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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Kim Fowley came out of a Hollywood that doesn't exist anymore, the Hollywood of Kenneth Anger and Ed Wood. Best known for cooking up the Runaways, he began to work in the music business in the late 1950s and since then has turned up in more places than Woody Allen's Zelig, producing for Gene Vincent, writing with Warren Zevon and introducing John Lennon and the Plastic Ono Band when they performed in Toronto in 1969. Fowley turned 73 in 2012, and by his own admission has been suffering from bladder cancer, so it's no surprise that he might choose this moment to look back.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Steve Appleford
The sideshow at Dodger Stadium is about to begin as Paul Stanley emerges from his backstage trailer, shirtless and in full kabuki drag: bright red lips, his face painted harlequin white, a black star over his right eye. The singer-guitarist is here to perform with his band KISS but hears his name and walks over to a crowd gathered at the fence. " Arriba !" yells one fan, and Stanley reaches over to shake hands, as dozens of cellphones take snapshots. "Let me see your shoes!" shouts another, and Stanley half-climbs the fence to swing a tasseled silver-and-black platform boot over the top. "Thanks, Paul!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In college, I once wrote a paper arguing that rock 'n' roll songs were poetry in sonic form. I was not, at the time, aware of Richard Goldstein's 1972 anthology “The Poetry of Rock,” which made a similar case, gathering lyrics and presenting them as verse, but I was under the sway of a cluster of poet/musicians: Lou Reed , Patti Smith , Jim Carroll , even Jim Morrison , whose posthumous spoken word record “An American Prayer” I...
WORLD
February 3, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM--The debate over Scarlett Johansson's Super Bowl ad has hit The Wall. The actress' ad for SodaStream, an Israeli company that does some of its manufacturing in the West Bank, has kicked off a rock 'n' roll battle pitting Israel's rock community against Pink Floyd's Roger Waters. The ad for SodaStream, whose kitchen appliances turn tap water into seltzer, drew the ire of activists who support a boycott of products made in Israeli-occupied territories. It prompted Waters to post an open letter to Johansson on Facebook, challenging her decision to endorse an Israeli company and posing a long list of questions about Israel's treatment of Palestinians.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Steve Appleford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pirate at the end of the bar is absorbed in a game of chance, tapping at a video-game console through virtual dice, cards, puzzles and music trivia between sips of bourbon and Coke. Lemmy Kilmister, the iconic frontman for the hard-rock band Motörhead, feeds more money into the machine. "You win some, you lose some, it's all the same to me," he says with a grin, quoting his own song "Ace of Spades. " This is a favorite pastime for the man in black, spending another afternoon and evening at the Rainbow Bar & Grill, his neighborhood pub on the Sunset Strip.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2010 | By Charlie Amter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's one of the most enduring rock 'n' roll clichés: Fame slips away from an aging band, so its members go abroad and discover a whole new fan base, becoming "big in Japan. " Photographer Brad Elterman is very familiar with the way this works, having shot rock bands back in the 1970s and '80s. But then he went to Japan, and it happened to him too. The L.A.-based shutterbug, whose early life loosely mirrors that of the main character in Cameron Crowe's "Almost Famous," just returned from an exhibition of his work in a group show at Tokyo's trendy Tabloid gallery, where 300 or so fans, many of whom follow the Sherman Oaks-born artist's work via his Tumblr page, turned up last week.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Thank you, Lonely Planet, for one of the best musical compilations around: the Top 40 Rock 'n' Roll Travel Sites . Why should any dedicated rock fan go to St. Louis, Zanzibar or the Budokan judo hall in Tokyo? The guidebook company's Robert Reid provides compelling reasons to see all three, but more on that later. The list offers far more than the usual suspects and includes a level of detail that might make rock fans consider taking off on their own round-the-world tour. Reid's travel venues go way back, with the honorable Chuck Berry as the No. 1 chart topper and the reason to go to St. Louis.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Maeve Reston
Jon Huntsman toured Manchester's Elm Street with Mayor Ted Gatsas -- trying some old-fashioned retail politicking in his campaign to be the Republican presidential nominee. After seeing drums in the window of a music store, Huntsman popped in and tried his hand on the keyboard. There were only a handful of voters but nearly a dozen reporters. He took over from a man who was trying out a keyboard toward the front of the store. "How are you? I'm Jon Huntsman. I'm running for president," Huntsman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1985
I have only one thing to say to the "Washington Wives": Wouldn't it be more beneficial for your children if you spent your idle hours thinking of constructive programs for them to participate in rather than worrying about the lyrics of rock 'n' roll????????? LYNN MONTOYA Lawndale
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
It was a homecoming of sorts for Mick Jagger on Tuesday on “The Late Show.” The Rolling Stones singer, in New York for Wednesday night's epic “12-12-12 concert ," first appeared on stage at the Ed Sullivan Theater back on Oct. 25, 1964, as a swaggering, skinny young rock star. Nearly five decades later, he's older, wiser, but the swagger is still very much intact. (And it doesn't look like he's gained a pound, either.) After an introduction by David Letterman, Jagger presented “The Top Ten Things I, Mick Jagger, Have Learned After 50 Years in Rock 'n' Roll.” So what life lessons did he share with viewers?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Twenty or so years ago, Lou Reed - who died Sunday of liver failure at 71 - published a book called “Beyond Thought and Expression: Selected Lyrics” that casts in stark relief the promise and the pretension of thinking about rock lyrics as poetry. Reed, of course, always considered himself in such terms, tracing a lineage to the story writer and poet Delmore Schwartz , who had been his teacher at Syracuse University, creating with the Velvet Underground (and later, in solo efforts such as “Berlin,” “Street Hassle,” “New York” and “Songs for Drella” )
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
What is rock 'n' roll, one may ask upon seeing the names Hall & Oates, Linda Ronstadt, Cat Stevens and Peter Gabriel on this year's list of finalists for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Do any of them truly rock, let alone roll? Or is their music more likely to be filed in the “popular” section of your imaginary record shop? That's one reflexive thought that popped up after seeing the list of nominees for the 2014 induction ceremony. Sixteen acts that make/made music in subgenres including grunge, rap, funk, art pop, neo-soul, guitar rock, progressive rock, soft rock and blues rock, the list offers way more questions than it does answers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Elvis Presley called him up in the middle of the night to thank him for a song. John Lennon went to a banquet just so he could sit next to him. Dion said meeting with him was like "being inside a cubicle with a piano and a genius. " His name was Jerome Felder, but fame reached him under a pseudonym, Doc Pomus. If you care at all about the early days of rock 'n' roll, you either know who Doc Pomus was or count one of his songs as among your favorites: "This Magic Moment," "Save the Last Dance for Me," "Lonely Avenue," "Little Sister," "Viva Las Vegas," "Can't Get Used to Losing You," "A Teenager in Love.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Johnny Laboriel, a legendary Mexican rock 'n' roll singer and icon for the Afro-Mexicano community, has died in Mexico City, a representative said. He was 71. He died early Wednesday at his home after an extended stay in the hospital for treatment of prostate cancer, the Rev. Jose de Jesus Aguilar, who administered the last rites, said via his Twitter account. Laboriel's specialty was to reinterpret American hits of the 1960s, classics like "Poison Ivy" and "Yakety Yak," translated into Spanish and sung with buoyant enthusiasm and an infectious smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal
"Pop star to wig star" - that's how Bob Kretschmer describes his unusual career path. The former member of the band Icehouse now works as an expert wig maker for films including Fox's "Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters" and Sony's "The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones. " "I find the process is the same - music and wig making," he said. "Obviously, it's a different thing you're making, but it's very creative. It's very intense. " Kretschmer, 64, who was born in Australia, traces his fascination with music and hair all the way back to Elvis Presley.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
No one knows better than critics that the one-size-fits-all movie has yet to be made, but every once in a while something comes along that just about everyone is guaranteed to enjoy, and the irresistible documentary "20 Feet From Stardom" is one of those times. Veteran director Morgan Neville has made a moving and joyous behind-the-scenes film about the world of rock 'n' roll backup singers. It's a universe filled with big, bold personalities and the music they make: When you say names like Darlene Love, Merry Clayton and Lisa Fischer, you are conjuring entire universes of sound.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Jon Huntsman, to quote one Eric Clapton, has a rock 'n' roll heart. "My initial passion in life was to be a rock 'n' roll musician," the possible GOP presidential candidate told graduates at the University of South Carolina--an early primary state if you're scoring at home--on Saturday. "In my late teens you wouldn’t have recognized me. My hair was Rod Stewart shaggy; I wouldn’t wear anything but super skinny jeans," he said. "I ended up leaving high school a bit short of graduation to play with a band called Wizard.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In college, I once wrote a paper arguing that rock 'n' roll songs were poetry in sonic form. I was not, at the time, aware of Richard Goldstein's 1972 anthology “The Poetry of Rock,” which made a similar case, gathering lyrics and presenting them as verse, but I was under the sway of a cluster of poet/musicians: Lou Reed , Patti Smith , Jim Carroll , even Jim Morrison , whose posthumous spoken word record “An American Prayer” I...
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Question: Should the greatest rock 'n' roll band in history be history? Or, to put it more bluntly, are the Rolling Stones too old to be rocking and rolling? By now you've read about, heard about or seen photos and video (or heck, maybe you were even there) of the Stones' performance Saturday night at the Echoplex in Echo Park. A lot of Hollywood types and celebs were there: Johnny Depp, Bruce Willis, Gwen Stefani, Owen Wilson -- you get the idea. Regular folks too, ones lucky enough to snag tickets in a quickie lottery.
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