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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1990 | JONATHAN GOLD
Some long hair was tossed, a well-muscled lead singer named Spike found a way to remove his shirt midway through the first song, a whammy bar shrieked NNNGAOOOWWww- wee- wee-wee! But what the Orange County band Mind Over Four played at the club Hollywood Live on Thursday was far more dissonant than anything you'd expect from journeyman hard-rockers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1989 | DON WALLER
FIREHOSE "fROMOHIO." SST . 1/2 Guitarist and singer Ed Crawford is, like this recording, a product of Ohio, and the San Pedro-based power trio's third LP finds them aiming for a straight-to-the-heartland message. They balance their familiar dice 'n' slice, genre-leapin' riffin' with more straightforward song structures, ranging from the edgy "What Gets Heard" and the jittery Latino funk of "In My Mind" to the road-dog rockers "Time With You" and "Some Things" to the anthemic "The Softest Hammer."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1986 | STEVE POND
"JOHN EDDIE." Columbia. Max Weinberg's drums pound, the songs build to big, emotional climaxes and the singer's got a lump in his throat as big as Asbury Park. In other words, here's Another Jersey Rocker with more than a superficial resemblance to you-know-who. Eddie's style is simpler and less ambitious: He alternates odes to lost love with chunky, sassy riff-rockers and writes more about youthful lust and heartbreak than the streets of his hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1986 | RICHARD CROMELIN
When Iggy Pop (then Iggy Stooge) whirled out of Detroit in the late '60s dancing like James Brown and singing his cranked-up white suburban blues, he came on as a nightmare offspring of American culture, a vision of the heartland gone haywire. He hit the rock world like a fragment of anti-matter trailing a comet's tail of debris. His confrontational performances and crude intensity formed the foundations of heavy-metal, and he embodied the attitude that would later crystallize as punk.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1987 | STEVE POND
* * * "GYPSY BLOOD." Mason Ruffner. CBS Associated. If the success of Robert Cray and the Fabulous Thunderbirds means that record buyers are developing a taste for blues-based American rock 'n' roll, Mason Ruffner deserves to be that audience's next discovery. On his second album, the Texas-based guitarist, singer and songwriter stomps his way through a batch of greasy, trashy roadhouse rockers, some of them dressed up in synthesizers and other modern duds.
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