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Rodney Gilfry

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodney Gilfry has stripped to his skivvies as Rossini's Figaro and donned yellow wig and feathers as Mozart's Papageno, both roles seen here courtesy of the Los Angeles Music Center Opera. Tuesday, the strapping, handsome young baritone wore merely a stylish tuxedo when he sang a recital at Bridges Hall of Music at Pomona College.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2005 | Chris Pasles
THE handsome Prince Paul in Los Angeles Opera's new "Grand Duchess" is a familiar face. But there's something new about his name: When did Rodney Gilfry become Rod Gilfry? "I changed it about six months ago," Gilfry says. "Obviously I did it for the publicity, and it paid off because you're asking about it." No, seriously, folks. "I've always felt 'Rodney' was a little pretentious. I don't feel like 'Rodney.' 'Rodney' sounds sophisticated, and I don't feel so sophisticated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Aswirl in a black cape, Rodney Gilfry trounces onto the rehearsal scene, slams a money-filled satchel on the table before his seated adversary, Falstaff (Benjamin Luxon), then proceeds to vent his knuckle-biting fury. Gilfry is portraying Ford, the imaginary cuckold in Verdi's "Falstaff," which opens tonight at the Pavilion, courtesy of Music Center Opera. And he ends his rich-voiced monologue on a bench, quivering with impotent rage, reduced to a fit of paranoia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES
Gluck reformed opera by devoting a new "beautiful simplicity" entirely to the service of the drama. All this peaked in "Iphigenie en Tauride." Unfortunately, outside the theater and on the recording, long stretches of the refined score don't make a big impact. But from time to time, the music suddenly blossoms into something extraordinary. In the title role, Goerke is particularly glorious, soaring in "O malheureuse Iphigenie" and virtuosic in "Je t'implore et je tremble."
MAGAZINE
September 5, 1999 | JAMES RICCI, James Ricci is a Times staff writer. His last piece for the magazine was on World War I veterans
the tradition started in the opera houses of Italy. Just before the curtain goes up, one singer exhorts another, "In bocca al lupo!" "Into the mouth of the wolf!" "Crepi il lupo!" comes the reply. "Die, wolf!" This is not Italy, though. This is Zurich, where church bells bong and trams groan precisely on time, where clear-mindedness leaks from the stone faces of the banking houses and permeates the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
Rodney Gilfry relaxes in a chair on Los Angeles Music Center plaza. A showy succulent--an opening night gift for "Faust"--and a small black briefcase, complete with cel phone, sit at his feet. The baritone in surfer shades scans the facade of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, where he's sung many times. But these days his view has changed: After seven years abroad, it's his hometown house once again.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2005 | Chris Pasles
THE handsome Prince Paul in Los Angeles Opera's new "Grand Duchess" is a familiar face. But there's something new about his name: When did Rodney Gilfry become Rod Gilfry? "I changed it about six months ago," Gilfry says. "Obviously I did it for the publicity, and it paid off because you're asking about it." No, seriously, folks. "I've always felt 'Rodney' was a little pretentious. I don't feel like 'Rodney.' 'Rodney' sounds sophisticated, and I don't feel so sophisticated.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
The William Hall Chorale, augmented by a spiffy little orchestra, managed to meld Baroque sensibilities and the sheer volume of today's sonic allure in an exciting performance on Friday night of Handel's "Messiah." Performing in Pasadena Presbyterian Church, Hall had his 100-voice chorale scale down its massive output to manageable dynamic size, and the conductor's introduction of all manner of ornamentation was well executed by these forces.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A successful song recital is a miraculous balancing act that requires the gifts of a consummate artist and charismatic entertainer, a poet and a storyteller, an actor and a philosopher. Or, more simply, it requires the gifts of a Rodney Gilfry. The young American baritone has the complete package, as he demonstrated Monday at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts with pianist Grant Gershon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI
* The baritone plays the title character in Los Angeles Opera's "Billy Budd" Friday, Sunday and Wednesday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Goooooal!: My son is a soccer player on a really good club team. They're ranked sixth in the state. So on an ideal weekend we'd go to a good soccer match on Saturday. Usually we go to San Bernardino, but they can be as far away as Bakersfield or Ventura. They're amazingly good, and the level of play is astounding.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI
* The baritone plays the title character in Los Angeles Opera's "Billy Budd" Friday, Sunday and Wednesday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Goooooal!: My son is a soccer player on a really good club team. They're ranked sixth in the state. So on an ideal weekend we'd go to a good soccer match on Saturday. Usually we go to San Bernardino, but they can be as far away as Bakersfield or Ventura. They're amazingly good, and the level of play is astounding.
MAGAZINE
October 3, 1999
Thank you for "One Life, Two Worlds" (by James Ricci, Sept. 5), about baritone Rodney Gilfry. As one of his former professors at Cal State Fullerton, I could have predicted that he would be the kind of devoted parent and husband Ricci describes. Gilfry's enormous talent was obvious when he was a student in my piano classes. His steadfast determination as he struggled to get his long legs under the piano and his efforts to make his huge hands play gave me an early notion of his strong will to succeed.
MAGAZINE
September 5, 1999 | JAMES RICCI, James Ricci is a Times staff writer. His last piece for the magazine was on World War I veterans
the tradition started in the opera houses of Italy. Just before the curtain goes up, one singer exhorts another, "In bocca al lupo!" "Into the mouth of the wolf!" "Crepi il lupo!" comes the reply. "Die, wolf!" This is not Italy, though. This is Zurich, where church bells bong and trams groan precisely on time, where clear-mindedness leaks from the stone faces of the banking houses and permeates the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A successful song recital is a miraculous balancing act that requires the gifts of a consummate artist and charismatic entertainer, a poet and a storyteller, an actor and a philosopher. Or, more simply, it requires the gifts of a Rodney Gilfry. The young American baritone has the complete package, as he demonstrated Monday at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts with pianist Grant Gershon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
Rodney Gilfry relaxes in a chair on Los Angeles Music Center plaza. A showy succulent--an opening night gift for "Faust"--and a small black briefcase, complete with cel phone, sit at his feet. The baritone in surfer shades scans the facade of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, where he's sung many times. But these days his view has changed: After seven years abroad, it's his hometown house once again.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodney Gilfry has stripped to his skivvies as Rossini's Figaro and donned yellow wig and feathers as Mozart's Papageno, both roles seen here courtesy of the Los Angeles Music Center Opera. Tuesday, the strapping, handsome young baritone wore merely a stylish tuxedo when he sang a recital at Bridges Hall of Music at Pomona College.
MAGAZINE
October 3, 1999
Thank you for "One Life, Two Worlds" (by James Ricci, Sept. 5), about baritone Rodney Gilfry. As one of his former professors at Cal State Fullerton, I could have predicted that he would be the kind of devoted parent and husband Ricci describes. Gilfry's enormous talent was obvious when he was a student in my piano classes. His steadfast determination as he struggled to get his long legs under the piano and his efforts to make his huge hands play gave me an early notion of his strong will to succeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Aswirl in a black cape, Rodney Gilfry trounces onto the rehearsal scene, slams a money-filled satchel on the table before his seated adversary, Falstaff (Benjamin Luxon), then proceeds to vent his knuckle-biting fury. Gilfry is portraying Ford, the imaginary cuckold in Verdi's "Falstaff," which opens tonight at the Pavilion, courtesy of Music Center Opera. And he ends his rich-voiced monologue on a bench, quivering with impotent rage, reduced to a fit of paranoia.
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