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Roden Crater

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May 11, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - Flying a couple of thousand feet above a volcanic field in Arizona near the Painted Desert, it's fairly easy to spot the extinct volcano known as the Roden Crater. It stands alone in the field, apart from hundreds of other volcanoes. It shows signs of being a manmade monument, with paths winding around it, a small building with the horizontal thrust of a Neutra home embedded in one side and an entrance nearby. And down in the center of the crater's bowl, a 44-foot-wide concrete ring surrounds a large hole - looking up like a giant, unblinking eye. FULL COVERAGE: 2013 Spring arts preview You can imagine people thousands of years from now puzzling over its function, much the way people today wonder about Machu Picchu or Stonehenge.
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NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Los Angeles designer Jenni Kayne  knows how to live in style. She celebrated a decade of her fashion label Thursday night with a bash that brought together family, friends, fashion and art. The event was held at the new Kayne, Griffin, Corcoran Gallery on South La Brea, co-owned by Jenni's sister Maggie Kayne. Guests got to enjoy private time in the gallery's exhibition “James Turrell: Sooner Than Later, Roden Crater,” including taking in the “Skyspace” situated over a conference table and reclining chairs, and the kaleidoscopic two-person “Perceptual Cell” light show in a pod. (Kayne Griffin Corcoran and the Kayne Foundation are major sponsors of the blockbuster James Turrell restrospective at LACMA.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"James Turrell: A Retrospective" is a bit like a dinner party at which the guest of honor is absent. Family members and friends are there, plus lots of conversation about the one who's missing. But the primary impetus for the get-together couldn't make it. The missing guest, of course, is Roden Crater - the much written-about volcano in the Northern Arizona desert that the artist has been converting into an elaborate, celestial observatory since he located the dramatic site more than 40 years ago. The exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art includes extensive documentation of the ongoing project, in the form of models, drawings, plans, photographs and video.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
"Sooner Than Later, Roden Crater," the show filling Kayne Griffin Corcoran's handsome new space, is largely a cerebral affair, centered on James Turrell's 40-years-and-counting project to transform an extinct volcano in Arizona into a celestial observatory of sorts. His vision is diagrammed, described and accounted for through photographs, drawings, models, surveying tools and architectural plans, leaving, by necessity, the project's promised experiential effects to the imagination. The show (guest-curated by Richard Andrews of the Skystone Foundation)
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
LAS VEGAS -- A Louis Vuitton-commissioned James Turrell installation, which recently opened at the French luxury brand's City Center store here, is not only one of the most intimate and unexpected ways to experience the artist's oeuvre, it may just be the best antidote we've found yet to counteract the swirling, light-caused disconnectedness of Sin City chaos. Titled "Akhob," (a word from Egypt's Amarna period that means "pure water," according to a guide), the permanent installation, which opened on the fourth floor of the Louis Vuitton boutique last month, is the largest of Turrell's "ganzfeld" (light field)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's impossible not to use the word "visionary" when describing the work of James Turrell; that's one excuse. Here's another: Though the word is embarrassingly shopworn, when applied to Turrell it feels brand-new. Though Turrell's room-sized installations continue to startle viewers, he is best known for the Roden Crater project, located in an extinct volcano in Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Chris Barton
In a rare example of finding a meeting point between fine art and college athletics, the intramural sports field at Rice University will be retooling its lights during the next month in order to conflict less with a James Turrell Skyspace. The issue with the lights became apparent earlier this year when the field had to be closed to accommodate sunset shows at the university's Turrell Skyspace, which opened to the public in June. The piece uses the light of the sun to create two "shows" at sunrise and sunset that offer visitors a view of the sky on a large white roof over a grass berm through a 14-by-14 opening that changes colors depending on the sun's position.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Los Angeles designer Jenni Kayne  knows how to live in style. She celebrated a decade of her fashion label Thursday night with a bash that brought together family, friends, fashion and art. The event was held at the new Kayne, Griffin, Corcoran Gallery on South La Brea, co-owned by Jenni's sister Maggie Kayne. Guests got to enjoy private time in the gallery's exhibition “James Turrell: Sooner Than Later, Roden Crater,” including taking in the “Skyspace” situated over a conference table and reclining chairs, and the kaleidoscopic two-person “Perceptual Cell” light show in a pod. (Kayne Griffin Corcoran and the Kayne Foundation are major sponsors of the blockbuster James Turrell restrospective at LACMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
"Sooner Than Later, Roden Crater," the show filling Kayne Griffin Corcoran's handsome new space, is largely a cerebral affair, centered on James Turrell's 40-years-and-counting project to transform an extinct volcano in Arizona into a celestial observatory of sorts. His vision is diagrammed, described and accounted for through photographs, drawings, models, surveying tools and architectural plans, leaving, by necessity, the project's promised experiential effects to the imagination. The show (guest-curated by Richard Andrews of the Skystone Foundation)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
Exhibitions presenting the work of James Turrell and Manny Farber and an acoustic sculptural environment by Michael Brewster open at MOCA's Temporary Contemporary Nov. 13 to continue through Feb. 9. One of the most significant figures to emerge on the West Coast, Turrell has worked with light, space and perception since the 1960s. Although his installations have received national and international attention, this is Turrell's first major exhibition in Los Angeles since 1967.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
LAS VEGAS -- A Louis Vuitton-commissioned James Turrell installation, which recently opened at the French luxury brand's City Center store here, is not only one of the most intimate and unexpected ways to experience the artist's oeuvre, it may just be the best antidote we've found yet to counteract the swirling, light-caused disconnectedness of Sin City chaos. Titled "Akhob," (a word from Egypt's Amarna period that means "pure water," according to a guide), the permanent installation, which opened on the fourth floor of the Louis Vuitton boutique last month, is the largest of Turrell's "ganzfeld" (light field)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"James Turrell: A Retrospective" is a bit like a dinner party at which the guest of honor is absent. Family members and friends are there, plus lots of conversation about the one who's missing. But the primary impetus for the get-together couldn't make it. The missing guest, of course, is Roden Crater - the much written-about volcano in the Northern Arizona desert that the artist has been converting into an elaborate, celestial observatory since he located the dramatic site more than 40 years ago. The exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art includes extensive documentation of the ongoing project, in the form of models, drawings, plans, photographs and video.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. - Flying a couple of thousand feet above a volcanic field in Arizona near the Painted Desert, it's fairly easy to spot the extinct volcano known as the Roden Crater. It stands alone in the field, apart from hundreds of other volcanoes. It shows signs of being a manmade monument, with paths winding around it, a small building with the horizontal thrust of a Neutra home embedded in one side and an entrance nearby. And down in the center of the crater's bowl, a 44-foot-wide concrete ring surrounds a large hole - looking up like a giant, unblinking eye. FULL COVERAGE: 2013 Spring arts preview You can imagine people thousands of years from now puzzling over its function, much the way people today wonder about Machu Picchu or Stonehenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Chris Barton
In a rare example of finding a meeting point between fine art and college athletics, the intramural sports field at Rice University will be retooling its lights during the next month in order to conflict less with a James Turrell Skyspace. The issue with the lights became apparent earlier this year when the field had to be closed to accommodate sunset shows at the university's Turrell Skyspace, which opened to the public in June. The piece uses the light of the sun to create two "shows" at sunrise and sunset that offer visitors a view of the sky on a large white roof over a grass berm through a 14-by-14 opening that changes colors depending on the sun's position.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's impossible not to use the word "visionary" when describing the work of James Turrell; that's one excuse. Here's another: Though the word is embarrassingly shopworn, when applied to Turrell it feels brand-new. Though Turrell's room-sized installations continue to startle viewers, he is best known for the Roden Crater project, located in an extinct volcano in Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
Exhibitions presenting the work of James Turrell and Manny Farber and an acoustic sculptural environment by Michael Brewster open at MOCA's Temporary Contemporary Nov. 13 to continue through Feb. 9. One of the most significant figures to emerge on the West Coast, Turrell has worked with light, space and perception since the 1960s. Although his installations have received national and international attention, this is Turrell's first major exhibition in Los Angeles since 1967.
MAGAZINE
March 10, 2002
According to the article on James Turrell ("At Play With Night and Day in the Desert," by Wade Graham, Feb. 17), art is an expression of "faith in the possibility of liberation through a deep experience of the world." Really? Whose experience and whose world? Do we have to destroy the world to save it? What I see in Turrell is arrogance and hubris of the highest order. His $20-million Roden Crater project is an appalling desecration of nature and a waste of money. Is it a coincidence that it overlooks "the haunting expanses of the Painted Desert, adjacent to the Navajo and Hopi reservations"?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1985 | WILLIAM WILSON
A gallery at Temporary Contemporary is bare save a square of ghostly electric blue light hanging in a corner. At first it looks like a glowing window opening on a summer's day that is unnaturally bright even for Southern California. Then it transmogrifies and appears as a hovering cube that might be a high-tech Lucite light fixture, except that it clearly has no real physical substance and is thus most likely a celestial pod that will momentarily materialize as an angel of the Lord.
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