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Rodolphe Streichenberger

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The architect of a controversial artificial reef off Newport Beach is striking back at state officials with a lawsuit, halting a planned California Coastal Commission vote next week that would force him to dismantle the underwater structure. The lawsuit against the commission and other state agencies is the latest twist in a long-running battle over the experimental marine habitat built by Rodolphe Streichenberger in 1988.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early on an overcast Saturday, Rudolphe Streichenberger dons scuba gear to check on his private reef. In contrast to the day, his mood is bright: He is returning to the scene of a crime that may turn out not to be illegal after all. Last year, Streichenberger sued the California Coastal Commission, which had ordered him to remove the 2-acre reef he and colleagues had built more than a decade ago off Newport Beach as an aquaculture venture.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1988 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Far from the maddening crush of summer bathers and boaters, Rodolphe Streichenberger's idea has quietly taken root in the waters off Newport Beach. About 300 yards from the Balboa Pier, some 30 to 60 feet below the ocean surface, dozens of plastic columns covered with brown kelp and clusters of mussels sway with the tide. Anchored in the sandy bottom by plastic rope, the columns--and the aquatic life they support--represent an encouraging start to what Streichenberger hopes someday will be a thriving forest of giant kelp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early on an overcast Saturday, Rudolphe Streichenberger dons scuba gear to check on his private reef. In contrast to the day, his mood is bright: He is returning to the scene of a crime that may turn out not to be illegal after all. Last year Streichenberger sued the California Coastal Commission, which had ordered him to remove the 2-acre reef he and colleagues built more than a decade ago off Newport Beach as an aquaculture venture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least twice a week, Rodolphe Streichenberger visits his own private ranch. * It is a fertile area, replete with plants and animals. It is also 40 feet underwater. And the most distinctive characteristic of the small plot just outside Balboa Peninsula is the presence of 1,500 used tires half-buried in sand. "This was a real desert," said Streichenberger, 65, a transplanted Frenchman and seasoned scuba diver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early on an overcast Saturday, Rudolphe Streichenberger dons scuba gear to check on his private reef. In contrast to the day, his mood is bright: He is returning to the scene of a crime that may turn out not to be illegal after all. Last year Streichenberger sued the California Coastal Commission, which had ordered him to remove the 2-acre reef he and colleagues built more than a decade ago off Newport Beach as an aquaculture venture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2001 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early on an overcast Saturday, Rudolphe Streichenberger dons scuba gear to check on his private reef. In contrast to the day, his mood is bright: He is returning to the scene of a crime that may turn out not to be illegal after all. Last year, Streichenberger sued the California Coastal Commission, which had ordered him to remove the 2-acre reef he and colleagues had built more than a decade ago off Newport Beach as an aquaculture venture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1996
The creator of an artificial reef made of old tires in Newport Beach was told Wednesday to return to the California Coastal Commission with more information about his controversial project. Rodolphe Streichenberger, who created the reef in 1988, had failed to get the proper coastal permit for his experiment on the ocean bottom off Balboa Pier.
OPINION
January 7, 2003
I was saddened to read about Rodolphe Streichenberger's misguided crusade to dump trash in our ocean as a noble David-versus-Goliath struggle (Jan. 3). This David is portrayed as "wanting only [a] sea solution." Although restoration of habitats in our coastal waters is important and noble, it is highly irresponsible to place old tires or plastic pipes into the ocean as substrates on which to grow kelp or other sea life. Our ocean has a natural substrate. It is called rock. If we place tires in our ocean to grow marine life, then what is next?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999
An outlawed artificial reef made of old tires and PVC pipe is bobbing on the ocean floor off the Balboa Pier as its creator tries one last time to persuade state regulators to spare the structure. Aquaculturist Rodolphe Streichenberger was denied a permit two years ago and never asked for one when the experimental reef was built in 1988, but he remains undeterred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The architect of a controversial artificial reef off Newport Beach is striking back at state officials with a lawsuit, halting a planned California Coastal Commission vote next week that would force him to dismantle the underwater structure. The lawsuit against the commission and other state agencies is the latest twist in a long-running battle over the experimental marine habitat built by Rodolphe Streichenberger in 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least twice a week, Rodolphe Streichenberger visits his own private ranch. * It is a fertile area, replete with plants and animals. It is also 40 feet underwater. And the most distinctive characteristic of the small plot just outside Balboa Peninsula is the presence of 1,500 used tires half-buried in sand. "This was a real desert," said Streichenberger, 65, a transplanted Frenchman and seasoned scuba diver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1988 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Far from the maddening crush of summer bathers and boaters, Rodolphe Streichenberger's idea has quietly taken root in the waters off Newport Beach. About 300 yards from the Balboa Pier, some 30 to 60 feet below the ocean surface, dozens of plastic columns covered with brown kelp and clusters of mussels sway with the tide. Anchored in the sandy bottom by plastic rope, the columns--and the aquatic life they support--represent an encouraging start to what Streichenberger hopes someday will be a thriving forest of giant kelp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1996 | H.G. REZA
The California Coastal Commission will hear an appeal today from a marine researcher who challenged an agency ruling that he needed a permit for an artificial reef he created 10 years ago off the Balboa Pier. Rodolphe Streichenberger built the reef of plastic jugs, PVC pipes, iron rods and used tires. Commission members want to know how many of these items are laying below the surface, where they are and why, agency spokesman Darryl Rance said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990 | LAURA MICHAELIS
It started more than three months ago. Volunteer divers working on a well-publicized scientific study in the water off the Balboa Peninsula found that some of the buoys used for the project had been cut loose. A few weeks later, tubular casings were found to be leaking at the bottom of the kelp beds the scientists had planted. Workers for the project thought they had made a mistake in designing the tubes or in placing them in the kelp.
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