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Rodolfo Acuna

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OPINION
March 28, 1993
The FOR (Friends of Rudy) ACUNA would like to make it clear that he is not alone in this struggle against the UC system. Our support committee was composed of leading labor, community and student activists who share Prof. Acuna's evaluation of the UC as an institution that is not serving the needs of Chicanos. CATHY OCHOA Granada Hills
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR.
For Rodolfo F. Acuna, being outspoken is a luxury that stems from his life as an educator. "It's an obligation," said the 64-year-old historian and political activist. "I look at it as being something that you take on. It's your vocation in life. You serve a function."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1996
Chicano studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who won $326,000 in an age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California, said Tuesday he will appeal a federal judge's decision to cut by about 80% the fees and expenses sought by his lawyers. Lawyers for Acuna, a longtime professor at Cal State Northridge, sought $2.4 million after he won his case against the university in 1995. U.S. District Judge Audrey B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1996
Chicano studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who won $326,000 in an age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California, said Tuesday he will appeal a federal judge's decision to cut by about 80% the fees and expenses sought by his lawyers. Lawyers for Acuna, a longtime professor at Cal State Northridge, sought $2.4 million after he won his case against the university in 1995. U.S. District Judge Audrey B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
Chicano studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who won $326,000 in an age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California, said Tuesday he will appeal a federal judge's decision to cut by about 80% the fees and expenses sought by his lawyers. The lawyers for Acuna, a longtime professor at Cal State Northridge, had sought $2.4 million after he won his case against the University of California in 1995. U.S. District Judge Audrey B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR.
For Rodolfo F. Acuna, being outspoken is a luxury that stems from his life as an educator. "It's an obligation," said the 64-year-old historian and political activist. "I look at it as being something that you take on. It's your vocation in life. You serve a function."
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK and ANTHONY OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. District Court jury found Monday that UC Santa Barbara had illegally rejected Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna, a pioneer in Chicano studies, for a senior teaching position at the university because he was too old. Outside the U.S. District Courthouse in Los Angeles, a jubilant Acuna, 63, was looking to hug anyone in sight, including reporters. He settled however for his family and attorney, Moises Vazquez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna filed a lawsuit against University of California officials Friday alleging that they conspired to deny him a job at UC Santa Barbara because of his political activism, his race and his age. Acuna, a founder of the Chicano studies field in the 1960s and an activist on behalf of Mexican-Americans, said UCSB officials illegally discriminated against him in 1991 when they turned down his application for a professor's job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired University of California historian, the highly regarded author of 13 books, praised the scholarship of Cal State Northridge professor and Chicano activist Rodolfo Acuna on Tuesday, saying UC Santa Barbara should have hired him. Testifying in U.S.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent legal victory by Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna in his age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California not only vindicated a prominent figure in Chicano studies but underscored a provocative debate about the evolving field and its future course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
Chicano studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who won $326,000 in an age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California, said Tuesday he will appeal a federal judge's decision to cut by about 80% the fees and expenses sought by his lawyers. The lawyers for Acuna, a longtime professor at Cal State Northridge, had sought $2.4 million after he won his case against the University of California in 1995. U.S. District Judge Audrey B.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent legal victory by Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna in his age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California not only vindicated a prominent figure in Chicano studies but underscored a provocative debate about the evolving field and its future course.
NEWS
October 31, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK and ANTHONY OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. District Court jury found Monday that UC Santa Barbara had illegally rejected Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna, a pioneer in Chicano studies, for a senior teaching position at the university because he was too old. Outside the U.S. District Courthouse in Los Angeles, a jubilant Acuna, 63, was looking to hug anyone in sight, including reporters. He settled however for his family and attorney, Moises Vazquez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired University of California historian, the highly regarded author of 13 books, praised the scholarship of Cal State Northridge professor and Chicano activist Rodolfo Acuna on Tuesday, saying UC Santa Barbara should have hired him. Testifying in U.S.
OPINION
March 28, 1993
I would like to tie up some loose ends in the George Ramos column "In This Fight Rudy Acuna Has All Angles Covered," March 22. Acuna was called "a polemicist and pamphleteer" by an all-white UC Santa Barbara faculty review committee that had no expertise in the field of Chicano studies. The university committee ignored external peer evaluations, mostly by Chicano scholars, who evaluated Acuna as a leader in the field of Chicano studies. Acuna is a respected scholar who is generally criticized by those who are ignorant of Chicano history, or those who want to deny that injustice has been commonplace in American history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna filed a lawsuit against University of California officials Friday alleging that they conspired to deny him a job at UC Santa Barbara because of his political activism, his race and his age. Acuna, a founder of the Chicano studies field in the 1960s and an activist on behalf of Mexican-Americans, said UCSB officials illegally discriminated against him in 1991 when they turned down his application for a professor's job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1990 | RODOLFO ACUNA, Rodolfo Acuna is a professor of Chicano studies at Cal State Northridge.
The political enemies of the late U.S. Sen. Joseph Montoya of New Mexico once published a list of his relatives who were on the public payroll. They thought they had scored a direct hit. But rather than embarrass the patriarch, the list demonstrated to his New Mexican constituents what a good man Montoya was--he took care of his family. As a rule, Latino politicians in Los Angeles don't put members of their political families--longtime aides as well as relatives--on the public payroll.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1992 | RODOLFO F. ACUNA, Rodolfo F. Acuna is a professor of Chicano studies at Cal State Northridge.
It is getting increasingly difficult to explain to Latinos that it is in their best interest to support the Democratic Party. For years, Latinos waited for the party to make them equal partners in its mythical coalition of ethnics and progressives, forged by Franklin Delano Roosevelt. They had high hopes in 1960 when the Viva Kennedy!
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