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Roderick Esquivel

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NEWS
October 27, 1987
Panamanian President Eric A. Delvalle met with senior military officials to discuss Vice President Roderick Esquivel's future, and a newspaper controlled by the powerful military charged that he has been spying for the United States. Esquivel, who has called Panama's lack of political freedoms "deplorable and depressing," did not attend the meeting. He has vowed that he will not resign, even though the government closed his offices last week and withdrew his bodyguards and car.
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NEWS
November 1, 1987 | From Reuters
U.S. Ambassador Arthur Davis, accused by Panama of meddling in its affairs, has returned to the United States for a vacation and consultations with the State Department, an embassy spokesman said Saturday. Davis has been involved in a dispute between Panama's military-backed government and its vice president, Roderick L. Esquivel, whose staff was fired and his offices closed while he was attending a conference in Nicaragua.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Despite a new ban on such demonstrations, anti-government protesters again paraded in automobile caravans Wednesday on the streets of Panama City. There were no signs that Panamanian police or military tried to stop the protests, which were held at noon and in the early evening and were similar to others that have become daily occurrences here.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Eric Arturo Delvalle today proclaimed he is still Panama's president, hours after the legislature voted to oust him for trying to fire the nation's military chief and de facto ruler, Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega. Delvalle called the move "legally despicable" and told reporters, "I am the president of Panama this morning." In a 10-minute session after midnight 38 legislators in the National Assembly voted Delvalle out of office and accused him of promoting U.S.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega accused the United States on Friday of instigating the failed effort to end his military rule and said Washington waged a campaign of "psychological warfare" against him. Eric Arturo Delvalle, ousted by the Legislature after trying to fire Noriega, refused to accept defeat and told reporters at his home, "I am the president of Panama this morning." He called later Friday for a national strike to repudiate Noriega's leadership.
NEWS
December 7, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Panama's military strongman, Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, is shoring up his rule with menacing and arbitrary actions that are radically--perhaps permanently--changing the country's political landscape. The steady move here--from what Latin Americans call a soft dictatorship to a hard one--has driven opponents of the military underground, into exile or into sullen silence.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
President Eric A. Delvalle, Panama's nominal civilian chief of state, was ousted early today after he tried and failed to fire controversial military strongman Manuel A. Noriega from his post as commander of the nation's Defense Forces. In a nationally televised announcement Thursday, Delvalle said that he had removed Gen. Noriega and replaced him with Col. Marcos Justine, chief of staff and second-in-command of the Defense Forces, this country's sole military and police organization.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The deposed president of Panama, Eric A. Delvalle, slipped away from his home and went into hiding Saturday, hours before the military here moved to order him into exile, U.S. and Panamanian sources said. Relatives and friends of Delvalle said that he secretly departed his ranch-style house near Panama City's financial district about midnight, eluding a military cordon that had been set up around his residence late Friday. In Washington, Juan B.
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