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Rodrigo Garcia

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NEWS
October 13, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Though European writer-directors from Francois Truffaut to Ingmar Bergman to Federico Fellini have created memorable female protagonists in their films, it is unusual for a writer-director in American cinema to explore the world of women. One of the rare exceptions is Rodrigo Garcia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Yvonne Villarreal
The wails of an infant haunt much of the 13-minute YouTube clip. On the Internet's dominant video site, recordings of laughing babies, talking twin babies, roller-skating babies long have made for amusing, sure-fire click bait. This case of a crying newborn represents something entirely different: It's an attempt at groundbreaking original programming from the site. "Susanna" is a 12-part series starring "True Blood's" Anna Paquin as a new mother who develops acute postpartum depression and her struggles in caring for her child.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Becoming a parent is like falling in love — you can read about it, talk about it, worry about it … but nothing can fully prepare you for it. For an actress who hasn't been there, playing a woman who struggles to conceive, then finally adopts, then finds she might not be cut out for parenting was a special challenge. "Every mother told me you don't know until you're in it. 'You think you know, but you don't know.' Well, great. That's helpful. Basically, you're saying, 'Good luck, you're going to fail,' " says a laughing Kerry Washington, one of the stars of Rodrigo Garcia's drama "Mother and Child."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Becoming a parent is like falling in love — you can read about it, talk about it, worry about it … but nothing can fully prepare you for it. For an actress who hasn't been there, playing a woman who struggles to conceive, then finally adopts, then finds she might not be cut out for parenting was a special challenge. "Every mother told me you don't know until you're in it. 'You think you know, but you don't know.' Well, great. That's helpful. Basically, you're saying, 'Good luck, you're going to fail,' " says a laughing Kerry Washington, one of the stars of Rodrigo Garcia's drama "Mother and Child."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2000
Lorenza Mun~oz, in her article regarding MGM's decision not to distribute my film "Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her," states that "the buzz around the movie at this year's Cannes and Sundance film festivals did not help" ("Director Blasts Plan to Send Film to Cable," July 1). I will not discuss the merits or even existence of "buzz"--only a fool would do that. But I do want to remind Mun~oz (or perhaps inform her) that after the Sundance Film Festival, the Hollywood Reporter and Variety gave positive reviews to the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Yvonne Villarreal
The wails of an infant haunt much of the 13-minute YouTube clip. On the Internet's dominant video site, recordings of laughing babies, talking twin babies, roller-skating babies long have made for amusing, sure-fire click bait. This case of a crying newborn represents something entirely different: It's an attempt at groundbreaking original programming from the site. "Susanna" is a 12-part series starring "True Blood's" Anna Paquin as a new mother who develops acute postpartum depression and her struggles in caring for her child.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodrigo Garcia, the director of MGM's "Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her," lashed out at the studio Friday for its decision to release the film on cable television rather than in movie theaters. The film, whose cast includes Holly Hunter, Glenn Close, Calista Flockhart, Amy Brenneman and Cameron Diaz, was originally scheduled for theatrical release this summer. The date was subsequently pushed back to the fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her" is an exquisite, haunting drama that interweaves five vignettes about a group of women living in the San Fernando Valley. What the film doesn't contain are special effects, crazy teenage antics, rock video-style editing or car chases. So is there really any surprise that the film, which stars Glenn Close, Holly Hunter, Cameron Diaz, Kathy Baker, Calista Flockhart and Amy Brenneman, is premiering on cable television instead of a movie theater?
BUSINESS
April 8, 1990
I am disappointed that the March 6 "Southern California Job Market" centerfold portrait of the workplace did not mention the great opportunities for engineers. The National Science Foundation has recently published information showing that the future demand for engineers will not be met unless industry and education join in ventures to produce qualified engineers. RODRIGO GARCIA Chairman, L.A. County Economic Development Corp. Education Committee
NEWS
June 19, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Ten Tiny Love Stories Distinctive authorial authority distinguishes "Ten Tiny Love Stories" in its world premiere at the Marilyn Monroe Theatre. Rodrigo Garcia's monologue cycle about love found and lost reveals an original voice of exciting potential. Director Luis Alfaro, working with a fine design effort unified by Jose Lopez's lean lighting, invests the febrile material with deceptive simplicity. The six actresses are outstanding.
NEWS
October 13, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Though European writer-directors from Francois Truffaut to Ingmar Bergman to Federico Fellini have created memorable female protagonists in their films, it is unusual for a writer-director in American cinema to explore the world of women. One of the rare exceptions is Rodrigo Garcia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her" is an exquisite, haunting drama that interweaves five vignettes about a group of women living in the San Fernando Valley. What the film doesn't contain are special effects, crazy teenage antics, rock video-style editing or car chases. So is there really any surprise that the film, which stars Glenn Close, Holly Hunter, Cameron Diaz, Kathy Baker, Calista Flockhart and Amy Brenneman, is premiering on cable television instead of a movie theater?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2000
Lorenza Mun~oz, in her article regarding MGM's decision not to distribute my film "Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her," states that "the buzz around the movie at this year's Cannes and Sundance film festivals did not help" ("Director Blasts Plan to Send Film to Cable," July 1). I will not discuss the merits or even existence of "buzz"--only a fool would do that. But I do want to remind Mun~oz (or perhaps inform her) that after the Sundance Film Festival, the Hollywood Reporter and Variety gave positive reviews to the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodrigo Garcia, the director of MGM's "Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her," lashed out at the studio Friday for its decision to release the film on cable television rather than in movie theaters. The film, whose cast includes Holly Hunter, Glenn Close, Calista Flockhart, Amy Brenneman and Cameron Diaz, was originally scheduled for theatrical release this summer. The date was subsequently pushed back to the fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1998
Re "Polanco Urges Expansion of Board of Supervisors," Nov. 14: I believe it's a good idea to expand the Board of Supervisors, but any initiative should also include term limitations. Three terms would be more than enough for any supervisor to get things done. Perhaps even two. As it now exists, the board members usually stay until they resign due to health problems. The county should have a change of leadership from time to time in order to be able to compete economically with other regions throughout the nation.
OPINION
January 24, 1993
Houston's recommendation to deport illegal immigrants is inflammatory and clearly suggested for political gain. His statements serve no positive solution to immigration problems and are detrimental to healing the ethnic tensions that have surfaced after the Los Angeles riots. Multiethnic Los Angeles is in need of positive leadership to bring the citizens together for a common cause; not a continual barrage of bigot-based politics pitting citizens against those who cannot defend themselves.
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