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Roderick Q Hickman

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OPINION
September 28, 2004
Roderick Q. Hickman, secretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, justified one aspect of the notorious "code of silence" that has hindered reporting on the current wave of prison scandals (letter, Sept. 23). Nearly a decade ago, the restrictions on interviews with individual prisoners were instituted unilaterally by the prison system. The California Department of Corrections has subsequently resisted every attempt to restore the system of news media interviews that had worked successfully for the preceding two decades and, indeed, had helped expose the rampant abuses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Surprised by the abrupt resignation Saturday of his corrections secretary, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Sunday said finding a new leader for the massive and dysfunctional prison system would not be easy. In a statement, Schwarzenegger praised the outgoing prisons chief, Roderick Q. Hickman, for performing "one of the toughest jobs in state government" and vowed to keep the correctional system "on the path toward change." The governor also named Jeanne S. Woodford acting secretary.
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OPINION
September 23, 2004
Re "Getting the Inside Story," editorial, Sept. 15: The Department of Corrections and the Department of the Youth Authority do not bar reporters from coming into state prisons or juvenile facilities. In fact we have invited reporters to come into our prisons and allowed them to randomly talk to any inmate on the yard or in the living units. A reporter can communicate with an inmate via the mail or telephone calls; in fact, that is how many of the stories printed in your publication and others are produced on an almost daily basis.
OPINION
September 28, 2004
Roderick Q. Hickman, secretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, justified one aspect of the notorious "code of silence" that has hindered reporting on the current wave of prison scandals (letter, Sept. 23). Nearly a decade ago, the restrictions on interviews with individual prisoners were instituted unilaterally by the prison system. The California Department of Corrections has subsequently resisted every attempt to restore the system of news media interviews that had worked successfully for the preceding two decades and, indeed, had helped expose the rampant abuses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2006 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Surprised by the abrupt resignation Saturday of his corrections secretary, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Sunday said finding a new leader for the massive and dysfunctional prison system would not be easy. In a statement, Schwarzenegger praised the outgoing prisons chief, Roderick Q. Hickman, for performing "one of the toughest jobs in state government" and vowed to keep the correctional system "on the path toward change." The governor also named Jeanne S. Woodford acting secretary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The family of slain Chino Institution for Men correctional officer Manuel Gonzalez has filed a $100-million federal lawsuit against California Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Roderick Q. Hickman and others for "deliberate indifference." Gonzalez, a 16-year veteran with the California Department of Corrections, was stabbed to death inside the prison Jan. 10. Gonzalez estate attorneys say prison administrators Hickman, California Department of Corrections Director Jeanne S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
Four months after severe security lapses led to the slaying of a prison guard, correctional officials will begin trying to ensure it doesn't happen again. A 10-member committee will be formed to develop safety procedures for California, said Youth and Adult Correctional Secretary Roderick Q. Hickman, who sought the review. The state Board of Corrections approved the committee Thursday, along with a nine-member panel to review employee safety at all 40 adult and youth prisons within 28 months.
OPINION
March 24, 2004
California's prison system fails to protect the taxpayers whose dollars it gobbles. Its repeat-offense rate is among the nation's highest. More than two-thirds of the state's prisoners commit a new crime or violate their parole within a few years of release.
OPINION
April 25, 2006
Re "Imprisoned by timidity ...," editorial, April 21 Your editorial missed an important point. You call the California Correctional Peace Officers Assn. "tyrannical" and falsely claim that we have "long fought nearly every effort at turning the state prison system into an organization that rehabilitates as well as punishes." In fact, we've pushed a number of key reforms over the years to improve the prison system, most of which were opposed by the Department of Corrections -- such as psychological screening for officers and programs that prepare inmates for life in the real world after their release.
OPINION
December 22, 2006
GOV. ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER unveiled a new prison blueprint Thursday that balances a building program with smart policies like the creation of a commission to review sentencing and parole guidelines. It's about time. We were beginning to worry that the California prison guards union was calling the shots. Not only does it enjoy great influence over state elections, it has apparently enjoyed veto power over the selection of prison managers -- including those overseeing contract negotiations.
OPINION
September 23, 2004
Re "Getting the Inside Story," editorial, Sept. 15: The Department of Corrections and the Department of the Youth Authority do not bar reporters from coming into state prisons or juvenile facilities. In fact we have invited reporters to come into our prisons and allowed them to randomly talk to any inmate on the yard or in the living units. A reporter can communicate with an inmate via the mail or telephone calls; in fact, that is how many of the stories printed in your publication and others are produced on an almost daily basis.
OPINION
January 7, 2004
Sens. Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough) and Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) plan to do something today that is unheard of in California: demand that leaders of the state's prison and parole system explain why California has a higher proportion of parolees who end up back behind bars than any other state. They'll ask how this can happen despite a massive prison building boom and a twelvefold corrections budget increase since 1980.
OPINION
May 4, 2005
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, perhaps trying to show that he's still a man of bipartisan consensus, held a news conference last week to celebrate the "fantastic" agreement he'd reached with legislators to transfer power from the adult Department of Corrections and the Youth Authority to a combined Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. It will be headed by current Youth and Adult Correctional Secretary Roderick Q. Hickman. The change, as state Sen.
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