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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1999
The 1999 Nobel prizes for medicine and chemistry recognize two researchers who have greatly enhanced scientists' ability to see and manipulate down to the level of the atom. On Monday, the Swedish Academy awarded the medicine prize to Guenter Blobel of New York City's Rockefeller University for discovering how yeast, plant and animal cells send molecules to "the right address" by reading a kind of ZIP code in a stretch of protein. On Tuesday the academy honored Caltech's Ahmed H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For the first half of the 20th century, the cell was a mysterious, unfathomable entity. Nutrients went in and hormones, wastes and other products came out. But what happened in between was anybody's guess. Light microscopes could reveal the rough details of the cell's interior, but not with enough precision to illuminate function. Chemical studies were rudimentary at best. Three men changed that. Albert Claude of the Rockefeller Institute - now University - adapted the electron microscope to image cells, allowing a much higher resolution.
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NATIONAL
June 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Philanthropist David Rockefeller is celebrating his 90th birthday by donating $100 million to Rockefeller University, the Manhattan school founded by his grandfather, the Standard Oil Co. magnate. Rockefeller, whose birthday is Sunday, is listed by Forbes magazine as one of the 100 wealthiest Americans, with an estimated fortune of $2.5 billion. He plans to join family members in southern France for a big birthday bash.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Philanthropist David Rockefeller is celebrating his 90th birthday by donating $100 million to Rockefeller University, the Manhattan school founded by his grandfather, the Standard Oil Co. magnate. Rockefeller, whose birthday is Sunday, is listed by Forbes magazine as one of the 100 wealthiest Americans, with an estimated fortune of $2.5 billion. He plans to join family members in southern France for a big birthday bash.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the years, scientists at Rockefeller University--one of the world's preeminent research institutions--have identified DNA, found the first cancer virus, grown the malaria parasite and wrestled with some of biology's most complex problems. Now, they are trying to solve their most terrifying mystery: Who may be trying to kill them?
BOOKS
August 15, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
KIPPER'S GAME: A Novel by Barbara Ehrenreich (Farrar, Straus, Giroux: $22; 310 pp.). Given the plot line, this novel should be a spy thriller. A computer hacker disappears: a university administrator asks a biologist to dig up obscure Nazi research; a mysterious Mexican philanthropist offers to give the university a lot of money, and suddenly the biologist is being followed, threatened and pressed to reveal his findings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For the first half of the 20th century, the cell was a mysterious, unfathomable entity. Nutrients went in and hormones, wastes and other products came out. But what happened in between was anybody's guess. Light microscopes could reveal the rough details of the cell's interior, but not with enough precision to illuminate function. Chemical studies were rudimentary at best. Three men changed that. Albert Claude of the Rockefeller Institute - now University - adapted the electron microscope to image cells, allowing a much higher resolution.
SCIENCE
June 9, 2004 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
Rockefeller University brought to a close one of the most contentious science disputes of the last quarter century Tuesday by bestowing an honorary degree on Nobel laureate David Baltimore, embracing an outspoken biologist who resigned the school's presidency in disgrace 13 years ago. Baltimore, now president of Caltech, was a central figure in a fierce controversy over scientific fraud.
HEALTH
December 6, 2010 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When I tell people I'm on a high-carbohydrate diet, they give me a highly skeptical look, as if I just told them the moon landing was faked. From a pure weight-loss perspective, I could eat nothing but bacon-wrapped sticks of butter topped with chocolate-covered Froot Loops, and as long as I maintained a caloric deficit I would lose weight. This concept has been proved time and again, most recently by the Twinkie Guy. Twinkie Guy ? also known as Mark Haub, a professor of human nutrition at Kansas State University ?
NEWS
December 12, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Dr. Clara Lynch, a prominent cancer and aging researcher credited with introducing Swiss mice into American laboratories, died Sunday at an Alexandria, Va., nursing home, Rockefeller University officials said. She was 103. She was believed to be the first researcher to prove that susceptibility to the development of tumors in the lungs and mammary glands of mice can be passed on to offspring.
SCIENCE
June 9, 2004 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
Rockefeller University brought to a close one of the most contentious science disputes of the last quarter century Tuesday by bestowing an honorary degree on Nobel laureate David Baltimore, embracing an outspoken biologist who resigned the school's presidency in disgrace 13 years ago. Baltimore, now president of Caltech, was a central figure in a fierce controversy over scientific fraud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1999
The 1999 Nobel prizes for medicine and chemistry recognize two researchers who have greatly enhanced scientists' ability to see and manipulate down to the level of the atom. On Monday, the Swedish Academy awarded the medicine prize to Guenter Blobel of New York City's Rockefeller University for discovering how yeast, plant and animal cells send molecules to "the right address" by reading a kind of ZIP code in a stretch of protein. On Tuesday the academy honored Caltech's Ahmed H.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the years, scientists at Rockefeller University--one of the world's preeminent research institutions--have identified DNA, found the first cancer virus, grown the malaria parasite and wrestled with some of biology's most complex problems. Now, they are trying to solve their most terrifying mystery: Who may be trying to kill them?
BOOKS
August 15, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
KIPPER'S GAME: A Novel by Barbara Ehrenreich (Farrar, Straus, Giroux: $22; 310 pp.). Given the plot line, this novel should be a spy thriller. A computer hacker disappears: a university administrator asks a biologist to dig up obscure Nazi research; a mysterious Mexican philanthropist offers to give the university a lot of money, and suddenly the biologist is being followed, threatened and pressed to reveal his findings.
NEWS
October 10, 1989
Alexander Mauro, 68, a Rockefeller University biophysicist who helped develop the radio frequency cardiac pacemaker. The New Haven, Conn., native stayed in his hometown to receive a bachelor's degree from Yale University in 1942 and his doctorate in biophysics in 1950. He joined the faculty of the Yale School of Medicine in 1951, starting a collaboration with cardiac surgeon William W. L. Glenn.
NEWS
December 11, 1986
Genetic variations have been found that may eventually help identify people who are at high risk of heart disease, scientists said. Researchers from Rockefeller University in New York said the variations occur in or near the gene that produces a key protein that carries cholesterol through the bloodstream. In their report in today's New England Journal of Medicine, the scientists said that variations in this gene "may be a new and independent risk factor" in heart attacks.
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