internet company Napster Inc. to launch a free U.S. concert tour, and the group's singer on Monday criticized fellow artists who have accused Napster of promoting music piracy. Napster software allows users to trade and search for MP3s, free downloadable files of musical performances. A fan can type in the name of the desired song, click on the desired version and instantly download it--all for free.
NEWS
July 18, 1996
John Panozzo, 47, co-founder and drummer of the rock group Styx. Panozzo, his twin brother, Chuck, and vocalist-keyboardist Dennis DeYoung formed Styx in the late 1960s and rode a wave of success that included four consecutive triple-platinum albums from 1977 to 1980. The first, "The Grand Illusion," is now considered one of the seminal art-rock albums of the 1970s. The band's biggest successes came with such songs as "Babe," "Come Sail Away," "Renegade" and "Too Much Time on My Hands."
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | Associated Press
Drummer Eric Carr of the rock group Kiss has died from complications of cancer, his publicist said Monday. Carr, 41, who died Sunday at Bellevue Hospital, had a malignant tumor removed from his heart earlier this year and underwent chemotherapy for cancer in his lungs, said his spokeswoman, Carol Kaye of Kayos Productions in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
David Longstreth is pretty sure he knows why people have been surprised by the infectious, often beautiful new record from his experimental rock outfit, Dirty Projectors. "Maybe it's because I once made a concept album about Don Henley," he says, referring to 2005's "The Getty Address. " "Or because I made one where I reimagined a Black Flag album from memory. " That would be 2007's "Rise Above," which features the singer-guitarist's very loose interpretation of "Damaged" by the Hermosa Beach hard-core band.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012 | By Steve Hochman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pick a fight with Stephen King? Roger McGuinn has no fear. Asked if he's a better writer than King is a musician, McGuinn - a Rock and Roll Hall of Famer with '60s Los Angeles band the Byrds - laughed, but didn't hesitate. "I think so," he says, speaking from a solo tour stop in Nashville. "That's not saying a whole lot, though. Stephen still needs to work on his F chord. " McGuinn and King, an amateur guitarist and singer, are sometimes-members of the Rock Bottom Remainders, a pickup band of mostly authors which for the last 20 years has played charity concerts of rock classics and a few originals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2009
Steve Williams Pro wrestler was called 'Dr. Death' Steve "Dr. Death" Williams, 49, a former offensive lineman and All-American wrestler at the University of Oklahoma who was best known for his work in professional wrestling, died Tuesday night in Lakewood, Colo., after a long battle with throat cancer, said former Oklahoma wrestling coach Stan Abel. Williams was a big star in Japan in the 1980s and '90s, forming a tag team with the late Terry Gordy and holding numerous pro wrestling titles there.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2009 | By Randy Lewis
In response to rock band No Doubt's lawsuit against Activision over use of the band members' likenesses in the Band Hero video game, the game developer has filed a response saying it has done no wrong and faults No Doubt for failing to request a restriction on the game function that lets users unlock computerized characters to perform any of the 60-plus songs in the game. Activision also filed a counterclaim accusing the quartet of reneging on its promise to help market and publicize the game, which was released in November, and alleged that No Doubt has been "unjustly enriched by its wrongful conduct against Activision."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2009 | ANN POWERS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
This week, the entertainment world is flush with excitement about a band that broke up nearly 40 years ago, whose songs are so familiar that many children first hear them as lullabies and whose influence is so pervasive that a basic pop music modifier has its name as a root: Beatlesque. Just-minted sounds abound in the marketplace, including breakthroughs from young stars like Colbie Caillat and long-awaited returns by the likes of Phish and Jay-Z. Top 40 radio still belongs to Taylor Swift and the Black Eyed Peas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2009 | Keith Thursby
Larry Knechtel, a member of the 1970s soft-rock group Bread, who had a wide-ranging career as a studio musician, has died. Knechtel died Thursday at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital in Yakima, Wash. He was 69. A hospital official would not release a cause of death, but a report in the Yakima Herald-Republic said he apparently suffered a heart attack. Knechtel played keyboards, bass guitar and harmonica as a member of the Wrecking Crew, a group of Los Angeles studio musicians that included future headliners Glen Campbell and Leon Russell and session drummer Hal Blaine.
NEWS
September 22, 1991
Rob Tyner, 46, lead vocalist for the seminal rock group MC5. Tyner, whose legal name was Robert Derminer, was the lead singer of the group that critics called a precursor of punk and heavy metal. The Detroit-based band--originally called the Motor City Five--played during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago to raise money for the revolutionary White Panther Party. MC5's biggest hit was "Kick Out the Jams," from their first album in 1969.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County judge has ordered the alternative rock group the Cure to pay $75,000 to a 25-year-old man who claimed he was roughed up by the band's bodyguard after a concert at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheater in 1996. Superior Court Judge Francisco F. Firmat issued the default judgment on Wednesday after the band failed to respond to the lawsuit filed in 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2008 | Corina Knoll, Knoll is a Times staff writer.
The faces onstage were unfamiliar and so was the language, but students at Franklin High School in Highland Park didn't appear to mind as they gathered in the courtyard Tuesday to watch Hadag Nahash, an Israeli hip-hop-rock-funk group, perform songs entirely in Hebrew.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
The Grateful Dead, the Doors, Led Zeppelin and Carlos Santana asked a judge to force a music archive to turn over thousands of documents and recordings they say are key to their fight over memorabilia and music rights. The archive, sued by the musicians last year for alleged copyright and trademark infringement, failed to turn over about half of the documents it was ordered to produce, according to papers filed Tuesday in federal court in San Jose.
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