Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRockwell Semiconductor Systems
IN THE NEWS

Rockwell Semiconductor Systems

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems debuted on Monday its new line of imaging sensors that will be built into digital cameras for the consumer market. Developed from the same technology Rockwell used to build elements inside the Hubble Space Telescope, these sensors are computer chips that act as a photo lens inside digital cameras. The company, a unit of Rockwell International Corp.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 11, 1998 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Newport Beach-based semiconductor unit of Rockwell International Corp. will be called when it is spun off at the end of this year, the company said Tuesday. The new company will have a red, stylized "C" logo, and its stock will be traded on the Nasdaq market under the symbol CNXT. The Conexant name, developed by Berkeley-based Master-McNeil Inc., is intended to merge the ideas of "connecting," "next" and the suffix "ant," implying "a proactive action-oriented approach to business."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 22, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Rockwell International Corp., preparing to spin off its semiconductor systems business as an independent company, on Wednesday named the first five people for the new firm's board of directors. Dwight W. Decker, current president of Rockwell Semiconductor Systems, will become chairman of the board and chief executive of the as-yet-unnamed company, which will be based in Newport Beach. Other board members will be Donald R.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following the trend of squeezing more power and function into a smaller package, chip makers are rolling out a new line of imaging technology that will make it cheap enough to put cameras everywhere--from inside your car to inside your body. "We're building cameras on a single chip," said David Escobar, director of digital imaging at Rockwell Semiconductor Systems Inc. in Newport Beach. "It's the Holy Grail of the digital imaging industry, and we're just starting to see the technology emerging."
BUSINESS
February 18, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Only days after a new standard for high-speed modems was established, Rockwell Semiconductor Systems and rival 3Com Corp. said Tuesday they have completed testing to make sure their new product lines will work with each other. The cooperative testing by the two computer chip makers ends more than a year of competition, which caused many potential modem buyers to delay purchases because the technologies were incompatible.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following the trend of squeezing more power and function into a smaller package, chip makers are rolling out a new line of imaging technology that will make it cheap enough to put cameras everywhere--from inside your car to inside your body. "We're building cameras on a single chip," said David Escobar, director of digital imaging at Rockwell Semiconductor Systems Inc. in Newport Beach. "It's the Holy Grail of the digital imaging industry, and we're just starting to see the technology emerging."
BUSINESS
February 16, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A steady, quiet ring of tiny phones can always be heard in the corridors of Rockwell Semiconductor Systems in Newport Beach. After all, hundreds of employees--including some of the system's cleanup crew--carry wireless PBX phones. The devices work through a private telephone switching system. Unlike alternative communication networks that use expensive digital equipment, PBXs use ordinary telephone wire to send information.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1997 | LESLIE HELM
For you online junkies hooked on the World Wide Web but frustrated by the sluggish performance of your modem, there is good news and bad news headed your way. The good news is that next month several dozen companies plan to begin offering modems that transfer data at 56 kilobits per second, twice the rate of the 28.8 modems now widely in use, for prices as low as $89. The bad news is that modem suppliers have split into two camps, with Skokie, Ill.-based U.S.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1998 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Newport Beach-based semiconductor unit of Rockwell International Corp. will be called when it is spun off at the end of this year, the company said Tuesday. The new company will have a red, stylized "C" logo, and its stock will be traded on the Nasdaq market under the symbol CNXT. The Conexant name, developed by Berkeley-based Master-McNeil Inc., is intended to merge the ideas of "connecting," "next" and the suffix "ant," implying "a proactive action-oriented approach to business."
BUSINESS
November 25, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like almost everyone else returning from the Comdex computer trade show last week, a small group of Rockwell employees boarding an Orange County-bound jet were carrying T-shirts and other trinkets they picked up at the show. But the Rockwell group took particular delight in displaying T-shirts they had snatched from the U.S. Robotics booth. It was as if the Rockwell employees had captured an enemy's flag, and in some ways, they had.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Rockwell International Corp., preparing to spin off its semiconductor systems business as an independent company, on Wednesday named the first five people for the new firm's board of directors. Dwight W. Decker, current president of Rockwell Semiconductor Systems, will become chairman of the board and chief executive of the as-yet-unnamed company, which will be based in Newport Beach. Other board members will be Donald R.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rockwell International Corp. Chief Executive Don H. Davis said Friday he expects the company's struggling semiconductor division--which will be spun off into a separate firm in the coming weeks--to return to profitability by the end of next year. The semiconductor market doesn't fit with Rockwell's plans because "it's much more of a volatile industry than we're in," said Davis, 58, speaking in detail for the first time since the company announced its massive restructuring plan in June.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After enjoying five years of double-digit growth, Rockwell Semiconductor Systems Inc.'s sales have dropped 10% in the last nine months and the once-burgeoning company has fallen into the red, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The struggling unit of Rockwell International Corp., which is expected to be spun off by Dec. 31, has plummeted to a net loss of $28 million for the nine months, compared with a profit of $110 million for the same period in 1997.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Only days after a new standard for high-speed modems was established, Rockwell Semiconductor Systems and rival 3Com Corp. said Tuesday they have completed testing to make sure their new product lines will work with each other. The cooperative testing by the two computer chip makers ends more than a year of competition, which caused many potential modem buyers to delay purchases because the technologies were incompatible.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A steady, quiet ring of tiny phones can always be heard in the corridors of Rockwell Semiconductor Systems in Newport Beach. After all, hundreds of employees--including some of the system's cleanup crew--carry wireless PBX phones. The devices work through a private telephone switching system. Unlike alternative communication networks that use expensive digital equipment, PBXs use ordinary telephone wire to send information.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems debuted on Monday its new line of imaging sensors that will be built into digital cameras for the consumer market. Developed from the same technology Rockwell used to build elements inside the Hubble Space Telescope, these sensors are computer chips that act as a photo lens inside digital cameras. The company, a unit of Rockwell International Corp.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After enjoying five years of double-digit growth, Rockwell Semiconductor Systems Inc.'s sales have dropped 10% in the last nine months and the once-burgeoning company has fallen into the red, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The struggling unit of Rockwell International Corp., which is expected to be spun off by Dec. 31, has plummeted to a net loss of $28 million for the nine months, compared with a profit of $110 million for the same period in 1997.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rockwell International Corp. Chief Executive Don H. Davis said Friday he expects the company's struggling semiconductor division--which will be spun off into a separate firm in the coming weeks--to return to profitability by the end of next year. The semiconductor market doesn't fit with Rockwell's plans because "it's much more of a volatile industry than we're in," said Davis, 58, speaking in detail for the first time since the company announced its massive restructuring plan in June.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1997
Seeking a one-stop shopping point for its clients, Rockwell International Corp.'s Semiconductor Systems unit is consolidating its high-speed communications chip business into a new division. The Network Access Division will focus on the company's proprietary 56-kilobits-per-second modem chips and other products in the computer and telecommunications networking arena.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1997 | LESLIE HELM
For you online junkies hooked on the World Wide Web but frustrated by the sluggish performance of your modem, there is good news and bad news headed your way. The good news is that next month several dozen companies plan to begin offering modems that transfer data at 56 kilobits per second, twice the rate of the 28.8 modems now widely in use, for prices as low as $89. The bad news is that modem suppliers have split into two camps, with Skokie, Ill.-based U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|