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Rod Laver

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October 10, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
The man who won all four Grand Slam tennis events in a single year -- twice -- Rod Laver, says there is no argument in his mind who is the greatest player of this generation: Roger Federer. “When I look at Federer, with what he's accomplished, against the competition that he's accomplished it with, I'd have to say I would think that Roger is the greatest player,” Laver said while attending the Shanghai Masters on Thursday in China. And while Rafael Nadal has a 21-10 career advantage over Federer, Laver doesn't think he has the complete body of work that Federer has accumulated.
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SPORTS
October 10, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
The man who won all four Grand Slam tennis events in a single year -- twice -- Rod Laver, says there is no argument in his mind who is the greatest player of this generation: Roger Federer. “When I look at Federer, with what he's accomplished, against the competition that he's accomplished it with, I'd have to say I would think that Roger is the greatest player,” Laver said while attending the Shanghai Masters on Thursday in China. And while Rafael Nadal has a 21-10 career advantage over Federer, Laver doesn't think he has the complete body of work that Federer has accumulated.
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SPORTS
March 26, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
The biggest grand slam of Rod Laver's life had nothing to do with major tennis tournaments. He met Mary Shelby Peterson at the Jack Kramer Tennis Club. Then, in 1966, at a church in San Rafael, he changed that to Mary Shelby Laver. Game, set, match. They left the marriage ceremony by walking under an arch of tennis rackets formed by, among others, tennis greats Lew Hoad, Ken Rosewall, Mal Anderson and Barry MacKay. When Mary died Nov. 12 at their home in Carlsbad, they had had 46 years of marriage and Laver had a hole in his heart the size of a tennis ball.
SPORTS
March 26, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
The biggest grand slam of Rod Laver's life had nothing to do with major tennis tournaments. He met Mary Shelby Peterson at the Jack Kramer Tennis Club. Then, in 1966, at a church in San Rafael, he changed that to Mary Shelby Laver. Game, set, match. They left the marriage ceremony by walking under an arch of tennis rackets formed by, among others, tennis greats Lew Hoad, Ken Rosewall, Mal Anderson and Barry MacKay. When Mary died Nov. 12 at their home in Carlsbad, they had had 46 years of marriage and Laver had a hole in his heart the size of a tennis ball.
SPORTS
May 22, 1994 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dark clouds threatened more rain as Australians Rod Laver and Tony Roche played for the U.S. Open championship on a grass court left soggy by morning showers. The start of the match had been delayed 95 minutes while a helicopter helped dry the court. It was Sept. 8, 1969. Laver, 31, was seven years older than Roche and had lost five of seven matches to him that year.
SPORTS
August 25, 1997 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
Pete Sampras never went to college, but he has studied hard. His favorite subject, and motivator, is the history of tennis, a game at which he excels. And, as Patton had Napoleon and Nicklaus had Hogan, Sampras has his own pedestal figure to learn from. As Sampras, top-seeded and top-ranked, begins his quest for yet another major title at the two-week U.S. Open starting today in New York, there will be extra reasons to introduce the name of Rodney George Laver into the proceedings.
SPORTS
January 29, 2007
'The best way to beat him would be to hit him over the head with a racket.' Rod Laver, the only player to have twice won tennis' Grand Slam, on Australian Open champion Roger Federer.
SPORTS
August 4, 1998 | LISA DILLMAN
Tennis legend Rod Laver has been moved back to the intensive care unit at UCLA Medical Center because of a fever, and doctors are trying to determine its cause. A hospital spokeswoman said Monday that the fever has caused a "temporary neurological condition," a weakening of the right arm and leg. Laver was said to be responding to treatment but remains in serious condition. He suffered a moderate stroke a week ago. Before the setback, Laver had been progressing.
SPORTS
September 3, 1994
Pancho Gonzalez and Rod Laver dominated tennis in their day. Now, when Pete Sampras serves 130-m.p.h. aces clipping alternate sidelines, journalists grumble there are no jokes in the press conference. Must we call in Billy Crystal? (Mike Downey, Aug. 31). Along with boxing, tennis is one of the few sports that's a single person-to-person confrontation. The degree of mental focus and physical capacity needed to win is awesome. For our time, Sampras has this; he will surely go down as one of the all-time greats.
SPORTS
January 15, 2011 | By Michelle Kaufman
The most pressing issue Down Under heading into the Australian Open is when it might stop raining. Deadly floods have drenched large regions of Australia since November, and the wet weather continued to wreak havoc with a few tune-up tournaments last week. But the biggest on-court question as the tennis world converges on Melbourne is whether Rafael Nadal will win a fourth consecutive major title. Last season, he won the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. If he wins the Australian Open, he will be the first man to win four majors in a row since another left-hander, Rod Laver, did it in 1969.
WORLD
February 22, 2009 | Julie Cart
Bells tolled today across Australia as the nation paused to remember the 209 people killed during a firestorm that raged across the state of Victoria two weeks ago. Thousands gathered on a late summer day for a nationally televised memorial service. Church bells pealed along the Yarra River, and in the Rod Laver Arena, attendees shook tiny hand bells.
SPORTS
February 6, 2007 | Bill Dwyre
Rod Laver is an elder statesman of tennis now. He is 68, lives in Carlsbad, has recovered almost fully from a stroke in 1998 and still plays enough tennis and golf to make sure somebody else buys the drinks afterward. He has had hip and knee replacements, a problem only at airport metal detectors. "I'm a bionic man," he says. "Sometimes, I've got seven guys patting me down." He is revered in the world of sports, not just his specialty. And he takes it all in stride, as he always has.
SPORTS
January 29, 2007
'The best way to beat him would be to hit him over the head with a racket.' Rod Laver, the only player to have twice won tennis' Grand Slam, on Australian Open champion Roger Federer.
SPORTS
July 20, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unusual outcome had the winner shaking his head. Rod Laver was certainly capable of a one-sided victory. He'd won the Grand Slam--all four majors in the same calendar year--in 1962 and came to the Pacific Southwest Open tournament in 1968 as the reigning Wimbledon champion. But winning the final two sets, 6-0, 6-0, in the tournament final was extraordinary.
SPORTS
July 15, 1999 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sense, Australian tennis legend Rod Laver will have come full circle when he is celebrated as the tournament honoree July 26 by the Mercedes-Benz Cup event at UCLA and the ATP Tour recognizes the 30th anniversary of his second Grand Slam. It was during a special event on the first night of the tournament last July 27 when news filtered through the grounds that Laver had suffered a moderate stroke earlier in the day.
SPORTS
July 28, 1998 | LISA DILLMAN and LARRY STEWART
Tennis Hall of Famer Rod Laver, 59, suffered a stroke Monday shortly after taping a television interview in Los Angeles and was taken to UCLA Medical Center. A nursing supervisor said late Monday night that Laver had undergone diagnostic procedures, that his family was with him and he was resting comfortably. The supervisor said the family requested that no other information be released.
SPORTS
August 28, 1998 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Australian tennis legend Rod Laver, who suffered a moderate stroke July 27, was released from UCLA Medical Center on Thursday. Laver, wearing a UCLA tennis cap, tossed a tennis ball with his right hand from his wheelchair to one of his doctors, Eric Aldrich. Aldrich also threw a tennis ball to Laver, who caught it with his right hand.
SPORTS
January 31, 1999 | Diane Pucin
Rod Laver is standing in front of the car with the "Auzze" license plates and is surrounded by 34 pounds of cats, two of them, fuzzy and fat and looking for a way to sneak from the entryway into the forbidden inner reaches of the house. But Laver is too quick. He steps smoothly in front of the door and allows human guests inside while keeping the kitties outside, looking in.
SPORTS
September 6, 1998 | BUD COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're looking for tapes of redheaded Rodney "Rocket" Laver in his racket-flapping prime, swooping to conquer like an avenging firebird, there's no shortage. Pete Sampras used to watch them as a kid and found inspiration. Laver is still flying on the neural tape decks of all of us who savored his triumphant U.S. championship performances at Forest Hills in 1962 and 1969.
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