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Rockers Against Drunk Driving

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
First there was MADD--Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Then there was SADD--Students Against Drunk Driving. Now there is RADD--Rockers Against Drunk Driving. Is it all just becoming a fad? No way, said heavy-metal singer Ronnie James Dio. "It's not the call letters that are important, it's the message inside. No one wants to see anyone else killed, especially for the stupid reason of a driver being drunk."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
First there was MADD--Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Then there was SADD--Students Against Drunk Driving. Now there is RADD--Rockers Against Drunk Driving. Is it all just becoming a fad? No way, said heavy-metal singer Ronnie James Dio. "It's not the call letters that are important, it's the message inside. No one wants to see anyone else killed, especially for the stupid reason of a driver being drunk."
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December 9, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Don't drink and drive, say members of the groups Jan & Dean, Heart, Quiet Riot, White Lion, Toto and (guitarist Ace) Frehley's Comet, as well as Paula Abdul, Jon Butcher, Barbie Benton and Jeff (Skunk) Baxter, who on Thursday recorded audio and video spots to kick of the 1988 holiday campaign of Recording Artists Against Drunk Driving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
In an attempt to reduce the number of alcohol-related accidents on Los Angeles roads this holiday season, an organization of entertainment professionals will launch a six-week, music-driven campaign aimed at persuading young adults to use designated drivers. The campaign, "LA Challenge," features a "designated driver's license," which can be redeemed for free nonalcoholic drinks, discounts and other rewards at more than 150 participating L.A.-area businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Harry Nilsson, who gained fame with his rendition of the hit "Everybody's Talkin' " in the 1969 movie "Midnight Cowboy" and whose quirky tunes such as "Me and My Arrow" endeared him to the Beatles, died of an apparent heart attack early Saturday. He was 52. Nilsson, who had never fully recovered from a heart attack he suffered in February, died in his sleep at his Agoura Hills home, said David Spero, his manager.
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