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SPORTS
February 23, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
It was the last chance in the last game of the last basketball season Ryan Elmquist would ever experience, and the boy wonder wondered. He recorded a perfect score on his ACT exam. He is graduating from Caltech this spring with a computer science degree. He has landed a job as a software engineer at Google. But could he make a free throw? Could he make one unguarded shot to give the Caltech basketball team a victory that would end a 310-game conference losing streak stretched back 26 years?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Pioneering rocket scientist Yvonne Brill often referred to herself as an "only" - as in the sole woman in the room at a time when female scientists and engineers were exceedingly few. Brill began her career in 1945 and eventually developed a revolutionary propulsion system that remains the industry standard for keeping unmanned spacecraft in constant, stationary orbit. Later in her career, she became the director of the space shuttle's solid rocket motor program for NASA. In the last quarter-century of her life, she strove to help others pursue careers in science and math and especially pushed for women to achieve scientific recognition.
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SPORTS
July 19, 1997 | TRIS WYKES
You don't have to be a rocket scientist to help run American Legion baseball, although that's exactly what Mel Swerdling was before he retired early to become the District 20 commissioner. No, you just need a tireless work ethic, bottomless patience and an iron will. "You need to be an engineer and a lawyer to do this job," said Swerdling, in his 23rd year overseeing the district. Like virtually everyone associated with the Legion program, Swerdling is a volunteer.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | Times staff reports
Times editors Mike James and John Cherwa will discuss the decision by billionaire Philip Anschutz to withdraw the sale of AEG, the entertainment giant that controls the Staples Center, LA Live and the Los Angeles Kings. Anschutz said he plans to resume a more active role in the company. He announced in September that he was seeking bidders in a sale that some insiders said could fetch $7 billion. He'll be doing this without his top executive, Tim Leiweke, who is leaving AEG by "mutual agreement.
SPORTS
May 28, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Not since Phil Conley won the NCAA title in 1956 and went on to compete at the Melbourne Olympics has Caltech had a javelin thrower the caliber of Kristen Zortman. She will compete today in the NCAA Division III national championships at Waverly, Iowa, becoming the first Caltech undergraduate to compete in an NCAA meet in nearly a decade.
SPORTS
May 23, 2011 | By Gary Klein
Bruce Bochy wants balance. Don Mattingly puts a premium on protection. And Mike Scioscia attempts to identify and capitalize on groupings. When it comes to building a batting order, they and other major league managers all desire the same result: peak production throughout the lineup. "It's not rocket science," Scioscia said. However, lineup construction can occasionally be volatile. Early this season, the baseball world was atwitter when Boston Red Sox Manager Terry Francona dropped struggling big-money acquisition Carl Crawford to the No. 7 slot.
FOOD
September 16, 1993 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES FOOD MANAGING EDITOR
It used to be, back in my cocksure neophyte cooking teacher days, that I would laugh merrily when people asked, "Is cooking difficult?" "No," I would chortle, patting them on the head. "It's not rocket science and there is no heavy lifting. Anyone can cook." I now formally and heartily apologize. Of course, it is true that anyone can cook. Literally true, anyway, just as it's literally true that any of us can sing a song, write an article or plant a garden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1996 | CATHY WERBLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Students at McGaugh Elementary School will turn a $1.49 package of orange California poppy seeds into a science experiment next week when the space shuttle Columbia carries their payload on a 16-day mission. The school, the first in Orange County to fly an experiment on the space shuttle and one of only a few elementary schools ever to undertake such an endeavor, was selected for the Friday mission by Instrumentation Technology Associates. The Exeter, Pa.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman writes about pop music for The Times
It's probably a little late to be complaining about the "dumbing-down" of rock 'n' roll--about 35 or more years late, given that the stuff wasn't constructed on a cornerstone of rocket science. With many exceptions along the way, rock has had as some of its lasting hallmarks exaggerated emotionalism, short-sighted rebellion, freeze-frame juvenilia and even outright anti-intellectualism, and--as "Saturday Night Live's" Stuart Smalley would consolingly add--that's OK .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2003 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
At the age of 6, Tiger Francisco and Will Gugerty are rocket scientists -- at least for a day. Poised at a parking lot launch site, hands behind their backs, they start their countdown. Five, four, three, two, one ... blast off. They each push a button, and their solid-fuel rockets, handmade by each child, ignite, whizzing into the sky at 70 mph and reaching about 200 feet before floating back to Earth hanging from parachutes.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2012 | W.J. Hennigan
Inside one of the bustling ramshackle hangars at the Mojave Air & Space Port, 23-year-old Kyle Nyberg is tightening dozens of stainless-steel nuts that make up the innards of the rocket sitting before him. As the searing desert heat creeps in through an open door, beads of sweat form on Nyberg's brow. Dirt coats his baseball cap and his black gym shoes threaded with neon green laces. Some of his fingers are wrapped with ragged bandages. But the young aeronautical engineer is smiling.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Hey there, media savvy generation -- as we enter the Lenten season, Pope Benedict XVI would like your attention, and he and the Pontifical Council for Social Communications think they know just how to get it: with one Papal tweet a day throughout the 40 days of Lent. After all, as Msgr. Paul Tighe, secretary of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications points out, "many of the key Gospel ideas are readily rendered in just 140 characters. " Anybody can sign up to follow the pope, whose papal message will be tweeted in English, Spanish, Italian, French, German and soon in Portuguese via @Pope2YouVatican , but this effort was conceived to bring the unfaithful back to the fold.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Squids can fly? If you are a member of the relatively small community of squid aficionados you've known this for a while. But if you are a normal person with just a passing interest in cephalopods and all their many diverse abilities, the fact that these underwater creatures also occasionally get from point A to point B by flying above the water for distances of up to 164 feet at a time might just blow your mind. Ron O'Dor, a marine biologist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, and co-author of a poster called "Squid Rocket Science" presented at the American Geophysical Union's Ocean Sciences Meeting in Salt Lake City, said squids have good reason to fly. It is not to avoid predators, as was previously thought, but rather to save the animal energy as it migrates across vast expanses of ocean, O'Dor said.
SPORTS
May 23, 2011 | By Gary Klein
Bruce Bochy wants balance. Don Mattingly puts a premium on protection. And Mike Scioscia attempts to identify and capitalize on groupings. When it comes to building a batting order, they and other major league managers all desire the same result: peak production throughout the lineup. "It's not rocket science," Scioscia said. However, lineup construction can occasionally be volatile. Early this season, the baseball world was atwitter when Boston Red Sox Manager Terry Francona dropped struggling big-money acquisition Carl Crawford to the No. 7 slot.
SPORTS
February 23, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
It was the last chance in the last game of the last basketball season Ryan Elmquist would ever experience, and the boy wonder wondered. He recorded a perfect score on his ACT exam. He is graduating from Caltech this spring with a computer science degree. He has landed a job as a software engineer at Google. But could he make a free throw? Could he make one unguarded shot to give the Caltech basketball team a victory that would end a 310-game conference losing streak stretched back 26 years?
NATIONAL
July 21, 2010 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
Gerry Matherne recently built a helicopter from "a bit of this and a piece of that," which made him a minor star on YouTube when the engine died in midair and he didn't. He somehow landed the crippled craft beside power lines. "I'm always inventing something," said the gruff 61-year-old captain of an oil supertanker. "When I was a boy, a wristwatch was never safe in my hands. I'd dismantle anything to see how it ran." So when Matherne learned of the runaway BP oil leak, he considered it a personal challenge.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Times Mirror Co., publisher of the Los Angeles Times, has agreed to take a minority stake in Rocket Science Games, a highly regarded Palo Alto-based start-up that aims to be a leader in next-generation video game software. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but sources said Times Mirror will invest about $5 million in Rocket Science, which has already attracted comparable equity investments from Sega of America and Bertelsmann Music Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
WRITER-director Jeffrey Blitz stuttered terribly in high school, surviving the pitfalls of adolescence -- literally -- by his wits. Each time he got stuck on a word, he'd turn the sentence every which way in his head, casting about for a good punch line or a synonym that might harness the thought without the stutter. That struggle gave him a killer vocabulary, a great sense of humor and a lot of pent-up drive that eventually drove Blitz to become the high school debate champ of New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2009 | Blair Tindall
Chemistry textbooks, calculators and instrument cases littered the stage at Caltech's Ramo Auditorium early one warm autumn evening. Squawks and blats from the assembled musicians filled the air, and as Bill Bing raised his baton to start the music, a stray trumpeter rushed onstage. "Sorry I'm late," said Les Deutsch. "If you name an asteroid after me, you can be late," said Bing. It might seem an odd dialogue between musicians, but the Caltech-Occidental Concert Band is filled with uncommon musicians.
FOOD
August 5, 2009
As easy as 1, 2, 3, 4 Your basic American yellow cake is made from flour, sweetened with sugar, given structure with eggs, enriched and tenderized with butter, leavened with baking powder and flavored with vanilla and a little salt. You may have all the ingredients to make a cake on hand right now. The most common recipe is known as 1-2-3-4 cake, because it uses 1 cup each of milk and butter (that's two sticks of butter), 2 cups of sugar, 3 cups of flour and 4 eggs. (Actually, it also needs one-half teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon vanilla and 2 teaspoons of baking powder, so I suppose it's really the 1-2-3-4 plus 1/2 -1-2 cake.)
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