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Rock The Vote Organization

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June 1, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rock music and MTV--the very entities that many parents view as the anti-Establishment nuisances that distract their teen-age children from life's serious matters--are pushing their young fans to participate in mainstream politics. Rock the Vote, an organization created by the music industry two years ago to combat the censorship of rock lyrics, has labored throughout this primary season to register young voters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2004 | Randy Lewis
With predictions that young voters could decide the presidential election in November, efforts are shifting into high gear to get Americans under 30 registered and taking part in the political process. And with the Grammy Awards coming Sunday, such efforts within the music industry are especially ratcheting up this week. A DJs Rock the Vote show Thursday at Avalon Hollywood with Paul Van Dyk will promote voter participation to the dance and electronic music communities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2004 | Randy Lewis
With predictions that young voters could decide the presidential election in November, efforts are shifting into high gear to get Americans under 30 registered and taking part in the political process. And with the Grammy Awards coming Sunday, such efforts within the music industry are especially ratcheting up this week. A DJs Rock the Vote show Thursday at Avalon Hollywood with Paul Van Dyk will promote voter participation to the dance and electronic music communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2003 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
They're not normally even in the same universe, CNN viewers -- median age: 61 -- and the Rock the Vote crowd, the 18- to 24-year-olds whom the nonpartisan nonprofit works to engage in the political process. Still, organizers are hoping they can make the two worlds collide on Tuesday in Boston, in what's being billed as the first-ever debate among multiple candidates before an audience exclusively made up of young people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A parade of big-name pop music stars, from Madonna to Michael Stipe, have stared into the camera to endorse Rock the Vote since its birth in 1990, but no famous face has been more closely associated with the youth voter registration effort than its greatest beneficiary, President Bill Clinton. In the wake of the 1992 election, that identification was cause for celebration. In 1999, however . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2003 | Elizabeth Jensen, Times Staff Writer
They're not normally even in the same universe, CNN viewers -- median age: 61 -- and the Rock the Vote crowd, the 18- to 24-year-olds whom the nonpartisan nonprofit works to engage in the political process. Still, organizers are hoping they can make the two worlds collide on Tuesday in Boston, in what's being billed as the first-ever debate among multiple candidates before an audience exclusively made up of young people.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leave it to Madonna. Who else could transform the simple act of voting into a provocative display of sexual innuendo? On Monday at 10 p.m., MTV will debut the pop siren's latest video clip: a 60-second, rap-oriented public service advertisement in which she encourages her fans to express themselves at the voting booth: Dr. King, Malcom X Freedom of speech Is as good as sex . Madonna delivers the rhyme wearing red bikini underwear with an American flag curled around her shoulders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Bell didn't quite fit in the demographic pool that MTV, the music video channel, was hoping to attract Saturday at Cal State Northridge. The 45-year-old dad, who has more than 25 years of voting under his belt, was drawn to the scene after leaving his son at a nearby soccer game. "I just saw this political stuff and said 'Whoa, dude, this is my kind of stuff,' " said Bell, a self-described political junkie.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1995 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rock the Vote, the political organization born within the pop music industry in 1990 to fight censorship, took pride in its efforts to prod young, mostly apathetic adults to realize that they too had a stake in the political system of this country. Teamed with MTV's coverage of the 1992 political campaign, the group helped register thousands of young voters at rock concerts and special urban sign-up drives, many of whom then voted for the first time.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
CNN, which has marketed itself as an outlet for serious news, planted a question about computer preferences at last week's debate of the Democratic presidential candidates, according to the student who posed the query and on Monday wrote about it in an online forum of Brown University's Daily Herald. During the debate, cosponsored by the nonprofit Rock the Vote organization, Alexandra Trustman asked the candidates whether they preferred the PC or Mac format for their computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A parade of big-name pop music stars, from Madonna to Michael Stipe, have stared into the camera to endorse Rock the Vote since its birth in 1990, but no famous face has been more closely associated with the youth voter registration effort than its greatest beneficiary, President Bill Clinton. In the wake of the 1992 election, that identification was cause for celebration. In 1999, however . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Bell didn't quite fit in the demographic pool that MTV, the music video channel, was hoping to attract Saturday at Cal State Northridge. The 45-year-old dad, who has more than 25 years of voting under his belt, was drawn to the scene after leaving his son at a nearby soccer game. "I just saw this political stuff and said 'Whoa, dude, this is my kind of stuff,' " said Bell, a self-described political junkie.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1995 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rock the Vote, the political organization born within the pop music industry in 1990 to fight censorship, took pride in its efforts to prod young, mostly apathetic adults to realize that they too had a stake in the political system of this country. Teamed with MTV's coverage of the 1992 political campaign, the group helped register thousands of young voters at rock concerts and special urban sign-up drives, many of whom then voted for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rock music and MTV--the very entities that many parents view as the anti-Establishment nuisances that distract their teen-age children from life's serious matters--are pushing their young fans to participate in mainstream politics. Rock the Vote, an organization created by the music industry two years ago to combat the censorship of rock lyrics, has labored throughout this primary season to register young voters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leave it to Madonna. Who else could transform the simple act of voting into a provocative display of sexual innuendo? On Monday at 10 p.m., MTV will debut the pop siren's latest video clip: a 60-second, rap-oriented public service advertisement in which she encourages her fans to express themselves at the voting booth: Dr. King, Malcom X Freedom of speech Is as good as sex . Madonna delivers the rhyme wearing red bikini underwear with an American flag curled around her shoulders.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1994
A long-rumored shake-up at MTV has finally happened, with Judy McGrath, recently appointed sole president of the music channel, naming a new executive team and reorganizing the music departments. Rich Eigendorff was named executive vice president, business operations, and Doug Herzog was named executive vice president, production and programming. In addition, John Cannelli was named to the new job of senior vice president, music program development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
The crowd on the lawn Wednesday at Cal State Fullerton's Becker Amphitheater wanted to hear more music, not listen to political comedian Andy Kindler. But when Kindler urged them to vote for anyone or thing that runs against George Bush in the presidential election, he got a big cheer. "I don't care if (Bush's opponent) is a kitchen appliance," Kindler said. "Vote for the toaster--it works, it accepts all kinds of bread."
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