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Rocky Mountain Arsenal

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NEWS
January 26, 1986
Reversing earlier statements, the Army admitted it found a poisonous chemical at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal five months before reports disclosed the chemical had polluted nearby drinking wells. Army officials had claimed the toxic solvent TCE was discovered only after the Denver Post reported in July that the chemical had contaminated wells supplying 30,000 people. The Army now says it had the first test results from well samples last February.
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NATIONAL
April 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Part of the former Rocky Mountain Arsenal, once among the most contaminated places in the nation, opens this weekend as a national wildlife refuge. Rolling prairie where defense workers for four decades produced deadly sarin, mustard gas and napalm is now home to more than 300 species, from white pelicans to foxes to bald eagles. Interior Secretary Gale A.
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NEWS
December 13, 1988
A San Mateo County Superior Court jury has begun deliberations in Shell Oil Co.'s suit to force its insurance companies to pay claims for toxic waste damage at a Colorado Army installation. The 12-member jury must decide whether Shell or more than 200 insurers are liable for the oil giant's share of cleanup costs estimated to run into billions of dollars at Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In a massive lawsuit among major corporations, a jury ruled Monday that Shell Oil Co., and not its 250 insurance companies, must pay upward of $1 billion for the toxic waste cleanup at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal north of Denver. The verdict, reached on an 11-1 vote after five days of deliberation, is certain to be applied in toxic pollution cases throughout the country. "The result has far-reaching ramifications for the entire country," said William Trautman, attorney for Shell.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In a massive lawsuit among major corporations, a jury ruled Monday that Shell Oil Co., and not its 250 insurance companies, must pay upward of $1 billion for the toxic waste cleanup at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal north of Denver. The verdict, reached on an 11-1 vote after five days of deliberation, is certain to be applied in toxic pollution cases throughout the country. "The result has far-reaching ramifications for the entire country," said William Trautman, attorney for Shell.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Part of the former Rocky Mountain Arsenal, once among the most contaminated places in the nation, opens this weekend as a national wildlife refuge. Rolling prairie where defense workers for four decades produced deadly sarin, mustard gas and napalm is now home to more than 300 species, from white pelicans to foxes to bald eagles. Interior Secretary Gale A.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
After an absence of more than a century, wild bison were returned to Colorado's Front Range. Sixteen buffalo from the National Bison Range in northwestern Montana were released into an enclosed 1,400-acre section of a wildlife refuge that formerly was the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, where nerve gas and other chemical weapons were manufactured. The refuge, which is about 10 miles from downtown Denver, already is home to deer, bald eagles and hundreds of other species.
NEWS
June 30, 1986 | United Press International
A Continental Airlines jet taking off for Salt Lake City early today hit a deer on the runway but completed its takeoff and made an emergency landing, authorities said. An airport spokesman said the deer, which was killed, apparently jumped the security fence separating the airport from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal property. Continental Flight 403--an MD-80 with about 70 people on board--landed safely with emergency vehicles standing by.
NEWS
January 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Using a steel chamber, Army workers detonated a Cold War-era bomblet in Commerce City and began neutralizing the deadly sarin nerve gas it contained. In coming weeks, the Army will detonate five more grapefruit-size sarin bomblets found during efforts to convert the former Rocky Mountain Arsenal to a wildlife refuge. The Army had planned to detonate the bombs outdoors, but neighbors complained, and the state raised concerns as well.
NEWS
December 13, 1988
A San Mateo County Superior Court jury has begun deliberations in Shell Oil Co.'s suit to force its insurance companies to pay claims for toxic waste damage at a Colorado Army installation. The 12-member jury must decide whether Shell or more than 200 insurers are liable for the oil giant's share of cleanup costs estimated to run into billions of dollars at Rocky Mountain Arsenal near Denver.
NEWS
January 26, 1986
Reversing earlier statements, the Army admitted it found a poisonous chemical at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal five months before reports disclosed the chemical had polluted nearby drinking wells. Army officials had claimed the toxic solvent TCE was discovered only after the Denver Post reported in July that the chemical had contaminated wells supplying 30,000 people. The Army now says it had the first test results from well samples last February.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The discovery of a toxic material called "the dew of death" at Rocky Mountain Arsenal Wildlife Refuge has forced closure of the refuge and the cancellation of four wildlife, nature and photo programs this weekend. Sherry James, a park ranger, told the Rocky Mountain News that about 150 people had been expected to take part.
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