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Rodney King Incident

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Rev. Jesse Jackson renewed his call Sunday for Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates to resign and urged the city to change its Charter so that "the civilian arm of government will have control over the military arm."
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 14, 2006
Re "Video, arrest report at odds," Nov. 11 The punching in this current incident of "police brutality" by LAPD officers and the "whacking by baton" in the Rodney King incident had their genesis more than 20 years ago, when the board of police commissioners outlawed the bar arm control. The bar arm was simple and effective. The officer got behind the suspect, took control and dropped the suspect to the ground to cuff him, while at the same time protecting against the loss of his weapon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arrests by police officers have dropped 16% in the San Fernando Valley since the videotaped beating of a black motorist by officers in Lake View Terrace plunged the Los Angeles Police Department into a crisis of public confidence. The statistics, tabulated by police in an effort to determine how the public uproar over the incident has affected officers' performance, include a 15% decrease in arrests in the Foothill Division, the patrol area where the March 3 beating occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2004 | Richard Winton, Jill Leovy and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
The televised beating of a suspected car thief Wednesday by a flashlight-wielding Los Angeles Police Department officer was described by a top department official as "Rodney King-esque," drawing comparisons with the 1991 beating of an African American man by LAPD officers that led to catastrophic riots a year later. Television news crews in helicopters recorded the early morning car chase that ended in Compton shortly before 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991
Chief Gates should resign. The Rodney King incident is just one more example of Daryliction of duty. WAYNE WILEY Huntington Beach
SPORTS
March 30, 1991
Hypocrisy enters into the vote to move the Super Bowl to Southern California in light of recently publicized racism in the area. The Rodney King "incident" has been given enough exposure that no one can be ignorant of it. What about a prominent African-American athlete being thrown to the floor at LAX because he "looked like a drug-runner" or another being arrested on the excuse that his auto registration was about to expire? Are the powers that be aware of how much Los Angeles has paid out for abuse of minorities?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1994
Although I am proud to have served 20 years of my life as a member of the Los Angeles Police Department, I am sad to say much has changed. Ever since the Rodney King incident, police officers are being forced to "lay back," and they cannot possibly effectively perform their duties for fear of being charged with abuse and discrimination. The vast majority of the men and women on the police force are forthright and dedicated public servants who have families to raise and must risk their lives to earn a living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Los Angeles school police officers who were fired for standing by and not intervening during the beating of Rodney G. King have been ordered reinstated by a school district commission. The commission rescinded the firings of Marc Diamond and Paul Beauregard after concluding that the officers were unjustly caught up in the community uproar over the King incident, officials said Monday. The commission acted during its meeting last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1991 | ROGER MAHONY, Roger Mahony is archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. A version of this article appears in the archdiocesan newspaper, the Tidings.
Until the video of the Rodney King incident appeared, I suspect that many people felt that police brutality was infrequent--and besides, "they probably deserved it anyway." That has all changed now. Police ruthlessness, even if just in a few isolated cases, is now real and present to all of us. As a caring society, how do we respond?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"L.A. Law" is working on an episode that examines what happens when the public begins to see police officers as a threat to their physical safety rather than as protection from crime and foul play. Developed before the March 3 beating of Rodney G. King by Los Angeles policemen that has sparked a national furor, the episode nonetheless includes lightly camouflaged references to it and other such reports of police brutality, according to David E. Kelley, executive producer of the law series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2002 | Patt Morrison
Give us a little credit, won't you? Isn't it possible we've learned something in 11 years? I speak of the Donovan Jackson matter in Inglewood, the videotaped incident of a 16-year-old black kid in handcuffs being slammed down on a police car and punched by a white police officer. It has been accompanied by protests and demonstrations, the deja vu street lullaby of "No justice, no peace." But what a difference a decade makes.
MAGAZINE
April 1, 2001
As an L.A. resident for the past 13 years, I have endured most of the events capsulized in Solomon Moore's piece ("Torn Between the Present and the Past," March 4). It is sobering to read about them, as he has condensed and analyzed them so thoroughly. What is most impressive is that Moore was able to remain objective and deliberate in his search for some type of solution, neither condemning nor propping up the victims or elitists of deep-seated racism. I will definitely watch for more of Moore's writing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1994
Although I am proud to have served 20 years of my life as a member of the Los Angeles Police Department, I am sad to say much has changed. Ever since the Rodney King incident, police officers are being forced to "lay back," and they cannot possibly effectively perform their duties for fear of being charged with abuse and discrimination. The vast majority of the men and women on the police force are forthright and dedicated public servants who have families to raise and must risk their lives to earn a living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black community in Orange County should get more involved in sparking change and pushing for social, economic and religious equality following the verdicts of four Los Angeles police officers accused of beating Rodney King, a panel of African-American leaders said Saturday. "The verdicts are over and the decision has been made," said Pastor Isaac L. Patrick, who organized the forum at the Gospel Light Church of God in Christ in Santa Ana. "My concern is: Where do we go from here?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an action that belatedly closes one of the many chapters in the Rodney G. King beating case, prosecutors declined Tuesday to pursue charges that King drove while intoxicated and tried to evade arrest before his fateful encounter with a group of Los Angeles police officers 22 months ago. In explaining the decision, recently elected Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti noted that the statute of limitations has run out on the drunk driving case.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | Compiled by Elston Carr , Times community correspondent
Kevin Haywood 31, South Los Angeles I was stopped on the 110 Freeway for speeding. I didn't know I was speeding, though. Actually I was in the middle of a little prayer for our city and I guess my foot just got a little heavy on the pedal. And then a motorcycle cop stopped me. The Rodney King incident didn't come into my mind. I was slightly afraid because I didn't know what he was stopping me for. The officer was nice. He wasn't mean or anything like that.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | Compiled by Elston Carr , Times community correspondent
Kevin Haywood 31, South Los Angeles I was stopped on the 110 Freeway for speeding. I didn't know I was speeding, though. Actually I was in the middle of a little prayer for our city and I guess my foot just got a little heavy on the pedal. And then a motorcycle cop stopped me. The Rodney King incident didn't come into my mind. I was slightly afraid because I didn't know what he was stopping me for. The officer was nice. He wasn't mean or anything like that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black community in Orange County should get more involved in sparking change and pushing for social, economic and religious equality following the verdicts of four Los Angeles police officers accused of beating Rodney King, a panel of African-American leaders said Saturday. "The verdicts are over and the decision has been made," said Pastor Isaac L. Patrick, who organized the forum at the Gospel Light Church of God in Christ in Santa Ana. "My concern is: Where do we go from here?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1992
On Oct. 4, an editorial appeared purporting to examine the issue of presidential leadership on civil rights under the following subheading: "Massive problems remain in unemployment, education and housing that rhetoric alone cannot hope to address." Unfortunately, the editorial, which called for stronger civil rights enforcement, focused on the rhetoric of this election season and gave scant attention to the actual record of the Bush Administration on civil rights enforcement. As assistant attorney general in charge of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, I can offer some hard facts on the department's positive civil rights enforcement record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A wave of retirements this year created openings in the detective commander's positions at four of the five Los Angeles police divisions in the San Fernando Valley, but Lt. Stella M. Mattson applied for only one: the job at Foothill Division. "People said, 'Why not apply for all four? It will improve your chances,' " Mattson said. "But I wanted Foothill Division. I took a gamble." And won. She took command of Foothill's 60-member detective squad last month.
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