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Rodney Alexander

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NATIONAL
August 24, 2004 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
A Louisiana judge said Monday that Rep. Rodney Alexander had tried to manipulate the fall elections by switching to the Republican Party at the last moment and ordered state officials to reopen the ballot so new candidates could enter the race. Alexander, who represents a conservative, mostly rural stretch of northeastern and central Louisiana, caused a furor this month when he changed parties after filing as a Democrat.
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NATIONAL
August 24, 2004 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
A Louisiana judge said Monday that Rep. Rodney Alexander had tried to manipulate the fall elections by switching to the Republican Party at the last moment and ordered state officials to reopen the ballot so new candidates could enter the race. Alexander, who represents a conservative, mostly rural stretch of northeastern and central Louisiana, caused a furor this month when he changed parties after filing as a Democrat.
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NATIONAL
September 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Louisiana Supreme Court refused to knock a congressman off the Nov. 2 ballot for switching to the Republican Party. The justices gave no reason for their refusal to rule on the challenge to Rep. Rodney Alexander, a court spokeswoman said in Baton Rouge. The decision marks the end of an electoral saga that began Aug. 6, when Alexander switched from the Democratic to the Republican Party at the last minute.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A state appeals court ruled in Baton Rouge that a longtime Democratic congressman who switched to the Republican Party at the last minute may run as a GOP candidate, and overturned a lower-court decision that ordered the ballot reopened for new candidates. Rep. Rodney Alexander filed to run for reelection as a Democrat on Aug. 4, then refiled as a Republican two days later, just before the deadline to sign up for the race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1986
Rodney Alexander Pantages, son of the theater magnate, Alexander Pantages, died Tuesday at age 81 in Good Samaritan Hospital. Rodney Pantages managed the Hollywood Pantages Theater, which his father built in 1929, until the Pantages family sold it in 1949 to RKO Theatres. That sale marked the first time since the turn of the century that the Pantages family did not own a theater in Los Angeles. Since then, Pantages had been president of Shasta-Pan Oil Co.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
Rep. Rodney Alexander switched his party affiliation to Republican on Friday, making the surprise flip in the last minute of registration for the Nov. 2 ballot, virtually assuring the seat for the GOP. Alexander, who ran as a Democrat to win his first congressional term but voted along conservative lines, had remained a Democrat on Wednesday when he registered at the start of qualifying.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit seeking to remove U.S. Rep. Rodney Alexander from the November ballot because he switched to the Republican Party at the last minute was delayed Friday as lawyers wrangled over whether the case should be heard in state or federal court. Alexander stunned Democrats last week when he changed his party affiliation 15 minutes before the qualifying period for the Nov. 2 election was to end.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Rep. Jim Kolbe (R-Ariz.) confronted then-Rep. Mark Foley (R-Fla.) about his Internet communications with teenagers as early as 2000, according to a newspaper report. The Washington Post reported on its website Sunday night that a former page showed Kolbe some Internet messages from Foley that had made the page uncomfortable. Kolbe's press secretary, Korenna Cline, told the Post that a Kolbe staff member advised the page last week to discuss the matter with the clerk of the House.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2006 | Chuck Neubauer, Times Staff Writer
House Republicans knew for months that Rep. Mark Foley (R-Fla.) was exchanging what were described as "over-friendly" e-mails with a 16-year-old former House page, they acknowledged Saturday. Foley resigned Friday after news reports revealed that he had sent another male teenage former House page messages that were explicitly sexual. House leaders said they had not been aware of those messages.
OPINION
October 3, 2006
THE SCANDAL SURROUNDING disgraced Rep. Mark Foley (R-Fla.) is following the familiar Washington pattern, with one side (Democrats, in this case) alleging a coverup and the other (Republicans) railing about a setup. Even the affair itself has a familiar ring: It isn't the first sex scandal involving a congressman and teenage subordinates. What should not be missed amid the partisan sniping is the failure of those involved to see the red flags.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2006 | Noam N. Levey and Chuck Neubauer, Times Staff Writers
As pressure mounted on Republicans over their handling of the scandal involving former Rep. Mark Foley, the FBI said Sunday that it had begun a preliminary inquiry to determine whether the disgraced Florida lawmaker had violated federal law by sending sexually explicit instant messages to at least one teenager who had served as a congressional page. The FBI's brief statement confirming the inquiry came shortly after House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) sent a letter to Atty. Gen. Alberto R.
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