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Rodney Blonien

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NEWS
October 16, 1994
Rodney Blonien is a former corrections official who is Sacramento's most active lobbyist on behalf of companies, cities and associations with interests in California's prison system. He was second in command at the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency under Gov. George Deukmejian, leaving in 1987 to work for a law firm that represented Wall Street investment houses that underwrote bonds used to finance two California prisons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1996
Rodney Blonien's commentary, "Build Smarter Prisons for Soaring Inmate Population" (Aug. 15), is exactly what one would expect from a past undersecretary of the California Youth and Adult Correctional Agency. In fact, Blonien's article depicts exactly what advocates have been alleging for years, that the Department of Corrections is riddled with mismanagement that creates their own dependency and job security. His comment "we don't imprison enough" is indicative of their mentality. Likewise his comment that "for every 100 felons arrested in California for serious crimes, only eight receive prison time" is not only false but seriously misleading.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1996
Rodney Blonien's commentary, "Build Smarter Prisons for Soaring Inmate Population" (Aug. 15), is exactly what one would expect from a past undersecretary of the California Youth and Adult Correctional Agency. In fact, Blonien's article depicts exactly what advocates have been alleging for years, that the Department of Corrections is riddled with mismanagement that creates their own dependency and job security. His comment "we don't imprison enough" is indicative of their mentality. Likewise his comment that "for every 100 felons arrested in California for serious crimes, only eight receive prison time" is not only false but seriously misleading.
NEWS
October 16, 1994
Rodney Blonien is a former corrections official who is Sacramento's most active lobbyist on behalf of companies, cities and associations with interests in California's prison system. He was second in command at the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency under Gov. George Deukmejian, leaving in 1987 to work for a law firm that represented Wall Street investment houses that underwrote bonds used to finance two California prisons.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1987
Rodney J. Blonien, formerly undersecretary of California's Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, has been named a partner of the international law firm of Finley, Kumble, Wagner, Heine, Underberg, Manley, Myerson & Casey and will head the firm's Sacramento branch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1985
In a move dismissed by corrections officials as a negotiating ploy, the owner of the downtown Los Angeles site chosen for a new prison said Wednesday that the state will have to look elsewhere for a location. Llewellyn Werner, chairman of Crown Coach Corp., said the state has taken too long to reach agreement on the purchase of the school bus manufacturing firm's site east of the Civic Center. Werner added that he will consider offers from several other potential buyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1988
In an unexpected decision, the state Race Track Leasing Commission on Friday reopened the process of selecting a firm to receive the lucrative lease to operate the Del Mar Race Track. The commission postponed the much-awaited decision until late January to further study proposals from the Ogden-Nederlander group, operators of several East and Midwest race tracks; John Brunetti, owner of Florida's Hialeah Park; and the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club, the track's current operators.
NEWS
March 25, 1987
Rodney J. Blonien, undersecretary of the Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, who is generally credited with rescuing Gov. George Deukmejian's ambitious prison construction program from disarray, has resigned his post to join a private law firm, Deukmejian announced. The governor immediately named Chon Gutierrez, a long-time trouble-shooter for the Administration, to head up the $2.1-billion prison program, the largest in state history.
NEWS
February 27, 1985 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Three busloads of residents from the desert community of Blythe arrived at the Capitol Tuesday after an all-night trip to plead for something few towns want: a state prison. Nearly 140 townspeople trooped off the buses after traveling more than 600 miles to hold a rally on the west steps of the Capitol, the site of numerous protests over the years. Chanting "We want the prison," the weary travelers marched and carried signs with slogans such as "We Need Life in Blythe." Sen.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis on Tuesday appointed four members to the state Gambling Control Commission, a new body with wide-ranging authority over California's multibillion-dollar card club industry and some jurisdiction over Indian casinos. The appointees are John E. Hensley, 57, of Los Angeles; Arlo Smith, 72, of San Francisco; Michael C. Palmer, 51, of Los Angeles; and J.K. Sasaki, 51, of San Francisco. Hensley will chair the commission, which was born out of legislation by state Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1985
I must object to the characterization of my testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on March 19, as reported in The Times. Your paper indicates that I conceded "that an unwielding legal system--rather than political foot-dragging by the state Supreme Court--often is responsible for delays in reviewing death penalty cases." Your reporter missed my point. The legal delays in the unwielding legal system is due almost entirely to the confusion and uncertainty in the law due to the fact that numerous cases have been pending before the California Supreme Court for years.
NEWS
February 13, 1985 | WILLIAM ENDICOTT, Times Sacramento Bureau Chief
Gov. George Deukmejian said Tuesday that the opposition of organized labor and "some businesses" is thwarting his effort to use more California prison inmates for work that will help underwrite the cost of their imprisonment. "Simple fairness suggests that these criminals should start footing the growing bill for their support while they are in prison," Deukmejian said.
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