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Roddy Doyle

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December 29, 1996 | FRANCINE PROSE
Reading "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors," one almost can't helpmaking chilling comparisons between its tough, buoyant narrator and James Joyce's Molly Bloom. In his new novel, Roddy Doyle (author of "The Commitments" and "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha," winner of Britain's Booker Prize) has given us another powerfully memorable Irish woman soliloquizer.
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April 23, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
More than 25 years after Roddy Doyle wrote "The Commitments," the bestselling book-turned-movie is bound for London's West End. The scrappy story about a group of down-and-out Dubliners who form a soul band will open on Oct. 8 at the Palace Theatre. Doyle co-wrote the script for the 1991 movie of the same name, but was reluctant to adapt the story for the stage. PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage In part because of "The Commitments'” on-screen success, and until he saw "Jersey Boys,” the novelist, well, didn't care for musicals.
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BOOKS
September 20, 1992 | Tim Appelo, Appelo is a senior writer at Entertainment Weekly and a former fast-food chef at Willie's Wee-Nee Wagon in Seattle
Unlike the heroes of his first novel "The Commitments"--the Irish soul band now of motion-picture fame--Roddy Doyle has perfect pitch from the get-go. He can write pages of lifelike, impeccably profane dialogue without a false note nor a dull fill, economically evoking every lark and emotional plunge in the life of an entire Irish family. "The Van" is the third volume in a trilogy about the family Rabbitte. Lately, it's been mostly plunges for Jimmy Rabbitte, because Jimmy's out of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A Day in the Life of a Smiling Woman Complete Short Stories Margaret Drabble Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 215 pp., $24 Written over a period of 50 years, these stories reveal a great deal about a writer best known for her novels. Organized chronologically by publication year, from 1964 to 2000, the 14 stories describe (clearly without Margaret Drabble's intention to do so) three phases of a woman's life: youth, middle age and old age. In the first few stories, like "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" (written when the author was at Cambridge, but not published until 1968 after her reputation was established)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
In some language somewhere, there may be a more likable serious writer than Roddy Doyle, but you'd have to prove it to me. Since 1987, when he published "The Commitments" -- the first volume in his so-called Barrytown Trilogy -- the 49-year-old former schoolteacher from hardscrabble north-of-the-Liffey Dublin has written seven more novels, a work of nonfiction, three plays, screenplays and a trio of superb children's books.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1994 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roddy Doyle stood by the window of his 12th-floor hotel room and peered through the hard gray afternoon light at what he assumed to be the general direction of Los Angeles, conjuring his mythic picture of what the city 379 miles south looked like. "This is as close to L.A. as I want to get," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010
The Dead Republic A Novel Roddy Doyle Viking: 336 pp., $26.95
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
More than 25 years after Roddy Doyle wrote "The Commitments," the bestselling book-turned-movie is bound for London's West End. The scrappy story about a group of down-and-out Dubliners who form a soul band will open on Oct. 8 at the Palace Theatre. Doyle co-wrote the script for the 1991 movie of the same name, but was reluctant to adapt the story for the stage. PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage In part because of "The Commitments'” on-screen success, and until he saw "Jersey Boys,” the novelist, well, didn't care for musicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The ancient Irish believed a poet could kill with his satire. There's a memory of that belief in Roddy Doyle's deeply engaging comedic novels in which the poetry of everyday urban Irish speech is used to deal fatal blows against injustice and hurtful illusion. In his Barrytown Trilogy — "The Commitments," "The Snapper" and "The Van" — chronicling events in the life of the fictional Rabbitte clan, Doyle's brilliantly realized dialogue was hurled hilariously against the wall of social indifference with which contemporary Dubliners had surrounded the working-class neighborhoods and suburbs of their city's north side, where he has lived and taught for many years.
BOOKS
October 3, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
We know their dream; enough To know they dreamed and are dead; And what if excess of love Bewildered them till they died? I write it out in verse-- MacDonagh and MacBride And Connolly and Pearse Now and in time to be, Wherever green is worn, Are changed, changed utterly: A terrible beauty is born. -- William Butler Yeats, "Easter 1916" * The details, even the fuzzy outlines of Dublin on Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, may be as sketchy as dreams in the minds of most Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010
The Dead Republic A Novel Roddy Doyle Viking: 336 pp., $26.95
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The ancient Irish believed a poet could kill with his satire. There's a memory of that belief in Roddy Doyle's deeply engaging comedic novels in which the poetry of everyday urban Irish speech is used to deal fatal blows against injustice and hurtful illusion. In his Barrytown Trilogy — "The Commitments," "The Snapper" and "The Van" — chronicling events in the life of the fictional Rabbitte clan, Doyle's brilliantly realized dialogue was hurled hilariously against the wall of social indifference with which contemporary Dubliners had surrounded the working-class neighborhoods and suburbs of their city's north side, where he has lived and taught for many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
In some language somewhere, there may be a more likable serious writer than Roddy Doyle, but you'd have to prove it to me. Since 1987, when he published "The Commitments" -- the first volume in his so-called Barrytown Trilogy -- the 49-year-old former schoolteacher from hardscrabble north-of-the-Liffey Dublin has written seven more novels, a work of nonfiction, three plays, screenplays and a trio of superb children's books.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2007 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
"SHE copes. A lot of the time. Most of the time. She copes. And sometimes she doesn't. Cope. At all." So begins "Paula Spencer," Roddy Doyle's new novel about the heroine of "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors" (1996). We recognize Paula, a working-class Irishwoman, now 47, four months and five days past her last drink and holding on to sobriety for dear life.
BOOKS
November 7, 2004 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, the former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
To consciously set out on a trilogy is risky for a writer; the power may cut out along the way. Better, perhaps, to go book by book and see what turns up. Otherwise you can have a strong prequel with starveling sequels, a Chinese parade dragon with a lavish, fierce head and a straggling paper tail. Five years ago with "A Star Called Henry," Roddy Doyle launched a leveler's countermarch through the Irish heroic.
BOOKS
September 24, 2000
A PERFECT FRIEND By Reynolds Price; Jacket illustration by Maurice Sendak; Simon & Schuster/Atheneum: 128 pp., $16 In his first book for children, Reynolds Price pens a slow, dreamy story of a boy wrestling with grief over his mother's death. Ben Barks, now 11, and his mother used to spend hours drawing elephants and reading about them.
BOOKS
November 7, 2004 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, the former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
To consciously set out on a trilogy is risky for a writer; the power may cut out along the way. Better, perhaps, to go book by book and see what turns up. Otherwise you can have a strong prequel with starveling sequels, a Chinese parade dragon with a lavish, fierce head and a straggling paper tail. Five years ago with "A Star Called Henry," Roddy Doyle launched a leveler's countermarch through the Irish heroic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A Day in the Life of a Smiling Woman Complete Short Stories Margaret Drabble Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 215 pp., $24 Written over a period of 50 years, these stories reveal a great deal about a writer best known for her novels. Organized chronologically by publication year, from 1964 to 2000, the 14 stories describe (clearly without Margaret Drabble's intention to do so) three phases of a woman's life: youth, middle age and old age. In the first few stories, like "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" (written when the author was at Cambridge, but not published until 1968 after her reputation was established)
BOOKS
October 3, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
We know their dream; enough To know they dreamed and are dead; And what if excess of love Bewildered them till they died? I write it out in verse-- MacDonagh and MacBride And Connolly and Pearse Now and in time to be, Wherever green is worn, Are changed, changed utterly: A terrible beauty is born. -- William Butler Yeats, "Easter 1916" * The details, even the fuzzy outlines of Dublin on Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, may be as sketchy as dreams in the minds of most Americans.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | FRANCINE PROSE
Reading "The Woman Who Walked Into Doors," one almost can't helpmaking chilling comparisons between its tough, buoyant narrator and James Joyce's Molly Bloom. In his new novel, Roddy Doyle (author of "The Commitments" and "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha," winner of Britain's Booker Prize) has given us another powerfully memorable Irish woman soliloquizer.
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