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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Roderick Mann, a British-born show business writer who interviewed many of the world's biggest stars during a more than 40-year career that included serving as an entertainment columnist for the Los Angeles Times, died early Friday morning. He was 87. Mann, who had been battling dementia and the early stages of Alzheimer's disease the last 14 months, died of cardiopulmonary arrest at an assisted-living facility in Studio City, said his wife, Anastasia Kostoff Mann. In a journalism career that began in the late 1940s after he served as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot in World War II, Mann was the syndicated entertainment feature writer for London's Daily and Sunday Express from the 1950s through the '80s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Roderick Mann, a British-born show business writer who interviewed many of the world's biggest stars during a more than 40-year career that included serving as an entertainment columnist for the Los Angeles Times, died early Friday morning. He was 87. Mann, who had been battling dementia and the early stages of Alzheimer's disease the last 14 months, died of cardiopulmonary arrest at an assisted-living facility in Studio City, said his wife, Anastasia Kostoff Mann. In a journalism career that began in the late 1940s after he served as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot in World War II, Mann was the syndicated entertainment feature writer for London's Daily and Sunday Express from the 1950s through the '80s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1986
"I'm using this film as a sort of audition," said Carrie Snodgress, "so the industry can see what I look like. People are always asking my agent, 'How is she?' 'Is she all right?' Well, the answer is yes." Fifteen years ago Snodgress won over the toughest critics with her performance in Frank and Eleanor Perry's "Diary of a Mad Housewife." With her husky voice and coldish manner, she was hailed as a new Margaret Sullavan and a possible successor to Carole Lombard.
TRAVEL
August 28, 1988
It is extraordinary that F. Woods would express dismay on behalf of his Toastmasters Travel Club regarding gorilla tracking (Readers' Letters, Aug. 14). Gorillas are indeed an endangered species; however, due to poachers, not organized tourism. It is only because of the efforts of Diane Fossey, her Digit Foundation, and the resulting controlled tourism that these magnificent animals have been spared extinction. As Roderick Mann's article (Aug. 7) pointed out, groups are limited to six people and very strict instructions are given on behavior, etc. Because of this limited tourism, for the first time ever, government officials of Rwanda and Zaire have taken an interest in their mountain gorillas and contributed to the effort to stop the horrendous poaching that is not only for frightful souvenirs (gorilla hands as ashtrays)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1985 | RODERICK MANN
"When I'm really depressed or frustrated about my work, I never go to see American movies--only foreign ones. Otherwise, I know I'll find myself staring at the screen and muttering, 'How did this guy get this junk made?' And that makes me more depressed and frustrated." Actor-writer Joseph Bologna doesn't smile as he says this--which makes it even funnier. For the truth is, he means it. "I get the same feeling if I happen to read the trades. I think, 'How did that idiot get such a deal?'
TRAVEL
August 21, 1988
Do send Roderick Mann out on more adventures. His account of the gorilla encounter (Aug. 7) was a thrilling piece of writing! MARIANNE RUUTH Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988
I was shocked upon reading in Roderick Mann's article about actors who have portrayed well-known stars in screen biographies that John Gavin portrayed Cary Grant in TV's "Poor Little Rich Girl" ("Nigel Havers Hopes His 'Balloon' Doesn't Burst," Jan. 24). In fact, it was James Read, who gave an excellent performance in that role. RICK MANDELL Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1985
An article about Sonia Braga with no mention of her week-nightly appearances on "Dancin' Days" on Channel 34 ("Sonia Braga: Bouquets for a Brazilian Bombshell," by Roderick Mann, Aug. 18)? You don't actually hear her as she wrestles with the problems of the moody Julia, since she (and everybody else) is dubbed into Spanish, but watching her is feast enough. PETER LARSEN Lake View Terrace
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1987
Thanks for the profile of Linda Hunt ("Busy Linda Hunt Views Arts--Androgynously," by Roderick Mann, March 1). While I'm sure we'll never see Hunt advertising "Eye on L.A." or "Two on the Town," she's got a style and character that sparkles right off the page. I look forward to "Waiting for the Moon" with great expectations. Hope Alice B. Toklas is the part we've all been waiting for since her Billy Kwan role in "Year of Living Dangerously." MICHAEL G. GUETZOW Woodland Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988
Thank you for the warm bon voyage from Roderick Mann ("It Was Great Fun, but It Was Just One of Those Things," March 6). He is one of the kindest gentlemen I have had the pleasure of working with and will be sorely missed. Roddy always had time for conversation and was always polite and kind when talking about my celebrity clients. If it's gorillas in Africa he wants to trek, then God bless him, but something tells me he'll be back. JIMMY DODSON Malibu
TRAVEL
August 21, 1988
Do send Roderick Mann out on more adventures. His account of the gorilla encounter (Aug. 7) was a thrilling piece of writing! MARIANNE RUUTH Los Angeles
TRAVEL
August 14, 1988
Having tracked gorillas in Rwanda in 1985, I was thrilled to see the picture of the silverback gorilla on the front page of the Travel Section. I immediately recognized him as one of the gorillas we encountered on our trip. (Each gorilla has a very distinctive face.) Roderick Mann's article was right on target. However, I would like to point out that Abercrombie & Kent is not the only tour operator with access to gorilla tracking permits. A good travel agent will be able to try a number of sources to obtain the permits.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988
Thank you for the warm bon voyage from Roderick Mann ("It Was Great Fun, but It Was Just One of Those Things," March 6). He is one of the kindest gentlemen I have had the pleasure of working with and will be sorely missed. Roddy always had time for conversation and was always polite and kind when talking about my celebrity clients. If it's gorillas in Africa he wants to trek, then God bless him, but something tells me he'll be back. JIMMY DODSON Malibu
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988
I was shocked upon reading in Roderick Mann's article about actors who have portrayed well-known stars in screen biographies that John Gavin portrayed Cary Grant in TV's "Poor Little Rich Girl" ("Nigel Havers Hopes His 'Balloon' Doesn't Burst," Jan. 24). In fact, it was James Read, who gave an excellent performance in that role. RICK MANDELL Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1987
I must take issue with Lawrence Christon's negative and patronizing (not to mention exploitive) attitude toward all of us here in Hollywood who are struggling actors ("So Many Actors, So Few Roles," Nov. 15). First of all, those of us who are well-trained, intelligent, realistic and serious about a career realize that it's a business--we do not need to be reminded of the low level of employment, or the generally condescending attitude of those administrative types we are forced to deal with every day (such as casting directors)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1987
Broeske begins to sound more and more like the Pretentious Prince himself (Roderick Mann). Insider's tidbits and muckraking a la Upton Sinclair should not be predetermining the fates of fine films such as "Ishtar." Broeske's catty style and gossipy digs are inappropriate and childish. Since when has a film's price-tag determined its quality? Since when does the acceptance of a film by Middle America determine its critical merit? Since when do professional journalists get away with comparing the work of proven masters in the industry like May, Beatty and Hoffman with that of trendy newcomers like Eddie Murphy?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1987
Broeske begins to sound more and more like the Pretentious Prince himself (Roderick Mann). Insider's tidbits and muckraking a la Upton Sinclair should not be predetermining the fates of fine films such as "Ishtar." Broeske's catty style and gossipy digs are inappropriate and childish. Since when has a film's price-tag determined its quality? Since when does the acceptance of a film by Middle America determine its critical merit? Since when do professional journalists get away with comparing the work of proven masters in the industry like May, Beatty and Hoffman with that of trendy newcomers like Eddie Murphy?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987
In his article on Ken Russell ("Where Russell Directs, Controversy Follows," April 19), Roderick Mann says that "just three months ago, he (Russell) directed 'Mephistopheles' in Genoa, Italy. . . ." The opera was undoubtedly "Mefistofele" by Boito. And, I'm quite sure that machismo had nothing to do with the reaction of the audience. They were probably outraged at Russell's staging of this great opera based on Goethe's immortal "Faust." As for Russell's remark that "they (the British critics)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987
In his article on Ken Russell ("Where Russell Directs, Controversy Follows," April 19), Roderick Mann says that "just three months ago, he (Russell) directed 'Mephistopheles' in Genoa, Italy. . . ." The opera was undoubtedly "Mefistofele" by Boito. And, I'm quite sure that machismo had nothing to do with the reaction of the audience. They were probably outraged at Russell's staging of this great opera based on Goethe's immortal "Faust." As for Russell's remark that "they (the British critics)
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