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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Nichols is a freelance writer.
It's anyone's guess whether "Lovelace: A Rock Opera," Anna Waronker and Charlotte Caffey's urgent, tuneful elegy for the star of "Deep Throat," can rival that porn landmark's reach. However, we are undeniably watching something original, at once refined and electrifying. This sense of discovery drives "Lovelace," based on a concept by Jeffery Leonard Bowman, who supplied some of the lyrics. Schematically, it echoes many a popera predecessor -- "Tommy," "Blood Brothers," pick a Lloyd Webber.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By Hannah Fry
A drama teacher at Corona del Mar High School who was placed on leave in June after a student accused him of battery has resigned. Ron Martin, who won accolades from free-speech advocates for fighting to stage a campus production of "Rent," confirmed Tuesday that he left his job last week for health reasons and to avoid having to come before the school district's review board. "I'm disappointed that it happened this way," said Martin, 57. "From what I understood, I was guilty and had to prove my innocence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1990 | T. H. McCULLOH
Even before glasnost, a new voice of intellectual freedom in the Soviet Union was being heard. The sound of that voice is very evident in "Junon and Avos--The Hope," the first Russian rock opera, which was a smash hit in 1981 at Moscow's Lenin Komsomol Theater, and opened last weekend at Manhattan's City Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. Four of the key bands from the 1960s British Invasion were represented Friday in Anaheim when the Who's lead guitarist and main songwriter, Pete Townshend, was given the Les Paul Award at the annual TEC Awards ceremony, part of the annual NAMM music products convention . Townshend was serenaded by Eric Burdon of the Animals, who sang “The Seeker,” while ex-Beatle Paul McCartney...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1987 | CATHY DE MAYO
In 1969 the rock opera "Tommy" was a phenomenon. In 1987 it is a period curiosity. Much of its original power lay in its novelty as an art form, but much of its appeal today relies on nostalgia, as can be seen in the current production at Saddleback College. The rock still rolls, but the opera limps. "Tommy" has a place in rock history as the ground-breaking effort by the British rock band the Who to produce an album that told a story through the musical idiom of the day.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1987 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Some rock historians may argue the point, but for all intents the Who's "Tommy" was the quintessential rock opera of the 1960s, almost single-handedly defining the form upon its release in 1969. "Tommy" made musical history again the following year when the Who performed the work in its entirety in New York, becoming the first rock group to play the hallowed Metropolitan Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Theater is being there. It was exciting to celebrate the 20th anniversary of "Tommy" with the Who at the Universal Amphitheatre Thursday night--as much for the audience as for the show. I know: It is the normal state of affairs at a rock concert that the crowd seethes and bubbles and never sits down for long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1997
No stars were going to be made Friday. But they lined up anyway--singers and actors, students and bankers. Carrying sheet music, resumes and the occasional guitar, hundreds of twentysomethings lined up in Burbank for the first of two days of auditions for "Rent," the rock opera that took Broadway by storm last year. Inspired by Puccini's "La Boheme," but set among aspiring artists in the East Village, "Rent" won Tony awards for best musical, book and score.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Even at a benefit concert like Thursday's star-studded performance of "Tommy," put on by the Who at the Universal Amphitheatre, it's easy to find cynics. Mindful of the current Who tour's controversial brewery sponsorship, one wag suggested that maybe the rock opera's troubled title character could appear in a beer commercial--as in, maybe, "That deaf, dumb and blind kid sure can knock 'em back!" Cheap shot. Uncalled for. Irascible.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Manchester, England Seb HUNTER'S "Rock Me Amadeus" hooked me the moment I opened it in a Manchester bookshop and saw its epigraph, a quote from Elvis: "I don't know anything about music. In my line, you don't have to." Later in the book, when Hunter gets around to opera, this good-natured British rock journalist -- hoping to get a handle on Handel and classical music in general -- likens Wagner to U2 playing Meat Loaf at Neverland.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By David Ng
The new movie version of "Les Misérables," which opened on Christmas, has given fans of the original stage musical a reason to revisit their old cast albums and reminisce about the Broadway show. Songwriters Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil hit the jackpot with the musical -- and they are likely to continue raking in the dough with the new film. Audiences who have seen the movie may be curious to know what the writers did before "Les Misérables," which wasn't their first stab at a big, showy production.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Who Am I A Memoir Pete Townshend Harper: 544 pp., $32.50 Pete Townshend has always been rock 'n' roll's reluctant warrior. The driving force behind the legendary band the Who, Townshend revolutionized rock with his guitar and pen. He wrote numerous anthems, including "My Generation," "See Me, Feel Me," "Baba O' Reilly" and "Won't Get Fooled Again," and, when he wasn't smashing guitars, embraced his role as the thinking man's...
NEWS
September 4, 2012
 Cirque du Soleil has taken a turn for the weird: The entertainment behemoth's latest spectacular, “Zarkana,” follows a magician through a Dali-esque landscape as he attempts to regain his lover and powers. The acrobatic rock opera features 75 surreal circus performers, as well as Cirque's trademark high-flying trapeze and balancing acts. “Zarkana” opens Nov. 9 at Aria Resort & Casino with performances Friday through Tuesday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Tickets start at $69. - Jamie Wetherbe, Custom Publishing Writer   “Zarkana” Cirque du Soleil  Aria Resort & Casino  866.359.7111 www.arialasvegas.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Mary, the mother of Jesus, needs no introduction to much of humankind. But the "other Mary" of the New Testament - or "Marys," as the case may be - is a more elusive figure. So when composer John Adams' new oratorio-opera "The Gospel According to the Other Mary" had its world premiere in May at Walt Disney Concert Hall, it touched off a lively discussion among a handful of religious scholars and bloggers . At issue is a matter that has divided biblical students for centuries and once prompted a ruling by Pope St. Gregory I the Great.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012
UNDERRATED 'Borgen' on LinkTV : Viewers drawn into AMC's "The Killing" (adapted from the taut Danish import, "Forbrydelsen") should seek out the similar aesthetics of this political drama, a Denmark-born twist on "The West Wing" covering European politics, the media and a cunning prime minister, played by Sidse Babett Knudsen. Plus, with NBC reportedly working on an adaptation, you can get onboard before the series (with English subtitles) shoots itself in the foot in the States.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2009 | DAN NEIL
The San Francisco powerhouse agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners takes as its corporate mantra "art serving capitalism." But I wonder if it shouldn't be the other way around? I give you -- with a plate of chocolate chip cookies -- "Battle for Milkquarious," a 20-minute Web-only "rock opera" by GSP featuring the exploits of White Gold, the doofus-y guitar-strutter/pitchman for the California Milk Processor Board (the "Got Milk?" people). We met White Gold in previous commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | FREDERICK M. WINSHIP, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
The American premiere of "Junon and Avos--The Hope," the Soviet Union's first rock opera, is more of an ego trip for presenter Pierre Cardin than an artistic success. Advertised as "the first hit of the decade," this avant-garde work made its debut at Moscow's Lenin Komsomol Theater in 1981 and was picked up two years later by Cardin, the French fashion designer and theatrical promoter, for his Espace Cardin theater in Paris, where it was something of a sensation.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Dennis McLellan is a Times staff writer who regularly writes about comedy for OC Live!
Comic ventriloquist Taylor Mason is getting back to his musical roots in a big way at the Brea Improv, teaming up with song parodist and cartoon-voice whiz Mark McCollum in a show dubbed "A Comic Rock Opera." "It's a theatrical show," Mason explained from his home in Thousand Oaks last week. "I'd say the show is 60 to 70% music. It is song parodies done in a rock-opera style, but it's not just rock and roll--there's blues, reggae, some country and sing-alongs."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009
Regarding the piece on the rock opera "American Idiot": ["From 'Idiot' to Opera," Sept. 13] All those talented people lending their voices do not compare to one Billie Joe Armstrong, but this is not about Green Day. This is a tribute to their work through the eyes of one man, Michael Mayer. As with "21st Century Breakdown," this is a case of platinum ideas served on a silver platter. I believe its success is due to the fact that the "American Idiot" phenomenon was pulled from mass media before its time and has left the public thirsty for more.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2009 | John Horn
Michael Mayer tried to contain his growing frustration. For more than nine hours at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre over two recent afternoons, Mayer's creative group was laboring to fix the glitches that were making a mess of a key sequence in the world premiere rock opera "American Idiot." Progress was fleeting. For the two days of technical rehearsals, director Mayer and his team were stuck revising just three minutes of the show -- an elaborate fantasy dance passage in the adaptation of the pop-punk band Green Day's Grammy-winning 2004 album of the same name.
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