Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRocket Engines
IN THE NEWS

Rocket Engines

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 23, 2005 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Boeing Co. said Tuesday that it had agreed to sell its Rocketdyne rocket engine manufacturing business in San Fernando Valley to United Technologies Corp. for about $700 million in cash. The sale of storied Rocketdyne, which helped pioneer space exploration in the 1960s, was expected, and came amid Boeing's struggle to turn a profit in the space launch business. For Hartford, Conn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
About 150 employees at rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne in Canoga Park were told Wednesday that they would be laid off as part of a companywide reduction that the company says is related to last year's merger. Aerojet Rocketdyne was created by the sale of Rocketdyne to GenCorp Inc. for $550 million, a deal that was finalized last summer. It brought together two major California rocket companies - and longtime competitors. GenCorp already owned Aerojet, the Sacramento aerospace firm founded in 1942.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1985 | ALLAN JALON, Times Staff Writer
In a concrete bunker on a crest in the Santa Susana Mountains, two men peer through binoculars and out of green-tinted glass that darkens their faces. In another bunker, computer consoles wait to record what is about to happen. Between the two structures, a huge metal scaffold embraces a rocket engine. Its nozzle's wide end faces downward, shrouded in vapor. A countdown begins: 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. Instead of the beauty of flight comes a frightening concentration of sheer power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Frederick N. Rasmussen
Robert S. Kraemer, NASA's former director of planetary exploration who was also an expert in rocket engines, died Aug. 20 at an assisted living home in Catonsville, Md., of complications from a fall, his family said. He was 84. Kraemer joined NASA in 1967 and, in one of his early assignments, managed the development of a Mars surface laboratory mission at NASA's headquarters in Washington. After the project was canceled because of congressional concerns, he was appointed manager of advanced planetary programs and technology and in 1970 was named director of planetary programs.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Rocketdyne is stinging from cutbacks in NASA's budget, a rival aerospace firm has set up a joint venture with a Russian company that could threaten Rocketdyne's lucrative business making rocket engines for commercial and military satellite launches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Frederick N. Rasmussen
Robert S. Kraemer, NASA's former director of planetary exploration who was also an expert in rocket engines, died Aug. 20 at an assisted living home in Catonsville, Md., of complications from a fall, his family said. He was 84. Kraemer joined NASA in 1967 and, in one of his early assignments, managed the development of a Mars surface laboratory mission at NASA's headquarters in Washington. After the project was canceled because of congressional concerns, he was appointed manager of advanced planetary programs and technology and in 1970 was named director of planetary programs.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1989
Rockwell International Co. in Canoga Park won a $286,199 contract from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop a health management system for rocket engines.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia said it would go ahead with a $250-million contract to sell rocket engines to India despite a U.S. warning that this could lead to trade penalties for both countries. "We are going to confirm within this contract our obligations . . .," Russian First Deputy Prime Minister Gennady E. Burbulis told a news conference in New Delhi. He also said Russian President Boris Yeltsin would visit India in the second half of this year and sign a friendship treaty.
NEWS
July 8, 1995
Samuel K. Hoffman, 93, an engineer who directed development of liquid fuel rocket engines that launched the nation's first satellite and moon-bound Apollo spacecraft. Joining North American Aviation in 1949, Hoffman became general manager and later president of a new division, which Hoffman named Rocketdyne, now a division of Rockwell International Corp. Hoffman oversaw development of the Redstone propulsion system used in 1958 to launch Explorer I, the first U.S.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
About 150 employees at rocket engine maker Aerojet Rocketdyne in Canoga Park were told Wednesday that they would be laid off as part of a companywide reduction that the company says is related to last year's merger. Aerojet Rocketdyne was created by the sale of Rocketdyne to GenCorp Inc. for $550 million, a deal that was finalized last summer. It brought together two major California rocket companies - and longtime competitors. GenCorp already owned Aerojet, the Sacramento aerospace firm founded in 1942.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
Aerospace and technology firm GenCorp Inc. of Rancho Cordova, Calif. has closed the acquisition deal of rocket engine maker Rocketdyne and named executives to head the new company. GenCorp also owns Aerojet, the Sacramento aerospace firm founded in 1942. So the $550-million purchase of Rocketdyne to GenCorp marks the combination of two iconic rocket companies -- and longtime competitors. The newly formed company is now Aerojet Rocketdyne Inc. and based in Sacramento. It includes more than 5,300 employees at 16 sites across the U.S. and throughout the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The Chumash tribe has expressed interest in buying a 450-acre slice of a contaminated nuclear research facility in the hills between the Simi and San Fernando valleys, hoping to preserve a cave that its members consider sacred. The tribe's inquiries about acquiring part of the 2,849-acre Santa Susana Field Laboratory have stirred concern among some residents who fear the purchase might be a back door to building a casino. "I very much respect their desire to protect sacred sites but I want to make sure any such action precludes the establishment of a casino," Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks said.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
One of the nine engines on SpaceX's massive Falcon 9 rocket experienced a problem and shut down during last night's launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., company officials said. The anomaly occurred about 1 minute, 19 seconds into the flight. Check it out in the video here or below. "Initial data suggests that one of the rocket's nine Merlin engines, Engine 1, lost pressure suddenly and an engine shutdown command was issued immediately," SpaceX said in comment. The rocket is designed to handle an engine flameout and is slated to complete its mission, SpaceX said.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, the pioneering rocket engine manufacturing business in the San Fernando Valley, has been sold by its parent company of seven years to Sacramento aerospace and technology firm GenCorp Inc. for $550 million. The sale of Rocketdyne to GenCorp marks the combination of two iconic California rocket companies - and longtime competitors. GenCorp also owns Aerojet, the Sacramento aerospace firm founded in 1942. The deal is the latest chapter of consolidation in the aerospace industry, which has unfolded over the last two decades and has cost tens of thousands of jobs throughout the Southland.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
SpaceX has delayed its historic rocket launch to the International Space Station yet again. The launch date, which has been pushed back several times already, is now set for May 19. The company, formally known as Space Exploration Technologies Corp., was slated to blast off May 7 from Cape Canaveral , Fla., in a demonstration flight for NASA . Three or four days after launch, the company is set to make history if it docks with...
BUSINESS
March 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, the rocket engine manufacturing business in the San Fernando Valley that helped pioneer space exploration in the 1960s, is officially up for sale by its parent company. With headquarters in Canoga Park, Rocketdyne builds rocket engines at a sprawling 47-acre facility near the Westfield Topanga shopping mall. The company is perhaps best known as the maker of the space shuttles' main rocket engines. But it also develops engines for military rockets and missiles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the first major U.S. rocketry laboratory in the postwar era, a 300-foot-tall steel structure that looked more like a gigantic Erector set than a major rocket testing site. But at Vertical Test Stand-1 in Simi Hills, scientists experimented with the nation's first large rocket engines that would propel man into space. Now, the landmark in the west San Fernando Valley is slated for demolition later this year. It will mark the end of an era in American space exploration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sentimental link to America's earliest experimentatmens with the massive rockets that would later carry astronauts into space is about to be severed with the razing of the first commercial testing station in Southern California. Vertical Test Stand-1 in the Simi Hills was where German expatriate scientists and American engineers mastered the complexities of rocket technology in a high-stakes, Cold War-era race for space and missile supremacy with the Soviet Union.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Bob Kahl slips in through a side door of the vast, abandoned hangar and looks at what's left of the assembly plant where he worked for nearly 40 years. He remembers the hum of power tools, the biting aroma of cutting oil, swarms of workers plugging away on a labyrinth of yellow scaffolding. All that's left is a few piles of broken concrete and a sea of colorless dust that coats a Palmdale factory floor the size of two football fields. "Welcome to the birthplace of America's space shuttle fleet," said Kahl, 60, smiling.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|