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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2001
Re "Short-Circuiting Traffic Shortcuts," July 24: As the owner of a 1956 Packard, I have a problem with speed bumps, humps and tables. Simply put, I should not have to put my car at risk to drive on a public road. No matter how carefully and slowly you drive over them, a car with a long wheelbase or low ground clearance can rebound and bottom or scrape. Hit one at the wrong speed or angle and you may just knock out your car's wheel alignment and damage its suspension. The larger issue is liability.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 24, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
TAGHAR, Afghanistan - In a rugged valley outside Kabul, where mud-walled villages blend into bare scrubland, a team of international mining experts and Afghan trainees set up camp over the winter to probe the region's mineral resources. Protected by armed guards, they spent three months drilling test holes into the snowcapped peaks, as curious goat- and sheepherders looked on. "We hit copper damn near everywhere," said Robert Miller, a Colorado-based mining executive recruited by the Pentagon to help advise Afghan authorities on how to develop the country's natural resources.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Lynell George
There are those who return to Jack Kerouac just to get lost in the ride. Not across lonesome America but in the serpentine locomotion of his prose. It's the music of the page: long blasts of blue-streak narrative that don't yield to periods, semicolons, commas; mile-long sentences that twist onto side-road tangents before -- in their best moments -- leading to a clear, untrammeled epiphany. Kerouac's ear was tuned to a different set of rules: that herky-jerk flow, the misplaced modifier mining something different, something else.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The sweet but not too syrupy romance of "The Lucky One,"starring a buffed Zac Efron and a blond Taylor Schilling, is about love emerging from the war-ravaged rubble of a young soldier's heart and the unlikely things that save him. Directed by Scott Hicks ("Shine"), with Will Fetters adapting the Nicholas Sparks novel, this is the latest and the best Sparks-inspired film to come along since "The Notebook" won over hearts, if not minds, in 2004. The Sparks-styled romance has almost become its own movie genre - predictable, pure of heart, sentimental and never straying from the boy-meets-girl basics, or the surface, for that matter - and in that "The Lucky One" delivers.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2009 | Cyndia Zwahlen
After he was laid off last fall from his job driving a delivery truck, Ricardo Lara couldn't find another full-time position that would pay the bills. So he went into business for himself driving an ice cream truck. At first, he was making as much money peddling Heath bars, Bomb Pops and ice cream sandwiches as he did at his old job. But that didn't last. As the economy melted down, so did sales, despite his seven-day workweek plying the streets of South Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1999 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after Bob Gonzales was named police chief, his own officers posted this sign along one of the city's busiest streets: "Now Entering a High Crime Area." The sign was prompted by a labor dispute between officers and city officials--one of the many challenges facing the city's new police chief. Last year violent crime jumped 38% in the city. The department, meanwhile, has had the same number of sworn officers--29--since 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The sweet but not too syrupy romance of "The Lucky One,"starring a buffed Zac Efron and a blond Taylor Schilling, is about love emerging from the war-ravaged rubble of a young soldier's heart and the unlikely things that save him. Directed by Scott Hicks ("Shine"), with Will Fetters adapting the Nicholas Sparks novel, this is the latest and the best Sparks-inspired film to come along since "The Notebook" won over hearts, if not minds, in 2004. The Sparks-styled romance has almost become its own movie genre - predictable, pure of heart, sentimental and never straying from the boy-meets-girl basics, or the surface, for that matter - and in that "The Lucky One" delivers.
SPORTS
June 17, 1993 | DANNY ROBBINS
As one who endured the 1962 season with the New York Mets, who had the worst record in baseball's modern era, Philadelphia broadcaster Rich Ashburn knows futility when he sees it, and apparently he has seen it this season in the Colorado Rockies. After the Phillies had beaten the Rockies, 18-1, wrote Bob Kravitz of the Rocky Mountain News, Ashburn was heard to say, "Geez, we were never this bad."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1995
The Joltmeter won't find its way into the annals of important American inventions. It simply didn't last long enough. It was first pressed into service awhile back on the streets of New York City as a means of finding the worst potholes. It lasted about three blocks before it was irreparably jarred into mechanical road kill by holes that might have challenged the lunar land rover. Well, these days it must seem as though the Big Apple has nothing on L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With $800 in his pocket, 23-year-old Chad Forestelle announced to his parents little more than a year ago that he intended to start his own taxi company in the Oxnard-Port Hueneme area. True, he had experience as a cabbie, but he was a high school dropout, and the venerable Yellow Cab company operating in that area has seen competitors come and go. "I thought he was crazy," said his mother, Judi Forestelle of Oxnard. "We told him, 'You can't do that.' He said, 'Watch me.' The kid's got guts."
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Is silence truly golden? Can George Clooney's tears bring Oscar happiness? Will Billy Crystal's yuks play as well as they did eight years ago? And could the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for the first time bestow acting statuettes on two African American women on the same night? It's been a bit of a rocky road to Sunday night's 84th Academy Awards: Original ceremony producer Brett Ratner resigned amid a cloud of controversy, Eddie Murphy bowed out of the hosting job and was replaced by Crystal, the Kodak Theatre became the no-name theater after the film company filed for bankruptcy and Sacha Baron Cohen has threatened some red carpet shenanigans.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard and David Pierson
Winston Chung came to Southern California two years ago like a standard-bearer for the new China, a wealthy Hong Kong entrepreneur with visions of creating an electric vehicle industry by reviving struggling manufacturing firms. Some dreams rolled out as planned. The battery scientist and clean-energy promoter bought control of four Southland specialty vehicle makers. UC Riverside renamed a building as Winston Chung Hall, saying that the $13 million he provided for green power research was the biggest donation in campus history.
SPORTS
May 23, 2010
Tuesday through Thursday: Cubs at Chicago Friday through Sunday: Rockies at Denver The Dodgers don't have a proven ace, but the Chicago Cubs do, and that's a problem for both teams. As the Dodgers push Clayton Kershaw to the front of a thin rotation — in a year in which he might have been a college senior — the Cubs are about to put Carlos Zambrano back in their rotation. In 2007, with Zambrano on his way to finishing fifth in the Cy Young Award voting for the third time in four years, the Cubs signed him to a $92-million extension.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Lynell George
There are those who return to Jack Kerouac just to get lost in the ride. Not across lonesome America but in the serpentine locomotion of his prose. It's the music of the page: long blasts of blue-streak narrative that don't yield to periods, semicolons, commas; mile-long sentences that twist onto side-road tangents before -- in their best moments -- leading to a clear, untrammeled epiphany. Kerouac's ear was tuned to a different set of rules: that herky-jerk flow, the misplaced modifier mining something different, something else.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2009 | Cyndia Zwahlen
After he was laid off last fall from his job driving a delivery truck, Ricardo Lara couldn't find another full-time position that would pay the bills. So he went into business for himself driving an ice cream truck. At first, he was making as much money peddling Heath bars, Bomb Pops and ice cream sandwiches as he did at his old job. But that didn't last. As the economy melted down, so did sales, despite his seven-day workweek plying the streets of South Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
"Blueprint America: Road to the Future," airing tonight on PBS, is a half-inspirational, half-frustrating report that addresses the question of infrastructure through the prism of transportation in three American cities. It's a dull word, "infrastructure," but one that becomes suddenly sharper if you apply it, say, to that traffic you're sitting in. We don't just live on the land; we live on the things that separate us from the land, and move us across it.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So you finally have a band, but you can't get a gig. You are tired of playing the garage and the neighbors are relieved. And you can't find anyone who will pay you to play. Now what? A day job? Well, there's always Plan B: Buy your own bar. The Young Dubliners, or more precisely front man Keith Roberts, bought Fair City, an Irish pub in Santa Monica. That's one way to get gigs--and free beer, too. Locals can save themselves a drive when the band plays in Ventura on Friday night.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2009 | Hugo Martin
Not the ocotillo. Anything but the ocotillo. As I flew over the handlebars of my mountain bike on a rocky trail outside El Paso, I knew my landing would be hard. I just prayed I would not land on those nasty ocotillo plants that bordered the bike trail like roadside land mines. Even a prickly pear cactus or an agave plant would be a better landing alternative to the ocotillo, whose quills extend like hypodermic needles. But I lucked out.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2009 | James Oliphant
Marking the end of a bizarre political odyssey, Roland Burris was sworn in as the junior senator from Illinois on Thursday, taking his place among a body that not long ago vowed to bar him from its ranks. Burris took the oath of office in the Senate chamber, a little more than week after Democrats rejected him because he was appointed by embattled Democratic Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich of Illinois to fill the seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama.
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