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Rodolfo Stange

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April 22, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Rodolfo Stange, chief of Chile's militarized national police, refused to resign when President Eduardo Frei asked him to early this month. When Stange later agreed to go on "vacation," the tense standoff was at least temporarily resolved. But the episode gave Frei, who took office in March, an early sample of troubles he may face as the second civilian president since the end of military rule in 1990.
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NEWS
April 22, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Rodolfo Stange, chief of Chile's militarized national police, refused to resign when President Eduardo Frei asked him to early this month. When Stange later agreed to go on "vacation," the tense standoff was at least temporarily resolved. But the episode gave Frei, who took office in March, an early sample of troubles he may face as the second civilian president since the end of military rule in 1990.
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NEWS
September 21, 1994 | Reuters
President Eduardo Frei fired the top-ranking Socialist in his government Tuesday in a Cabinet reshuffle aimed at sharpening his much-criticized political team. The entire 18-member Cabinet resigned at Frei's request early in the day to leave him free to form a new government after a series of political setbacks. Frei replaced only four ministers, but they included Interior Minister German Correa, the highest-ranking Socialist in Chile's fractious coalition government.
NEWS
August 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Lawyers reported that security agents arrested at least 12 members of the outlawed Communist Party on Sunday as the Chilean military government moved to quell a growing wave of protests. Hours later, riot policemen used clubs and tear gas to disperse hundreds of people who had gathered at a Santiago cemetery to lay wreaths at the graves of three Communists who, a judge has charged, were slain by officers of the national uniformed police force.
NEWS
August 4, 1985 | Associated Press
Shaken by a growing uproar over charges of police involvement in a triple political assassination, Chile's military regime bolstered security Saturday after warning that it will use "the most drastic measures" to keep public order. The day before, riot police battled angry demonstrators in Santiago for more than 10 hours. At least 13 people were wounded and 79 demonstrators arrested, according to the government.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | United Press International
Cracks appeared in Chile's ruling military junta this past week when one of its four members declared that he will withdraw to civilian life in 1989, once democracy is fully established. The announcement was a clear indication that Chile's erstwhile monolithic armed forces are divided on whether to back President Augusto Pinochet beyond that year.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The military government Wednesday decreed an end to all state-of-emergency measures for the first time since President Augusto Pinochet took power in a 1973 coup. The action was taken less than a week before Chile's military commanders meet to nominate a candidate, expected to be Pinochet himself, for a presidential referendum planned for October.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The nation's foremost senior generals meet today to nominate the sole presidential candidate in a yes-or-no plebiscite in which Chileans will decide whether they want eight more years of rule by the government that toppled their last elected president nearly 15 years ago. Although Gen. Augusto Pinochet's nomination is a virtual certainty, an atmosphere of tension and expectation surrounds the announcement. For the first time since the coup led by Pinochet on Sept.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Majestic music soars in the background as an announcer's voice intones, "Step by step, with love, we Chileans have been building Chile." Images of factories, farms and highways flash across the television screen, then the smiling face of President Augusto Pinochet beams forth. "Chile," the announcer says, "walks with firm steps toward national unity." The government TV spot, repeated day and night on all Chilean channels, looks like slick campaign propaganda.
NEWS
August 31, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Gen. Augusto Pinochet was nominated by the military Tuesday as the sole candidate in a presidential plebiscite, while a few blocks away hundreds of pro- and anti-Pinochet militants battled and riot police fired barrages of tear gas to break up protests. From the moment President Pinochet entered the nominating session at the Defense Ministry to the cheers of about 2,000 supporters, demonstrations against him began in nearby shopping streets.
NEWS
August 24, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
A jarring note has crept into President Augusto Pinochet's familiar themes of nationalism and anti-communism. On a speaking tour of southern Chile this week, Pinochet referred to rumors of an anti-government plot. "A coup?" Pinochet said. "By whom, I ask? By nobody. The only one who could rise up in rebellion would be I." His opponents found it significant that Pinochet would publicly acknowledge a whisper of instability that had swept Santiago a few days earlier.
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