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Rodolfo Aguinaldo

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NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A fired provincial governor who seized a Philippine hotel in a brief, bloody revolt surrendered after 100 days in hiding. Rodolfo Aguinaldo said he will fight rebellion charges. About 1,000 backers gave him a hero's welcome in Tuguegarao, capital of Cagayan province, 210 miles north of Manila. Last March 4, Aguinaldo and armed supporters occupied a Tuguegarao hotel.
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NEWS
June 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A fired provincial governor who seized a Philippine hotel in a brief, bloody revolt surrendered after 100 days in hiding. Rodolfo Aguinaldo said he will fight rebellion charges. About 1,000 backers gave him a hero's welcome in Tuguegarao, capital of Cagayan province, 210 miles north of Manila. Last March 4, Aguinaldo and armed supporters occupied a Tuguegarao hotel.
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NEWS
January 27, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bonfires of burning tires lit the night sky, and scowling guards armed with assault rifles checked everyone who entered Rodolfo Aguinaldo's bunker-like concrete command center--surrounded by a 12-foot-high barbed wire fence. Inside, President Corazon Aquino's latest nightmare was holding court. "I'm a pain in the everything," Aguinaldo told visitors with a grin. "In Manila, they get constipated every time they think of me."
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long criticized as weak and feckless, President Corazon Aquino has demonstrated unexpected toughness against her foes in recent days and appears to have gained much-needed sympathy after a failed mini-rebellion Sunday in northern Luzon left a popular general dead. But diplomats and analysts here say the beleaguered Philippine leader may pay a heavy political price for her sudden boldness against alleged coup plotters.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major new crisis loomed Sunday for President Corazon Aquino's struggling administration after Philippine troops battled a renegade governor's heavily armed supporters in northern Luzon and a senior military official was shot to death.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long criticized as weak and feckless, President Corazon Aquino has demonstrated unexpected toughness against her foes in recent days and appears to have gained much-needed sympathy after a failed mini-rebellion Sunday in northern Luzon left a popular general dead. But diplomats and analysts here say the beleaguered Philippine leader may pay a heavy political price for her sudden boldness against alleged coup plotters.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Communist rebels killed 21 soldiers and wounded five others Wednesday in one of a series of attacks aimed at capitalizing on the crisis in the government's armed forces after last Friday's aborted coup, military authorities in Manila said Thursday.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Sen. Juan Ponce Enrile, the former defense minister who played a key role in Corazon Aquino's presidential victory, was arrested today for allegedly supporting last year's bid to topple her. The opposition denounced the arrest as an attempt to quash dissent, and military dissidents claimed that the move was a prelude to martial law. Enrile, one of Aquino's most vocal critics, was among seven people indicted for "rebellion with murder" in connection with the bloody Dec.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Corazon Aquino's government arrested Sen. Juan Ponce Enrile, a key opposition leader, inside the Philippine Senate late Tuesday on a charge of rebellion and murder stemming from the December coup attempt that nearly toppled Aquino's government. Enrile, a co-leader of the 1986 military revolt that helped catapult Aquino to power, was charged with causing the death of a boy killed by a rebel plane on the first day of the bloody Dec. 1-9 military uprising.
OPINION
March 11, 1990 | Vyvyan Tenorio, Vyvyan Tenorio is a Filipino-American journalist based in Manila
Watching events unfold in the Philippines is like watching a never-ending political sitcom. Last December a coup attempt left a lasting image of President Corazon Aquino besieged yet again by rightist rebels, while crowds hooted and cheered like basketball fans. "Surrender or die!" she said. But the rebels retreated, after signaling a timeout. A prominent opposition senator arrested for rebellion and murder becomes a star.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major new crisis loomed Sunday for President Corazon Aquino's struggling administration after Philippine troops battled a renegade governor's heavily armed supporters in northern Luzon and a senior military official was shot to death.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bonfires of burning tires lit the night sky, and scowling guards armed with assault rifles checked everyone who entered Rodolfo Aguinaldo's bunker-like concrete command center--surrounded by a 12-foot-high barbed wire fence. Inside, President Corazon Aquino's latest nightmare was holding court. "I'm a pain in the everything," Aguinaldo told visitors with a grin. "In Manila, they get constipated every time they think of me."
NEWS
January 19, 1988 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Early returns in Monday's violence-marred local elections showed some candidates endorsed by President Corazon Aquino leading in gubernatorial and mayoral races, but others were losing badly to old-time political bosses in key contests in metropolitan Manila and the rural provinces.
OPINION
February 4, 1990 | Alfred W. McCoy, Alfred W. McCoy is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Manila's "Christmas coup" showed that the Philippines has not yet moved beyond the Marcos era--indeed, evidence indicates the coup was an attempt to restore the Marcos regime without Ferndinand E. Marcos. The late president built his political machine by transferring vast amounts of money from established businessmen to a claque of kin and courtiers called the "crony capitalists."
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