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Roderick M Hills

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BUSINESS
June 6, 1989
Oak Industries' shareholders will determine this morning if a management-backed majority on the company's board of directors should be replaced by a group of directors led by Roderick M. Hills, a Washington-based investment banker who has been waging an increasingly bitter proxy fight for control of the Rancho Bernardo-based company. The highly charged vote will take place during Oak's 10 a.m. annual meeting at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. Hills on Monday said that he was "comfortable" with preliminary results in the proxy fight.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Oak Industries director Roderick M. Hills on Wednesday wrested control of San Diego-based Oak from Chairman E. L. McNeely, after an official tally showed that Hills' slate won an overwhelming victory at the company's June 6 annual meeting. Hills' five-member slate won 77% of the 53.5 million votes cast during the emotionally charged annual meeting, while McNeely's slate drew just 23%, according to Oak General Counsel Jim Miller. In addition, three representatives of MIM Ltd., a British firm that owns 25% of Oak's shares, also were elected to the board by overwhelming margins.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Charges, countercharges and a possible court fight surfaced Friday in the increasingly bitter proxy fight that Washington-based merchant banker Roderick M. Hills is waging for control of Oak Industries. Oak Chairman E. L. McNeely on Friday initiated the latest exchange by insisting that Hills, a former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, has tried to mislead Oak shareholders about the San Diego-based company's financial health. McNeely branded Hills' proxy solicitation campaign a "public relations effort . . . (that)
BUSINESS
June 6, 1989
Oak Industries' shareholders will determine this morning if a management-backed majority on the company's board of directors should be replaced by a group of directors led by Roderick M. Hills, a Washington-based investment banker who has been waging an increasingly bitter proxy fight for control of the Rancho Bernardo-based company. The highly charged vote will take place during Oak's 10 a.m. annual meeting at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. Hills on Monday said that he was "comfortable" with preliminary results in the proxy fight.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Oak Industries director Roderick M. Hills on Wednesday wrested control of San Diego-based Oak from Chairman E. L. McNeely, after an official tally showed that Hills' slate won an overwhelming victory at the company's June 6 annual meeting. Hills' five-member slate won 77% of the 53.5 million votes cast during the emotionally charged annual meeting, while McNeely's slate drew just 23%, according to Oak General Counsel Jim Miller. In addition, three representatives of MIM Ltd., a British firm that owns 25% of Oak's shares, also were elected to the board by overwhelming margins.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Charges, countercharges and a possible court fight surfaced Friday in the increasingly bitter proxy fight that Washington-based merchant banker Roderick M. Hills is waging for control of Oak Industries. Oak Chairman E.L. McNeely Friday initiated the latest exchange by insisting in a press release that Hills, a former U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission chairman, has tried to mislead Oak shareholders about the financial health of the San Diego-based company. In a related action disclosed by Oak Friday, MIM Ltd., a British firm that is Oak's largest shareholder, has asked a Delaware judge to protect its right to vote for Hills' group of directors during Oak's annual meeting in San Diego Tuesday.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Roderick M. Hills, former Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, doesn't own a single share of Oak Industries. But that hasn't stopped Hills--along with former U. S. Atty. Gen. Elliott Richardson and San Diego businessmen Daniel Derbes and George W. Leisz--from initiating a proxy fight that would wrest control of Oak Industries from Chairman E. L. McNeely. Hills, the spouse of newly appointed U.S. trade representative Carla Hills, recently acknowledged in an interview that he might be "tilting at windmills" in the proxy fight that is scheduled to occur during Oak's June 6 annual meeting.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
A group that includes former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Roderick M. Hills, former U.S. Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson and San Diego Economic Development Corp. Chairman George W. Leiszhas begun a proxy fight aimed at unseating five of San Diego-based Oak Industries' eight board members. The dissident group will sponsor a board majority that would be "independent" of current Oak Chairman E. L. McNeely, according to a prepared release issued Tuesday by Hills.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1989 | Associated Press
Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. said today it has asked former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman John S. R. Shad to become chairman of the Wall Street giant, which is trying to rebound from a securities-fraud scandal raised by the SEC when Shad ran it more than two years ago. The nation's fifth-largest securities firm also said it had asked former SEC Chairman Roderick M. Hills to become a Drexel director.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter M. Hoffman, the former president and chief executive of Carolco Pictures Corp., has formed an entertainment company called CineVisions. The company will seek out business opportunities in emerging entertainment markets such as India, Indonesia and Eastern Europe. As chairman of CineVisions, Hoffman also will work as a financial consultant to the industry. He said he may even independently produce low-budget movies. CineVisions' backers include Canyons Partners Inc.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Charges, countercharges and a possible court fight surfaced Friday in the increasingly bitter proxy fight that Washington-based merchant banker Roderick M. Hills is waging for control of Oak Industries. Oak Chairman E.L. McNeely Friday initiated the latest exchange by insisting in a press release that Hills, a former U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission chairman, has tried to mislead Oak shareholders about the financial health of the San Diego-based company. In a related action disclosed by Oak Friday, MIM Ltd., a British firm that is Oak's largest shareholder, has asked a Delaware judge to protect its right to vote for Hills' group of directors during Oak's annual meeting in San Diego Tuesday.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Charges, countercharges and a possible court fight surfaced Friday in the increasingly bitter proxy fight that Washington-based merchant banker Roderick M. Hills is waging for control of Oak Industries. Oak Chairman E. L. McNeely on Friday initiated the latest exchange by insisting that Hills, a former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, has tried to mislead Oak shareholders about the San Diego-based company's financial health. McNeely branded Hills' proxy solicitation campaign a "public relations effort . . . (that)
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Roderick M. Hills, former Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, doesn't own a single share of Oak Industries. But that hasn't stopped Hills--along with former U. S. Atty. Gen. Elliott Richardson and San Diego businessmen Daniel Derbes and George W. Leisz--from initiating a proxy fight that would wrest control of Oak Industries from Chairman E. L. McNeely. Hills, the spouse of newly appointed U.S. trade representative Carla Hills, recently acknowledged in an interview that he might be "tilting at windmills" in the proxy fight that is scheduled to occur during Oak's June 6 annual meeting.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1985 | BILL RITTER
Former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Roderick M. Hills on Wednesday was elected a director of troubled Oak Industries. He replaces Frank A. Astrologes, Oak's executive vice president and chief financial officer, who resigned from the board and will retire at the end of July. Astrologes becomes the third high-ranking Oak executive to resign recently. Everitt A. (Nick) Carter resigned as chairman last November, and Raymond W. Peirce stepped down as president in March.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1990 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oak Industries plans to sell its only remaining business in California and move its headquarters to Boston, William Weaver, Oak's chief financial officer, said Tuesday. Oak's departure, which is planned for this summer, would further deplete the ranks of corporations with headquarters in San Diego. Oak's communications division has about 40 employees in San Diego. Its corporate staff was recently trimmed to 24 from about 35.
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