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Rodgers Hammerstein Organization

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September 3, 2008 | From Reuters
The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization is in talks with major music companies to sell its catalog of Broadway musical show tunes for between $150 million and $200 million, according to people familiar with the matter. EMI Music Publishing, Sony Corp's Sony/ATV Music Publishing, Vivendi's Universal Music Publishing and Warner/Chappell Music Publishing are all looking over the catalog, which includes songs from shows such as "The Sound of Music," "The King and I" and "South Pacific."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2008 | From Reuters
The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization is in talks with major music companies to sell its catalog of Broadway musical show tunes for between $150 million and $200 million, according to people familiar with the matter. EMI Music Publishing, Sony Corp's Sony/ATV Music Publishing, Vivendi's Universal Music Publishing and Warner/Chappell Music Publishing are all looking over the catalog, which includes songs from shows such as "The Sound of Music," "The King and I" and "South Pacific."
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NEWS
August 11, 2005 | Don Shirley
The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization is asking Justin Tanner to remove any elements from his play "Oklahomo!," now running in Burbank, that are derived from the musical "Oklahoma!" Tanner contends that the only two parts of the play that quote from "Oklahoma!" -- with altered lyrics -- are so brief that he hopes the organization's viewpoint will change after it receives a script that Tanner says is being sent. Bert Fink, a spokesman for Rodgers & Hammerstein, said the "Oklahomo!"
NEWS
August 11, 2005 | Don Shirley
The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization is asking Justin Tanner to remove any elements from his play "Oklahomo!," now running in Burbank, that are derived from the musical "Oklahoma!" Tanner contends that the only two parts of the play that quote from "Oklahoma!" -- with altered lyrics -- are so brief that he hopes the organization's viewpoint will change after it receives a script that Tanner says is being sent. Bert Fink, a spokesman for Rodgers & Hammerstein, said the "Oklahomo!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001
David Henry Hwang's deft burlesque version of Rodgers & Hammerstein's "Flower Drum Song," which I saw on opening night, may offer the right stuff to compete against more contemporary shows like "Cabaret" ("A Different Drummer," by Diane Haithman, Oct. 14). All it needs, perhaps, is a hefty dose of Disney's penny arcade showmanship. That would mean, of course, further enhancements--like maybe a couple of generic Elton John ballads to bolster box office. And while they're at it, why not drop some of those R&H numbers, which were so inelegantly forced into a reconfigured landscape?
BUSINESS
March 28, 1993 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It happens almost every time Bert Fink goes to a cocktail party. "When I say I work for Rodgers and Hammerstein, people invariably reply: 'I thought Rodgers and Hammerstein were dead,' " says Fink. They are--but they aren't. Although composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein died years ago, the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization lives on--50 years after the pair ushered in the era of modern musical theater with "Oklahoma!"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | Mike Boehm
HERE'S Gwen Stefani, giving her regards to Broadway again in the sincerest way: by swiping its songs. This time it's "The Lonely Goatherd," a sprightly tune from "The Sound of Music," which Stefani uses to sweeten her new rap-style single, "Wind it Up." Stefani, whose latest album, "The Sweet Escape," is due Dec. 5, sings a snippet of the Julie Andrews number, including yodels, and replicates some of its orchestration as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1997
Before PC, and before the Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization became so oddly insecure about the legacy and holdings of the two undisputed giants of American musical theater, there was a near-masterpiece made for television called "Cinderella" ("If the Slipper Fits . . . ," by Laurie Winer, Aug. 24). Those of us who enjoy lucky access to the original kinescope can marvel at so many wonderful moments. Among them, "Waltz for a Ball" is almost matchless in its inspired choreography--all the more wondrous given the small space it was staged in, and before live cameras.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2005
HERE are some notable -- and forgettable -- productions cited by Times reviewers and writers Philip Brandes, F. Kathleen Foley, Lynne Heffley, Daryl H. Miller, David C. Nichols, Don Shirley and James C. Taylor: The true-life controversy at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia provided ripe material for Thomas Gibbons' "Permanent Collection." This glimpse into the internal struggles at an art institution took on issues of race and cultural ownership.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1999 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is getting to know Rodgers and Hammerstein something young moviegoers want to do? The question could be answered as soon as this weekend when Warner Bros. releases "The King and I" as the first major Broadway musical to reach the big screen as an animated feature film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001
David Henry Hwang's deft burlesque version of Rodgers & Hammerstein's "Flower Drum Song," which I saw on opening night, may offer the right stuff to compete against more contemporary shows like "Cabaret" ("A Different Drummer," by Diane Haithman, Oct. 14). All it needs, perhaps, is a hefty dose of Disney's penny arcade showmanship. That would mean, of course, further enhancements--like maybe a couple of generic Elton John ballads to bolster box office. And while they're at it, why not drop some of those R&H numbers, which were so inelegantly forced into a reconfigured landscape?
BUSINESS
March 28, 1993 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It happens almost every time Bert Fink goes to a cocktail party. "When I say I work for Rodgers and Hammerstein, people invariably reply: 'I thought Rodgers and Hammerstein were dead,' " says Fink. They are--but they aren't. Although composer Richard Rodgers and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein died years ago, the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization lives on--50 years after the pair ushered in the era of modern musical theater with "Oklahoma!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
William Hammerstein, a director, producer and a fourth-generation member of one of the most prominent families in American theater, has died. He was 82. Hammerstein died at home Friday of complications from a stroke, said Theodore S. Chapin, president of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization. On Broadway, Hammerstein produced Neil Simon's first play, "Come Blow Your Horn," in 1961 and Garson Kanin's "A Gift of Time," starring Henry Fonda and Olivia de Havilland.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1991 | LIBBY SLATE
An ice skater? Yeah, but name one other 1980 Olympic champion blade man who was selected by the prestigious Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization to skate, act and sing as the prince in a production of the musical "Cinderella." And name another skater who has exhibited his oil paintings at Beverly Boulevard's trendy Nowhere Cafe. "I bore very easily," says figure skater Robin Cousins, from Bristol, England.
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