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Rodolfo Gonzalez Guevara

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NEWS
September 15, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Institutional Revolutionary Party's most outspoken dissident has resigned, asserting that a national assembly held this month was "a masquerade" that proved the ruling party is undemocratic and unwilling to separate from the government. Rodolfo Gonzalez Guevara's resignation is the biggest blow to the PRI, as the party is called, since leftist leader Cuauhtemoc Cardenas quit in October, 1987, to run as an opposition candidate for the presidency.
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NEWS
September 15, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Institutional Revolutionary Party's most outspoken dissident has resigned, asserting that a national assembly held this month was "a masquerade" that proved the ruling party is undemocratic and unwilling to separate from the government. Rodolfo Gonzalez Guevara's resignation is the biggest blow to the PRI, as the party is called, since leftist leader Cuauhtemoc Cardenas quit in October, 1987, to run as an opposition candidate for the presidency.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1990 | ADOLFO AGUILAR ZINSER, Adolfo Aguilar Zinser is a senior research fellow at the newly founded Center for the Study of the United States at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.
Mario Vargas Llosa, the Peruvian writer and recent presidential candidate, calls Mexico's current political regime the "perfect dictatorship." Speaking in Mexico City last August before a group of conservative intellectuals, he pointed out that Mexico's one-party system permits just enough criticism to serve its image but uses every available means to suppress criticism that challenges its permanence in power.
NEWS
November 11, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
"Modernization" has been the battle cry of Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party since it suffered an unprecedented upset in several states during last July's election for president and a new congress. President-elect Carlos Salinas de Gortari has called for reforms to make the party that has run Mexico for 60 years more democratic and more appealing in a new era of competitive politics.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On yet another eye-tingling, smoggy Friday in the continent's largest city, traffic has come to a screaming halt for blocks on Paseo de la Reforma, the main boulevard. Horns honk and pedestrians gawk as 500 or so chanting medical workers troop by with banners denouncing their contract offer from the government health care agency. This protest is only the latest in a series of marches that have become a daily occurrence in this chaotic city.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Long ignored in the bowl of Mexico's gulf coast, the tropical state that woke up to an oil boom 10 years ago once again finds itself in the limelight, this time because of a boom in opposition politics. Tabasco state will hold an election for governor today, the first since Mexico's July 6 presidential vote turned a leftist coalition into a powerful force in Mexico and pushed the president-elect to commit his ruling party to pluralism.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The last time a virtual president was assassinated in Mexico, the course of the country's political history was changed forever. The year was 1928. A religious fanatic, gaining access by impersonating a cartoonist, shot and killed President-elect Alvaro Obregon. To guarantee the ruling elite's hold on power in the wake of Obregon's murder, strongman Plutarco Elias Calles the next year decreed into existence the vast, all-consuming political party that has governed Mexico ever since.
MAGAZINE
November 25, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, Marjorie Miller, a Times staff writer, is the paper's Mexico City bureau chief
WAVING red-white-and-green placards, hundreds of patriotic supporters gather under a searing midday sun to welcome President Carlos Salinas de Gortari to Acapulco's Juan N. Alvarez International Airport. They are taxi drivers and government workers, housewives and street vendors, all chanting "PRI! PRI!"--the initials of the mighty Institutional Revolutionary Party that has ruled Mexico for more than six decades.
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