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Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant

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NEWS
May 18, 1991 | Associated Press
Fire in a non-nuclear area of a building at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant forced about 50 workers to evacuate, plant officials said. No injuries were reported and no contamination was detected in the incident Thursday, a spokeswoman said.
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NATIONAL
October 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The contractor hired to clean up the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant declared the $7-billion, 10-year project completed, a major milestone in the conversion of the site to a wildlife refuge. Kaiser-Hill Co. said it was proud of the effort to "complete the largest, most complex environmental cleanup project in United States history."
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NEWS
August 2, 1989
A special grand jury was impaneled to hear numerous allegations of safety violations at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Colorado, including the illegal dumping of hazardous wastes. Chief U.S. District Judge Sherman G. Finesilver told the 23 grand jurors their only task during the 18-month term would be "to determine what criminal acts, if any, were committed at Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant."
NATIONAL
January 6, 2005 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
The FBI agent who led the raid on the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in 1989 charged the federal government Wednesday with deceiving the public about cleanup efforts at the facility and said plans for a national wildlife refuge there were irresponsible. "Public recreation at Rocky Flats is a foolish idea driven by politics, not by facts," said Jon Lipsky, who took early retirement from the FBI to speak out against the refuge. "It's dangerous and scientists say they can't make it safe."
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two workers at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Denver filed a lawsuit against their former employers and co-workers, saying they were sexually harassed and deliberately contaminated with radiation after reporting safety problems to the FBI. The suit was filed in Boulder District Court by Jacqueline Brever and Karen Pitts, who worked at Rocky Flats for seven years until they were forced to quit last April.
NEWS
December 9, 1989
Two government agencies that oversee the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant near Denver signed a draft agreement assigning responsibility to begin cleaning up the contaminated complex "almost immediately." The Department of Energy put off signing the document until next week because of a financial snag. The EPA and Colorado Department of Health signed the document, which would be a blueprint for carrying out cleanup priorities agreed on in principle by Gov. Roy Romer and Energy Secretary James D.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The contractor hired to clean up the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant declared the $7-billion, 10-year project completed, a major milestone in the conversion of the site to a wildlife refuge. Kaiser-Hill Co. said it was proud of the effort to "complete the largest, most complex environmental cleanup project in United States history."
NEWS
September 19, 1989
Federal energy and environmental officials announced an agreement for handling wastes from the federal Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant near Denver, an issue that had threatened to close the plant. The problem arose because of concern by officials from the Department of Energy and Rockwell International Corp., which runs the plant for the department, about their personal liability for the plant's failure to follow environmental laws by storing the mixed wastes at the plant.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kaiser-Hill Gets $3.5-Billion Contract: The Energy Department said it awarded the work to the venture of ICF Kaiser International Inc. for the cleanup of the Rocky Flats site in Colorado. The area is the site of a former nuclear weapons production facility. The government said in a statement that the contract is expected to save U.S. taxpayers $1.2 billion over five years.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1995 | From Associated Press
Kaiser-Hill Co. received a five-year, $3.5-billion contract Tuesday to manage the cleanup of plutonium and other dangerous wastes at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Colorado. Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary said the company promised to shave $1.2 billion off previously anticipated cleanup costs. Kaiser-Hill is a joint venture subsidiary of ICF Kaiser and CH2M Hill Co.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of testes and ovaries from people who lived near the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Colorado have been in freezers for about 15 years, part of a plutonium-testing study that ran out of money, the Albuquerque Tribune reported. The body parts, obtained from autopsies with relatives' permission, are from a 1975 study to determine whether the people had more plutonium in their bodies than people living elsewhere. The body parts sat in freezers at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The notion that the U.S. government suspended democracy in the name of combatting anti-democratic communist forces during the Cold War is more than an idea. It has a face, and its name is Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant. There's little important information in Al Austin's "Frontline" report, "Secrets of a Bomb Factory" that didn't appear in Barry Siegel's two-part August story in the Los Angeles Times Magazine. (The show airs at 9 tonight on KCET-TV Channel 28 and KPBS-TV Channel 15, 8 p.m.
MAGAZINE
August 15, 1993 | BARRY SIEGEL, Barry Siegel, a Times national correspondent, is the author of "A Death in White Bear Lake" and "Shades of Gray," both published by Bantam Books. His last story for this magazine was about the University of Wisconsin's efforts to outlaw hate speech.
FOR THE 23 COLORADO CITIZENS SUMMONED TO SERVE AS GRAND jurors in the investigation of the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant, the two years of weeklong sessions each month between mid-1989 and mid-1991 did not provide an entirely tranquil or enjoyable experience. There were sacrifices, traveling so regularly to Denver from distant reaches of the state. Shirley Kyle's extended absences from the tiny east Colorado town of Farley forced her to close her hairdressing salon.
MAGAZINE
August 8, 1993 | BARRY SIEGEL, Barry Seigel, a Times national correspondent, is the author of "Death in White Bear Lake" and "Shades of Gray," both published by Bantam Books. His last story for this magazine was about the University of Wisconsin's effort to outlaw hate speech
WHEN FBI AGENT JON LIPSKY PROPOSED IN JUNE, 1988, THAT they "do Rocky Flats," Assistant U.S. Atty. Ken Fimberg gave him the type of look you'd direct at someone who'd just said something intriguing but utterly wacky. Lipsky was neither surprised nor offended, for he more or less shared this response. They were sitting in Fimberg's office in the federal courthouse building in downtown Denver. With them was William Smith, an Environmental Protection Agency investigator.
NEWS
January 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
A judge on Tuesday released an edited version of a sealed special grand jury report that accused the government and a contractor of covering up environmental law violations at the Rocky Flats weapons plant. The report was shelved last March by federal prosecutors, who instead reached an $18.5-million plea bargain with former Rocky Flats operator Rockwell International Corp. But angry grand jurors leaked portions of their report to the news media. On Tuesday, Denver U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A House subcommittee Monday blasted the U.S. Justice Department for "extreme conservatism and lack of aggressiveness" in curbing a federal grand jury report on environmental crimes at the government's Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant. A three-year investigation, launched with a 1989 FBI raid on the plant, ended last June with Rockwell International Corp. pleading guilty to a total of 10 criminal counts--five felonies and five misdemeanors--and agreeing to a record $18.5-million fine.
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