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Rod Lurie

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2000 | SAUL RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whether people would stick around after a recent USC screening for a discussion of his political thriller "Deterrence" was a matter of concern for writer-director Rod Lurie. After all, it was a Friday night, when a college crowd might have something less serious in mind. To Lurie's delight the student audience did stay for a lively and thoughtful debate about the film's disturbing conclusion and its ultimate message about the use of nuclear weapons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
In one of her most famous reviews, Pauline Kael described Sam Peckinpah's "Straw Dogs" as "the first American film that is a fascist work of art. " Released in 1971, the movie follows an American mathematician, David Sumner (Dustin Hoffman), and his wife, Amy (Susan George), who become the subject of an escalating series of attacks by a gang of locals; its graphic depiction of rape and murder crystallized the filmmaker's worldview that humans are instinctively attuned to violence. No one is more aware of the film's complicated legacy than Rod Lurie.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2000
I still remember fuming when I read critic-turned-screenwriter Rod Lurie's xenophobic review of "Mississippi Masala" in Los Angeles magazine a few years back. The story in Calendar ("Once a Critic, Now a Player," by Robert W. Welkos, Oct. 8) confirmed my views that the guy is also racist, homophobic, mean-spirited and a real opportunist. Hey, but he's a real man's man, and he sure has fun when he plays cards with his buddies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
The first thing writer-director Rod Lurie wants you to know about his new film "Nothing but the Truth" is that it wasn't inspired by Judith Miller. In fact, he's tired of denying that it has to do with the former New York Times reporter based in Washington, D.C., who was jailed for contempt of court in July 2005 for refusing to testify before a federal grand jury investigating a leak naming Valerie Plame as a covert CIA agent. (Miller hadn't written an article revealing Plame but was supposedly in possession of relevant information regarding the leak.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1990
In Kari Granville's Sept. 29 article about the clash between TV's "60 Minutes" and the National Enquirer ("A Tangle for Inquiring Minds"), the author made a number of references to documents alleged (by the Enquirer) to have been stolen and turned over to the CBS News program. During my interview with Granville, I repeatedly discussed the Enquirer's allegations, myself having been singled out by the Enquirer for being in possession of the same "stolen" material (which I used during my investigation of the National Enquirer for the October issue of Los Angeles magazine)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2005 | Susan King
DONALD Sutherland is intimidating. Perhaps it is his stature -- he's 6 feet 4 -- or the shock of white hair or the piercing blue eyes. Maybe it's that voice, filled with gravitas. "What are we talking about?" he asks in a businesslike manner at the outset of a recent interview. A little bit of everything. Sutherland, a fit, handsome 70, is everywhere these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
An unlikely combination of "West Wing" and the National Enquirer, "The Contender" is the type of trashy but watchable political melodrama we don't get much of anymore. Ripped from today's headlines with a veneer of social consciousness thrown in free of charge, it's bombastic, pulpy and way contrived. But it does move right along and it's enlivened by stronger, more enjoyable acting than this kind of picture usually provides.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Just because all inmates of the military prison known as the Castle are disgraced former soldiers, don't believe they don't still have the stuff of heroes in them. Just because these men have committed the worst kinds of crimes, don't think they can't be as self-sacrificing as the Little Sisters of the Poor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008 | Susan King, King is a Times staff writer.
The first thing writer-director Rod Lurie wants you to know about his new film "Nothing but the Truth" is that it wasn't inspired by Judith Miller. In fact, he's tired of denying that it has to do with the former New York Times reporter based in Washington, D.C., who was jailed for contempt of court in July 2005 for refusing to testify before a federal grand jury investigating a leak naming Valerie Plame as a covert CIA agent. (Miller hadn't written an article revealing Plame but was supposedly in possession of relevant information regarding the leak.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, Robert W. Welkos is a Times staff writer
The night tumbles down on the quiet Westside residential street of Spanish-style bungalows and trim lawns as the ragtag gamblers trickle in and take their seats behind the Poker Table--not just any table, mind you, but the same used in the 1992 comedy "Honeymoon in Vegas." The gamblers--all of whom work in the entertainment business--go by various monikers: Ahkman (a derivation of Aw C'mon). Dog. The Admiral. Heinz. Antoine. The Weather Boy. The Sheriff. And Rouge.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2005 | Susan King
DONALD Sutherland is intimidating. Perhaps it is his stature -- he's 6 feet 4 -- or the shock of white hair or the piercing blue eyes. Maybe it's that voice, filled with gravitas. "What are we talking about?" he asks in a businesslike manner at the outset of a recent interview. A little bit of everything. Sutherland, a fit, handsome 70, is everywhere these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Just because all inmates of the military prison known as the Castle are disgraced former soldiers, don't believe they don't still have the stuff of heroes in them. Just because these men have committed the worst kinds of crimes, don't think they can't be as self-sacrificing as the Little Sisters of the Poor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2000
I still remember fuming when I read critic-turned-screenwriter Rod Lurie's xenophobic review of "Mississippi Masala" in Los Angeles magazine a few years back. The story in Calendar ("Once a Critic, Now a Player," by Robert W. Welkos, Oct. 8) confirmed my views that the guy is also racist, homophobic, mean-spirited and a real opportunist. Hey, but he's a real man's man, and he sure has fun when he plays cards with his buddies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
An unlikely combination of "West Wing" and the National Enquirer, "The Contender" is the type of trashy but watchable political melodrama we don't get much of anymore. Ripped from today's headlines with a veneer of social consciousness thrown in free of charge, it's bombastic, pulpy and way contrived. But it does move right along and it's enlivened by stronger, more enjoyable acting than this kind of picture usually provides.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, Robert W. Welkos is a Times staff writer
The night tumbles down on the quiet Westside residential street of Spanish-style bungalows and trim lawns as the ragtag gamblers trickle in and take their seats behind the Poker Table--not just any table, mind you, but the same used in the 1992 comedy "Honeymoon in Vegas." The gamblers--all of whom work in the entertainment business--go by various monikers: Ahkman (a derivation of Aw C'mon). Dog. The Admiral. Heinz. Antoine. The Weather Boy. The Sheriff. And Rouge.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2000 | SAUL RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whether people would stick around after a recent USC screening for a discussion of his political thriller "Deterrence" was a matter of concern for writer-director Rod Lurie. After all, it was a Friday night, when a college crowd might have something less serious in mind. To Lurie's delight the student audience did stay for a lively and thoughtful debate about the film's disturbing conclusion and its ultimate message about the use of nuclear weapons.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
In one of her most famous reviews, Pauline Kael described Sam Peckinpah's "Straw Dogs" as "the first American film that is a fascist work of art. " Released in 1971, the movie follows an American mathematician, David Sumner (Dustin Hoffman), and his wife, Amy (Susan George), who become the subject of an escalating series of attacks by a gang of locals; its graphic depiction of rape and murder crystallized the filmmaker's worldview that humans are instinctively attuned to violence. No one is more aware of the film's complicated legacy than Rod Lurie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1990
In Kari Granville's Sept. 29 article about the clash between TV's "60 Minutes" and the National Enquirer ("A Tangle for Inquiring Minds"), the author made a number of references to documents alleged (by the Enquirer) to have been stolen and turned over to the CBS News program. During my interview with Granville, I repeatedly discussed the Enquirer's allegations, myself having been singled out by the Enquirer for being in possession of the same "stolen" material (which I used during my investigation of the National Enquirer for the October issue of Los Angeles magazine)
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