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Rodger Kamenetz

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NEWS
April 2, 1995 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The jewel in the lotus" is a metaphorical image evoked in certain Buddhist chants, but the phrase turns into a comic but faintly discordant pun in the title of Rodger Kamenetz's book, "The Jew in the Lotus," a bit of wordplay intended to conjure up a dramatic but sometimes disturbing encounter between Judaism and Buddhism.
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BOOKS
August 17, 2003 | Rodger Kamenetz
When Gods were beginning to make the alphabet of heaven and earth, the wind ruffled the black waters and the earth had no name or form. We make impossible requests of fundamental texts searching in a vowel that dissolves as we penetrate. No name to pronounce, no form to see and the letters from aleph to tough ruffle like particles of ocean. We hover over waters created before the beginning, waters that spit up letters black as ink or thought.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Grande 4-Plex's "Documentary Days," composed of three films each screening one week, begins today with Laurel Chiten's beautiful and moving "The Jew in the Lotus." The film takes its title from a book written by Rodger Kamenetz on the spiritual rebirth he experienced when he accompanied a group of rabbis for a historical meeting with the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India. When Dr. Marc Lieberman, a Buddhist convert, organized the meeting, he invited Kamenetz to come along.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | NICK OWCHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miriam Kamenetz was a pent-up, volatile woman. Swinging between highs and lows, she loved her family fiercely, making the brick walls of their Baltimore home vibrate with her outpourings of emotion. As her son, Rodger, describes her in "Terra Infirma," she might have come straight out of a modern version of Euripides--the Medea of the suburbs.
BOOKS
August 17, 2003 | Rodger Kamenetz
When Gods were beginning to make the alphabet of heaven and earth, the wind ruffled the black waters and the earth had no name or form. We make impossible requests of fundamental texts searching in a vowel that dissolves as we penetrate. No name to pronounce, no form to see and the letters from aleph to tough ruffle like particles of ocean. We hover over waters created before the beginning, waters that spit up letters black as ink or thought.
NEWS
October 9, 1997 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he waits for Friday evening's sundown and the start of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement that ends the holiest season of the Jewish year, Rodger Kamenetz asks himself what it means to be Jewish. Since he is the director of Jewish studies at Louisiana State University, it seems fair to expect he already knows, but Kamenetz considers himself a work in progress, an "under constructionist" Jew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1999 | NICK OWCHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miriam Kamenetz was a pent-up, volatile woman. Swinging between highs and lows, she loved her family fiercely, making the brick walls of their Baltimore home vibrate with her outpourings of emotion. As her son, Rodger, describes her in "Terra Infirma," she might have come straight out of a modern version of Euripides--the Medea of the suburbs.
BOOKS
October 21, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Farther Shore A Novel Matthew Eck Milkweed Editions: 178 pp., $22 SIX soldiers are left behind enemy lines in a hostile city, the last battleground in a bloody war. Like players in a chess game, they must negotiate with tribesmen and warlords to rejoin their unit. It is a desolate landscape. The soldiers shoot several children in the darkness. In their dehydration, exhaustion and confusion, they kill and kill and kill. Every horrifying aspect of war is captured in Matthew Eck's spare prose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
His smiling visage appears as computer screen savers. His lectures sell out within minutes. His books have just made American publishing history when, for the first time, a religious leader landed two tomes on national bestseller lists at the same time. His Holiness Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet, perennially describes himself as just a "simple Buddhist monk."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Grande 4-Plex's "Documentary Days," composed of three films each screening one week, begins today with Laurel Chiten's beautiful and moving "The Jew in the Lotus." The film takes its title from a book written by Rodger Kamenetz on the spiritual rebirth he experienced when he accompanied a group of rabbis for a historical meeting with the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala, India. When Dr. Marc Lieberman, a Buddhist convert, organized the meeting, he invited Kamenetz to come along.
NEWS
October 9, 1997 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he waits for Friday evening's sundown and the start of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement that ends the holiest season of the Jewish year, Rodger Kamenetz asks himself what it means to be Jewish. Since he is the director of Jewish studies at Louisiana State University, it seems fair to expect he already knows, but Kamenetz considers himself a work in progress, an "under constructionist" Jew.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The jewel in the lotus" is a metaphorical image evoked in certain Buddhist chants, but the phrase turns into a comic but faintly discordant pun in the title of Rodger Kamenetz's book, "The Jew in the Lotus," a bit of wordplay intended to conjure up a dramatic but sometimes disturbing encounter between Judaism and Buddhism.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With almost no fanfare, the United States is experiencing its most dramatic religious transformation in this century. What has been a nation steeped in the Judeo-Christian tradition is fast becoming the most spiritually diverse country in the world. "More religions are being practiced in the United States than anyplace else," said Paul Griffiths, professor of philosophy of religions at the University of Chicago. At least 200 denominations coexist here, and the number continues to grow.
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