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Rod Serling

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NEWS
September 24, 1989 | DAVID GERMAIN, Associated Press
Witness a transformation: A witty boy growing up in an idyllic New York town in the 1930s becomes the master of macabre in television's Golden Age. He delivers packages for his father's butcher shop, captains the debating team, stars in plays, writes patriotic newspaper editorials. Graduation, 1942. He joins the paratroopers, is wounded in the Philippines. After college, he trades in his smile for a tight-lipped, somber look and becomes the spokesman for a bizarre dimension beyond imagination.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Before his death in 1975 at age 50, Rod Serling was one of the top Emmy Award-winning writers during the golden age of live TV drama of the 1950s, penning such acclaimed dramas as "Patterns," "Requiem for a Heavyweight" and "The Comedian. " In the 1960s he became a TV superstar as the host of his seminal CBS anthology series "The Twilight Zone.' In his prolific career, Serling also wrote such films as 1964's "Seven Days in May" and 1968's "Planet of the Apes. " He was also the host and frequent writer on the NBC anthology series "Night Gallery" in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
October 30, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for The Times
Theatre East is encouraging patrons to arrive in costume for the Halloween performance of their "lab" production, "Beyond the Cringe," which pairs one-acts by Katherine Long and David Campton. We'd recommend leaving the skeleton or "Alien 3" outfit at home and possibly donning a Rod Serling mask. Serling's shadow as the creator of "The Twilight Zone" looms large here, in good and not-so-good ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Robert J. Serling, one of the nation's top aviation writers and the author of the bestselling novel "The President's Plane Is Missing," has died. He was 92. Serling, the older brother of "Twilight Zone" creator Rod Serling, died May 6 in a hospice facility in Tucson, said his wife, Patricia Hoyer. He had been diagnosed with cancer five days earlier. A former award-winning aviation writer for United Press International, Serling became UPI's aviation editor in Washington, D.C., in 1960, the same year his first book, "The Probable Cause: The Truth About Air Travel Today," was published.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind; a journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. Next stop: "Rod Serling: The Twilight Zone and Beyond," a two-month celebration of the award-winning writer's television work, which kicks off today at the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1990 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
An almost legendary aura now surrounds "The Twilight Zone" and its creator, Rod Serling, and his widow says it's "a total surprise" to her, "as I'm sure it would have been to him." When KTLA Channel 5 presents its eighth annual Fourth of July "Twilight Zone Marathon" on Wednesday--13 consecutive hours of the classic series starting at 9 a.m.--it will be yet another example of the show's astonishing impact from one generation to another.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Before his death in 1975 at age 50, Rod Serling was one of the top Emmy Award-winning writers during the golden age of live TV drama of the 1950s, penning such acclaimed dramas as "Patterns," "Requiem for a Heavyweight" and "The Comedian. " In the 1960s he became a TV superstar as the host of his seminal CBS anthology series "The Twilight Zone.' In his prolific career, Serling also wrote such films as 1964's "Seven Days in May" and 1968's "Planet of the Apes. " He was also the host and frequent writer on the NBC anthology series "Night Gallery" in the early 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Robert J. Serling, one of the nation's top aviation writers and the author of the bestselling novel "The President's Plane Is Missing," has died. He was 92. Serling, the older brother of "Twilight Zone" creator Rod Serling, died May 6 in a hospice facility in Tucson, said his wife, Patricia Hoyer. He had been diagnosed with cancer five days earlier. A former award-winning aviation writer for United Press International, Serling became UPI's aviation editor in Washington, D.C., in 1960, the same year his first book, "The Probable Cause: The Truth About Air Travel Today," was published.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1990 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
An almost legendary aura now surrounds "The Twilight Zone" and its creator, Rod Serling, and his widow says it's "a total surprise" to her, "as I'm sure it would have been to him." When KTLA Channel 5 presents its eighth annual Fourth of July "Twilight Zone Marathon" today--13 consecutive hours of the classic series starting at 9 a.m.--it will be yet another example of the show's astonishing impact from one generation to another.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | SUSAN KING
"You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind; a journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. That's the signpost up ahead -- your next stop, the Twilight Zone." With those now-famous words, TV audiences 50 years ago were introduced to Rod Serling's breakthrough sci-fi series "The Twilight Zone." The series, essentially morality plays with evocative twists of fantasy, ran for five seasons on CBS -- and endlessly in reruns and the public imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2009 | SUSAN KING
"You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind; a journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. That's the signpost up ahead -- your next stop, the Twilight Zone." With those now-famous words, TV audiences 50 years ago were introduced to Rod Serling's breakthrough sci-fi series "The Twilight Zone." The series, essentially morality plays with evocative twists of fantasy, ran for five seasons on CBS -- and endlessly in reruns and the public imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2009 | Nick Owchar; Orli Low; Carolyn Kellogg
'Shadow and substance' What's the first thing you think about when you hear the words "The Twilight Zone"? Is it a man in a black suit with a cigarette? Or that cool, lawyerly voice: "Submitted, for your perusal: a Kanamit. Height: a little over 9 feet. Weight: in the neighborhood of 350 pounds. Origin: unknown . . ."? Rod Serling brought something new to television when the first episode of "The Twilight Zone" aired in October 1959. Some publishers have already celebrated the show's 50th anniversary: Douglas Brode's "Rod Serling and the Twilight Zone: The 50th Anniversary Tribute" (Barricade Books)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind; a journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. Next stop: "Rod Serling: The Twilight Zone and Beyond," a two-month celebration of the award-winning writer's television work, which kicks off today at the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Picture this: An anthology series featuring tales of mystery and terror--the host stares straight and steely eyed at the camera and delivers terse opening and closing commentary to each story. The setting seems familiar, but something's not quite right. Rather than a coat and tie, this host sports a tight black T-shirt, his muscled arms bulging and covered with tattoos. Rod Serling reincarnated in his own twilight zone? Nope.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he died of heart failure on a summer Saturday in 1975, Rod Serling was 50--five years shy of the age at which he had planned to retire and begin a life of uninterrupted rest and play. Still, as the most successful storyteller in the then-infant history of television drama, the twist at the end seemed tragically appropriate. He was a hard-working, heavy-smoking man with a sometimes vitriolic pen and a voice of pure velvet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1999 | DONALD LIEBENSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Submitted for your approval, a collection of oils and still-lifes that share one thing in common: You won't find them in the average salon or exhibition hall or art museum. Or, for now, in any video store. Mail order distributor Columbia House Video Library, under its "re-tv" banner, has just unveiled its exclusive 10-volume collection of original episodes from Rod Serling's 1970s anthology series, "Night Gallery." The introductory volume, available for $4.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Submitted for your approval: A birthday memorial to one Rod Serling, creator of a popular series in TV's childhood known as "The Twilight Zone." About 25 members of the Rod Serling Foundation got together in Binghamton, N.Y., Sunday evening--Serling would have been 64 on Sunday--to unveil a plaque in the Binghamton park where Serling set one of his more memorable episodes, "Walking Distance." Born in Syracuse, N.Y., Serling moved to Binghamton with his family when he was a child.
NEWS
December 9, 1990
Move over Cosby! The best show that ever graced the little screen was, without a doubt, "The Twilight Zone." Virtually every episode featured an Emmy-quality performance by its guest star integrated into an intriguing storyline with a suspenseful twist at the end. Add to that the superbly-rendered wraparounds by host-creator Rod Serling and you had an unbeatable combination of top-notch acting, plot and dialogue. Franklin R. Ruehl, Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Frustrated by the stage, Rod Serling turned to television to write his "plays," mostly for his series, "The Twilight Zone." Since then, the process has reversed, and a lot of playwrights have turned to Serling in creating their own "Twilight Zone" plays. The latest attempt is "Disconnect!" from John Beckman and Lee Clarke at the Chandler Studio Theatre. Just so we have our terms in order, let's be clear about what's meant by a "Twilight Zone" play.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1995 | Howard Rosenberg
"There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call . . . " * Howard Stern's underpants? No, "The Twilight Zone." More about Stern and his soilings shortly.
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