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Rodney King Trial

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NEWS
September 24, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN
Given the endless armchair deliberations in magazines during the so-called Rodney King trial and the fury directed at the criminal justice system after it, it's odd that little attention has been focused on the verdict after things calmed down. In its last issue, American Lawyer stuck its neck out. In a detailed critique of the trial, Roger Parloff reluctantly conceded that he probably would have voted with the jurors. In the September issue, D. M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes the ball falls short, even for the Gipper. The Simi Valley City Council decided this week to pass on adopting "Home of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library" as the city's slogan. The move had been urged by Barbra Williamson, a council member who handles advertising and marketing for a local bank. "It's really too bad," she said. "It could've been the Nixon library, the Clinton library, the Franklin D. Roosevelt library--it really doesn't matter whose library it was.
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NEWS
June 7, 1992
I would like to thank all of the TV stations for their excellent and well-provided coverage of the L.A. riots. A special thanks to Fox television for airing the Rodney King trial. Fox did a superb job keeping us from fantasy and in touch with reality. Louisa Garcia, Paramount
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996
Trial proceedings began Tuesday at Alhambra Municipal Court in a spousal abuse case involving Rodney G. King and his estranged wife, Crystal, that stems from an alleged hit-and-run incident last year in Alhambra. King has found strange celebrity since the 1991 videotaped beating that led to state and federal trials, prison sentences for two police officers who were tried, and a $3.8-million civil judgment in his favor. And his fame became an issue at nearly every turn of the current case.
SPORTS
May 16, 1992
Those who are "outraged" by the comments of Byron Scott regarding the rioting have created an epic false dichotomy that seems typical of an audience truly ignorant of the anger that African Americans have felt for years. Because he did not condemn those creating the violence does not mean that he condones them. It seems that the people writing these letters, like the jurors in the Rodney King trial, do not have any desire to understand what is truly going on in L.A.; they would rather sit at home in their safe white neighborhoods watching their color TVs. BRIAN ROVNER San Diego
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1992
Mayor Tom Bradley should have said during the Rodney King trial that he was demanding a federal indictment of Los Angeles policemen for violating King's civil rights. The looting, burning and killing were worse because Bradley did not reassure the community that justice for blacks was available in Los Angeles. President Bush called for a federal investigation only after the King verdict triggered the rioting. The President's action came too late to prevent catastrophe. Neither social justice nor courtroom justice can exist without intelligent, caring and timely actions by our leaders.
OPINION
February 14, 1993
From the perspective of a foreign resident of the U.S., what is called the "Rodney King" trial is a most disturbing event. What I wonder, would those politically correct people who applaud this retrial think if the officers had been convicted--and the Justice Department was now intervening in the hope of getting them acquitted? There is also a disturbing duplicity about the expressed reasons for creating this new trial. If the original trial was considered by the Justice Department to be unsatisfactory, that can only be because of its verdict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1992
My name is Hadley and I am 11 years old. I am writing to talk about my feelings concerning the verdicts of the Rodney King trial. When I heard the words "not guilty," I became enraged. I continued to watch the news all evening and became completely informed about the situation. Then, an idea came into my head. I am sick and tired of being too young to do anything. Many people my age are educated in these situations and should be qualified to vote for what they believe in. Here is my idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1992 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the landmark Rodney King beating trial opens next week in Simi Valley, the 8-month-old Court TV channel will offer viewers a live, gavel-to-gavel, ringside seat. But Orange County--and most of Los Angeles--apparently will have to be satisfied with nightly newscast wrap-ups or CNN's on-again, off-again live coverage. Of several Orange County cable television systems contacted Tuesday, none reported plans to carry live coverage of the trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1992 | KAREN GRIGSBY BATES, Karen Grigsby Bates is a frequent contributor to The Times. and
Growing up in the 1950s, most elementary school children of all races were taught to respect authority, to salute the flag when it was presented to us, and to always know that if we found ourselves in trouble, if there was an emergency, "the policeman is your friend."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1993 | ROBIN RAUZI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Better late than never. L.A. Fiesta Broadway, normally a Cinco de Mayo celebration, will take over 36 blocks of downtown Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. The Fiesta was originally scheduled for April 25, but nine days before that the LAPD was on tactical alert as Los Angeles awaited verdicts in the Rodney G. King federal civil rights trial. In addition to general anxiety about potential civil unrest, the city couldn't spare the hundreds of police officers needed for security for such a large event.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eazy-E, the controversial Los Angeles rapper once accused of advocating violence against police officers, confirms that he believes in the innocence of one of the four officers on trial in the Rodney King case--shocking some members of the rap community. "What the cops did to Rodney King was wrong and the officers who beat him should be sent straight to prison," said Eazy-E, in his first formal interview since he began attending the trial almost daily.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | MARY ANNE PEREZ, Irene Fertik, 49, is the staff photographer for the University of Southern California and free-lances for City Times and other publications. She was called for the jury pool in the federal trial of the four officers accused of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights. She made it through several call-ins before being told that her panel, Panel 65, would not be chosen for duty. Fertik was interviewed by Mary Anne Perez.
The letter arrived in December and said: "Congratulations. You have been selected to be considered for a jury in a federal case that will last two months, sequestered, downtown." My sister read it and said: "This is the Rodney King trial." For two months, I was sort of preparing for this because I felt it was a chance of a lifetime, that maybe I would really get a chance to do something for my community, which I always try to do anyway with my photography.
OPINION
February 14, 1993
From the perspective of a foreign resident of the U.S., what is called the "Rodney King" trial is a most disturbing event. What I wonder, would those politically correct people who applaud this retrial think if the officers had been convicted--and the Justice Department was now intervening in the hope of getting them acquitted? There is also a disturbing duplicity about the expressed reasons for creating this new trial. If the original trial was considered by the Justice Department to be unsatisfactory, that can only be because of its verdict.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN
Given the endless armchair deliberations in magazines during the so-called Rodney King trial and the fury directed at the criminal justice system after it, it's odd that little attention has been focused on the verdict after things calmed down. In its last issue, American Lawyer stuck its neck out. In a detailed critique of the trial, Roger Parloff reluctantly conceded that he probably would have voted with the jurors. In the September issue, D. M.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN
It's a worrisome moment in American journalism when a writer feels he must whimper explanations before revealing his heartfelt beliefs, and then whine apologies afterward. But these are unusual times. Attorney Roger Parloff watched most of the so-called Rodney King trial, and he thinks, he says oh-so-hesitantly in the June issue of American Lawyer, that the jury probably reached the appropriate verdict.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN
It's a worrisome moment in American journalism when a writer feels he must whimper explanations before revealing his heartfelt beliefs, and then whine apologies afterward. But these are unusual times. Attorney Roger Parloff watched most of the so-called Rodney King trial, and he thinks, he says oh-so-hesitantly in the June issue of American Lawyer, that the jury probably reached the appropriate verdict.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | MARY ANNE PEREZ, Irene Fertik, 49, is the staff photographer for the University of Southern California and free-lances for City Times and other publications. She was called for the jury pool in the federal trial of the four officers accused of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights. She made it through several call-ins before being told that her panel, Panel 65, would not be chosen for duty. Fertik was interviewed by Mary Anne Perez.
The letter arrived in December and said: "Congratulations. You have been selected to be considered for a jury in a federal case that will last two months, sequestered, downtown." My sister read it and said: "This is the Rodney King trial." For two months, I was sort of preparing for this because I felt it was a chance of a lifetime, that maybe I would really get a chance to do something for my community, which I always try to do anyway with my photography.
NEWS
June 7, 1992
I would like to thank all of the TV stations for their excellent and well-provided coverage of the L.A. riots. A special thanks to Fox television for airing the Rodney King trial. Fox did a superb job keeping us from fantasy and in touch with reality. Louisa Garcia, Paramount
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1992
My name is Hadley and I am 11 years old. I am writing to talk about my feelings concerning the verdicts of the Rodney King trial. When I heard the words "not guilty," I became enraged. I continued to watch the news all evening and became completely informed about the situation. Then, an idea came into my head. I am sick and tired of being too young to do anything. Many people my age are educated in these situations and should be qualified to vote for what they believe in. Here is my idea.
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