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April 13, 1989 | ROGER CATLIN, The Hartford Courant
Look, I don't like it any more than you do. But it's time to face the music. Or at least its decline. If rock 'n' roll is not dead, its demise is rapidly being hastened by these 10 factors: 1. Rock 'n' roll halls of fame, museums and exhibits have turned a vital youth movement into an aged, tiring museum piece. 2. With both AM and FM rock stations dominated by oldies as a way to chase an aging population demographic, rock radio is going the way of big band music and "Music of Your Life."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
This post has been corrected. See item below. On a Tuesday night in October 1978, a struggling restaurant in Chinatown decided to try some new music. Madame Wong's was having trouble finding customers with a regular Polynesian dance floor show. So proprietor Esther Wong, with some convincing, gave the stage to two punk rock bands. Guitars wailed. Drums crashed. Eggrolls were served. A new venue for Los Angeles punk rock was born. The late 1970s were a golden time for punk rock in Southern California, but traditional music venues looked down on the budding genre.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1990
Now it's rock music as a weapon against Washington state sea lions (Part A, Jan. 29)! Where's the SPCA? AL HIX Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
With the boulder bearing the image of an eagle in flight lording over it, the annual Eagle Rock Music Festival celebrates 15 years on Saturday by taking over the neighborhood's business district. Featuring multiple stages, the day-long party will echo through the hills of Northeast Los Angeles with experimental electronic and ambient music, Americana, rock, global bass, jazz, blues and punk, as well as food and family-centered action. It's an impressive and adventurous roster, featuring artists Bosnian Rainbows, Poolside, Boardwalk, Nguzunguzu, Dub Club and a few dozen others, and presents evidence of the vibrant music community that has blossomed in the area.  Over the span of the festival's life, Eagle Rock and its sister neighborhoods Highland Park and Atwater Village have become independent music havens, home to labels including Friends of Friends, Innovative Leisure, Stones Throw, Now-Again, Alpha Pup, Brainfeeder and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Hopes that the three surviving Beatles would stage a mini-reunion at Wednesday night's third annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction dinner were dashed by Paul McCartney. And that led to some bad vibrations from the Beach Boys' Mike Love.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I've long considered Ellen Willis something of a hero. I hope I live longer than she did (Willis died in 2006, at 64), but otherwise, it's an exemplary life. She was the first pop music critic of the New Yorker, writing 56 pieces for the magazine from 1968 to 1975 that trace her relationship with "music that boldly and aggressively laid out what the singer wanted, loved, hated ... [and] challenged me to do the same. " In the mid-1970s, she began to focus less on music and more on feminism and her own stunning brand of liberation politics, becoming an editor and writer at the Village Voice and later founding the Cultural Reporting and Criticism program at NYU. Her writing is rigorous, unrelenting, in your face: not in the sense of mindless provocation but because she was so smart.
NEWS
May 7, 1985 | Associated Press
A four-alarm fire roared through a building owned by rock music impresario Bill Graham today, destroying music memorabilia and causing $1 million in damage, authorities said. There were no injuries. Capt. Richard Crispen of the arson investigation team called the pre-dawn blaze "suspicious." Housed inside the building were gold records and psychedelic posters from concerts Graham promoted at the Fillmore auditorium in the 1960s, according to KCBS radio.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | From United Press International
The first record album about the intifada , the Palestinian uprising in the Israeli-occupied territories, goes on sale this month in Paris, record store operators said Wednesday. "Music of Intifada" is a collection of 14 songs sung by Palestinians who have taken part in the nearly 14-month-old uprising in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, its producers said.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Paul Butterfield, a harmonica player who played a leading role in popularizing the blues with rock audiences in the 1960s, was found dead early Monday in his North Hollywood apartment, the Los Angeles County coroner's office said. He was 44. Coroner's spokesman Bill Gold said there "was no apparent cause of death" and that an autopsy would be performed. The body, clad in street clothes, was found in the kitchen of the apartment by Butterfield's manager, Jesse Turajskt, Gold said.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | ROBERT CHOW, Times Staff Writer
A Napa County Superior Court judge Friday blocked white supremacist groups from holding a planned "Aryan Woodstock" rock concert this weekend, but refused a request from local officials to ban the event altogether. Organizers immediately announced that they will hold a political rally at the site, 70 acres of rolling farmland between Napa and Vallejo leased for the occasion by former Ku Klux Klan leader Tom Metzger.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By August Brown
What does it mean to insult an all-female rock band as “too serious?” That's one undercurrent that bothered me at Savages' incendiary set at the El Rey Theatre on Thursday night. The public face of the London quartet is this: four young women who play a live-wire kind of experimental punk. They wear a lot of black and have stares that could re-freeze a melting Arctic; the music plumbs new depths of minor keys, and they prefer guitar playing that sounds more like sticking a guitar cable in an electrical socket.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013
Alabama Shakes' first album, "Boys & Girls," is an electric jolt that anyone who loves blues-based rock music should track down immediately. Consisting of three men and one young explosion named Brittany Howard on vocals and guitar, the group, which formed in northern Alabama in 2009, offers stripped-down truth, minus any affectation, histrionics or irony. Rather, the Shakes make rock 'n' soul music as if the last 40 years of popular sounds had never happened. Songs, instead, suggest that sweet period from 1966 to 1974, when electric blues and rock music were intermingling.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
The heart of rock 'n' roll may be in Cleveland, but Miami, Fla., residents have purchased more music per capita from Amazon.com Inc. than any other major U.S. city in the last year, the online retail giant said Tuesday. Pulling together sales of MP3s, CDs and vinyl records, the Seattle company said Miami also has remarkably diverse music tastes. Miami customers bought more Latin, dance and heavy metal music than any other city. It also topped sales rankings for children's music.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
Rock 'n' roll fans should have a blockbuster summer at the Arizona Biltmore , where room rates start at $109. Elton John , Eric Clapton and Bruce Springsteen , to name a few, have all vacationed at the Phoenix resort, which is capitalizing on its music connections with its "Rockin' Summer" events. Headlining the program is "Rock On! The Exhibit," a showcase of more than 30 images by photographer John Robert Rowlands that traces the history of rock music (through Sept.16)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
This post has been corrected, please see below for details. In March, the Sunset Strip music venue the Key Club announced that it was closing for good. Few local music fans were especially surprised. The venue had operated in various guises since the '60s - first as Gazzarri's, where it hosted such rock 'n' roll royalty as the Doors, Guns N' Roses and Van Halen - and as the Key Club since 1998. It closed briefly in 2009, but 2013 was to be the final curtain for the club's monthly slate of heavy metal, hip-hop and stuffed local bills where bands sometimes had to prepay for blocks of tickets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By August Brown
Nineteen years ago Friday, the singer for the most important American rock band of the '90s died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in his Seattle home. Kurt Cobain was only 27, leaving behind his wife Courtney Love and daughter Frances Bean Cobain.  His legacy includes recording one of the most influential catalogs in rock music, upending the music business by proving an indie-inspired act could become a blockbuster, defining a generation's style and proving that the loudest, heaviest band in rock could also be one of its most feminist and introspective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1985 | KENNETH F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
The senator's intent, quite simply, is to turn down the volume on loud rock music acts that have been a persistent irritant to residents near the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa. But when state Sen. John Seymour (R-Anaheim) presented his bill Tuesday before the Senate Agriculture and Water Resources Committee, the loudest protests were from operators of rural county fairs, not fans of Jefferson Starship, Black Uhuru or Sheena Easton.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | Scott Timberg
Despite its long-held reputation as the most aesthetically minded nation in the civilized West, Italy has never been able to produce a decent, well-known rock band. With (H)itweek L.A., Rome-based music promoter Francesco Del Maro is hoping to change that. "My main goal is to show the world we're not just about the mandolino," said Del Maro, 37, who is behind the Italian music and culture festival that comes to town this week and concludes Sunday. "We have very successful artists, from rock to heavy metal to reggae to world music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Paul Williams was returning to his dorm room when a fellow student relayed a message that was radical even for the 1960s: "Hey, Williams! You got a phone call from Bob Dylan. " Not long before, it was Paul Simon who had rung Williams up on the hallway pay phone. He too wanted to let the Swarthmore College freshman know how much he enjoyed his writing. At 17, Williams was the founder and editor of Crawdaddy, a tiny journal of rock criticism whose first edition he mimeographed in a friend's Brooklyn basement and distributed to record stores, clubs and concert halls.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Want to learn something new about music mogul Clive Davis ? Well, as of Feb. 19, there's Davis' new book written with veteran Rolling Stone writer Anthony deCurtis, “The Soundtrack of My Life,” which offers 608 pages of reflections by the former head of Columbia, Arista and J Records, and now chief creative officer for Sony Music. That volume is already generating plenty of media interest, in no small part to Davis' revelation that he is bisexual -- a topic that doesn't crop up in another new tome released last month, “Clive: Working for the Man in the Age of Vinyl.” It's labeled “a memoir,” and rightfully so, because despite the placement of Davis' name so prominently in the title, it's really less any sort of analysis or expose about the record industry titan than a soul-searching reflection by author Don Silver, who spent two years in the late '70s and early  '80s working for Davis as he was building Arista into a pop and R&B powerhouse after being fired from Columbia.
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