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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1989
I am writing in regards to articles in The Times (Part I, June 10) concerning events in China and the FBI probe of the Rocky Flats facilities. In both cases governments evidence a callous disregard for the rights and welfare of the citizenry. In response to the repression in China there is widespread outrage and protest. In regards to Rocky Flats nothing comparable has occurred, although thousands of people in the Denver area have been exposed to toxic pollutants illegally released from the plant and, likewise, because officials believe that they know best the priorities for this nation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
The $7-billion cleanup of the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant reached a milestone Tuesday when the last shipment of high-level radioactive waste rumbled off toward a dumpsite in New Mexico. "The nearby communities definitely can feel safer now because this was the last of the heavy stuff," said Ken Korkia, director of the Rocky Flats Citizens Advisory board.
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NATIONAL
April 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
The $7-billion cleanup of the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant reached a milestone Tuesday when the last shipment of high-level radioactive waste rumbled off toward a dumpsite in New Mexico. "The nearby communities definitely can feel safer now because this was the last of the heavy stuff," said Ken Korkia, director of the Rocky Flats Citizens Advisory board.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2005 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
ROCKY FLATS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, Colo. -- These rolling grasslands and foothills would seem a hiker's dream. The valleys are deep, the deer docile and the snowy mountain backdrop dazzling. "The wildlife is really abundant here," said Mark Sattelberg, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist. "It's been pretty much undisturbed for 40 or 50 years." But critics say the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge site has been disturbed plenty.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | Associated Press
Members of a federal grand jury on Wednesday asked President-elect Bill Clinton to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate alleged environmental crimes at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant. Wes McKinley, foreman of a federal grand jury impaneled in 1989 to review allegations of violations by the Energy Department and its contractors at Rocky Flats, made public a letter signed by 12 members asking for Clinton's help.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The volume of radioactive waste generated at the troubled Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Colorado has been cut by half in recent months. It should be reduced by half again next summer, easing a storage crisis building for more than a year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told the nation's governors here Monday.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush's chief of staff urged the governors of seven states today to accept radioactive waste from the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in order to avert a possible shutdown of the plant next year, officials said. The facility near Denver is the nation's only source of plutonium triggers used in nuclear warheads. Colorado Gov. Roy Romer has said that he will not allow the plant to continue operating if alternative sites are not found to store the waste by next March.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | From the Washington Post
Substantial amounts of plutonium were stored in unstable condition or in potentially unsafe containers at the Energy Department's Rocky Flats, Colo., nuclear-weapons plant as recently as Sept. 24, nearly three years after the plant was shut down for environmental and safety problems. An internal memo headed "Ticking Timebombs" disclosed the situation, but the memo's author and scientists from the department's Los Alamos National Laboratory later agreed there was "no imminent hazard."
NEWS
December 9, 1989
Two government agencies that oversee the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant near Denver signed a draft agreement assigning responsibility to begin cleaning up the contaminated complex "almost immediately." The Department of Energy put off signing the document until next week because of a financial snag. The EPA and Colorado Department of Health signed the document, which would be a blueprint for carrying out cleanup priorities agreed on in principle by Gov. Roy Romer and Energy Secretary James D.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department announced Friday that Rockwell International Corp. will bow out as operator of the beleaguered Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant and a new company will take its place. The action marks the final breach between Rockwell and the department, apparently over the growing problem of hazardous waste at the plant and responsibility for the disposal of that waste. Energy Secretary James D.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2005 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
The FBI agent who led the raid on the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in 1989 charged the federal government Wednesday with deceiving the public about cleanup efforts at the facility and said plans for a national wildlife refuge there were irresponsible. "Public recreation at Rocky Flats is a foolish idea driven by politics, not by facts," said Jon Lipsky, who took early retirement from the FBI to speak out against the refuge. "It's dangerous and scientists say they can't make it safe."
BUSINESS
April 5, 1995 | From Associated Press
Kaiser-Hill Co. received a five-year, $3.5-billion contract Tuesday to manage the cleanup of plutonium and other dangerous wastes at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Colorado. Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary said the company promised to shave $1.2 billion off previously anticipated cleanup costs. Kaiser-Hill is a joint venture subsidiary of ICF Kaiser and CH2M Hill Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995 | WARD MARCHANT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anson Burlingame has taken to wearing a bright yellow button to remind everyone what the problem is at Rocky Flats. "It's the plutonium, stupid," it reads. Not that there was any doubt. Rocky Flats--the nuclear bomb facility 16 miles northwest of Denver--remains the home of 14.2 tons of plutonium. It is Burlingame's job to make Rocky Flats safe. And this, he said, is "the toughest job in the United States today.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fluor Ends Talks to Acquire Cleanup Project: In a setback to its efforts to expand its nuclear decontamination business, Fluor Daniel Inc. said it will not take over the remaining 15 months of a federal contract to manage the defunct Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant near Denver. The major operating unit of Fluor Corp. in Irvine could not reach a final agreement with EG&G Inc. in Wellesley, Mass., to take over its EG&G Rocky Flats Inc.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1994 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to expand in the fast-growing nuclear decontamination business, Fluor Daniel Inc. said Friday it has signed an agreement to take over the remaining 15 months of a federal contract to manage the defunct Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant near Denver. Fluor Daniel, a subsidiary of Irvine-based Fluor Corp., the giant construction and engineering company, said its letter of intent is to acquire the contract from EG&G Inc., a Wellesley, Mass.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | From The Washington Post
The Justice Department on Thursday issued a rebuttal to congressional criticism of its handling of the 1989 investigation of environmental and safety problems at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons complex. The operator of the Colorado plant, Rockwell International Corp., paid an $18.5-million fine, the largest hazardous waste fine in history, in 1992 after pleading guilty to 10 hazardous waste and clean water violations.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Thursday he'll ask seven states to store radioactive waste from a Colorado nuclear weapons plant threatened with shutdown unless waste sites are found by March. Watkins said he had not yet selected the states, but they apparently would include Colorado and Idaho and possibly New Mexico, Nevada and Washington, which are key links in the Energy Department's troubled nuclear weapons complex.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Energy Department announced that it has suspended handling of all plutonium at its Rocky Flats, Colo., nuclear weapons plant because of security breakdowns. Rocky Flats, which produces plutonium triggers for nuclear weapons, has had its manufacturing operations suspended since December because of safety and environmental problems. The latest order applies to all handling and movement of nuclear materials, the department said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The notion that the U.S. government suspended democracy in the name of combatting anti-democratic communist forces during the Cold War is more than an idea. It has a face, and its name is Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant. There's little important information in Al Austin's "Frontline" report, "Secrets of a Bomb Factory" that didn't appear in Barry Siegel's two-part August story in the Los Angeles Times Magazine. (The show airs at 9 tonight on KCET-TV Channel 28 and KPBS-TV Channel 15, 8 p.m.
MAGAZINE
September 5, 1993
I read "Showdown at Rocky Flats" (by Barry Siegel, Aug. 8 and 15) with much abhorrence. It is disgusting when the government creates laws and then holds itself above them. What makes Rocky Flats infuriating, however, is that Rockwell senior managers have been able to hide behind that same veil of arrogance and claim absolution from their crimes. Are the citizens of this country to remain victims of the tyranny of such high-powered commerce? Though I may feel powerless to challenge such corruption myself, someone must.
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