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Rodrigo Medina

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WORLD
February 21, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
It seemed a run-of-the-mill prison riot, though one that left 44 inmates beaten or knifed to death. In fact, the violence on Sunday in northern Mexico served as cover for a massive jailbreak by members of the country's deadliest criminal gang, the Zetas. Authorities on Monday revealed that 30 Zetas henchmen escaped from the maximum-security prison in Apodaca during the brawl - with the apparent complicity of guards and possibly other top officials. The deadly violence underscored the abysmal condition of Mexican prisons, which are woefully overcrowded, rife with corruption and prone to high-profile escapes.
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WORLD
January 28, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Bodies found dumped in a well in northeastern Mexico may be those of the 18 musicians and staff of a band that went missing after a Thursday night performance, authorities said. The members of Kombo Kolombia were reported missing Friday by family members who said they lost contact with the group after it performed at a bar along a highway about 30 miles north of Monterrey, the capital of Nuevo Leon state. On Monday, Gov. Rodrigo Medina told reporters that early signs indicated the bodies discovered the day before in the community of Mina are probably the missing members of Kombo Kolombia.
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WORLD
January 28, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Bodies found dumped in a well in northeastern Mexico may be those of the 18 musicians and staff of a band that went missing after a Thursday night performance, authorities said. The members of Kombo Kolombia were reported missing Friday by family members who said they lost contact with the group after it performed at a bar along a highway about 30 miles north of Monterrey, the capital of Nuevo Leon state. On Monday, Gov. Rodrigo Medina told reporters that early signs indicated the bodies discovered the day before in the community of Mina are probably the missing members of Kombo Kolombia.
WORLD
February 21, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
It seemed a run-of-the-mill prison riot, though one that left 44 inmates beaten or knifed to death. In fact, the violence on Sunday in northern Mexico served as cover for a massive jailbreak by members of the country's deadliest criminal gang, the Zetas. Authorities on Monday revealed that 30 Zetas henchmen escaped from the maximum-security prison in Apodaca during the brawl - with the apparent complicity of guards and possibly other top officials. The deadly violence underscored the abysmal condition of Mexican prisons, which are woefully overcrowded, rife with corruption and prone to high-profile escapes.
WORLD
August 26, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Gunmen stormed a crowded casino in northern Mexico on Thursday and ignited a fire that trapped patrons inside, killing at least 53 people in what the nation's president called an "aberrant act of terror. " The attack on the Casino Royale was the latest bout of spectacular violence in Monterrey, an industrial hub that is Mexico's third-largest city. For more than a year, the city has been the setting for a brutal turf war between rival drug-trafficking gangs that at times have held gunfights on downtown streets in broad daylight.
WORLD
August 19, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Spiraling drug-war violence in Mexico's wealthiest region has claimed the life of a prominent mayor — kidnapped Sunday and found dead Wednesday — and prompted demands from panicked residents for army protection. Edelmiro Cavazos was mayor of Santiago, a picturesque tourist town near Monterrey, Mexico's third-largest city and an industrial hub. He was grabbed from his gated home late Sunday by at least 15 gunmen wearing uniforms of a defunct police agency who arrived in a convoy of sport-utility vehicles, with patrol lights flashing.
WORLD
August 29, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Public outrage continued to mount Monday in Mexico over last week's slaying by fire of 52 people in a popular casino as officials announced the arrest of five suspects. At least one of the detained men confessed that the attack in Monterrey was in response to the casino owners' refusal to pay protection money, said Rodrigo Medina, governor of the state of Nuevo Leon, where the affluent northern city is located. Medina said the suspects were working for the notorious Zetas drug cartel, which has been locked in a bloody battle with rival drug traffickers for control of northeastern Mexico.
WORLD
August 27, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The dead were mainly mothers and grandmothers, middle-aged women who routinely stopped by the Casino Royale for an afternoon game of bingo or a shot at the slot machines. At least 52 people were killed Thursday when armed men set fire to the gaming hall in a busy commercial center of Mexico's wealthiest city. The attack, carried out in broad daylight, was the deadliest to target Mexican civilians in nearly five years of bloody drug warfare. "Mexico has witnessed one of the most terrible acts of barbarism in memory," President Felipe Calderon said Friday as he declared three days of national mourning.
WORLD
July 25, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Forensic workers have recovered 51 bodies, some burned and mutilated, from a mass grave believed linked to Mexico's raging drug war, authorities said Saturday. The site near a trash dump in the northern border state of Nuevo Leon is the second-largest clandestine grave found in recent weeks. Nuevo Leon Gov. Rodrigo Medina said most of the dead were probably drug traffickers killed in fighting with rivals. But he acknowledged that the bodies had yet to be identified. "They could have been people linked to organized crime, [killed in]
WORLD
July 2, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Remnants of Hurricane Alex on Thursday raked northern Mexico with damaging winds and heavy rains, knocking out power to thousands of homes and causing floods that killed at least two people. Alex, which roared in from the Gulf of Mexico as a Category 2 hurricane, weakened to a tropical storm as it crossed the states of Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon into Mexico's northern interior. But high winds and torrential rain left much of the region without electricity or telephone service, forced schools to close and sent rivers over their banks in Monterrey, the capital of Nuevo Leon and Mexico's most important industrial city.
WORLD
August 29, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Public outrage continued to mount Monday in Mexico over last week's slaying by fire of 52 people in a popular casino as officials announced the arrest of five suspects. At least one of the detained men confessed that the attack in Monterrey was in response to the casino owners' refusal to pay protection money, said Rodrigo Medina, governor of the state of Nuevo Leon, where the affluent northern city is located. Medina said the suspects were working for the notorious Zetas drug cartel, which has been locked in a bloody battle with rival drug traffickers for control of northeastern Mexico.
WORLD
August 27, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The dead were mainly mothers and grandmothers, middle-aged women who routinely stopped by the Casino Royale for an afternoon game of bingo or a shot at the slot machines. At least 52 people were killed Thursday when armed men set fire to the gaming hall in a busy commercial center of Mexico's wealthiest city. The attack, carried out in broad daylight, was the deadliest to target Mexican civilians in nearly five years of bloody drug warfare. "Mexico has witnessed one of the most terrible acts of barbarism in memory," President Felipe Calderon said Friday as he declared three days of national mourning.
WORLD
August 26, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Gunmen stormed a crowded casino in northern Mexico on Thursday and ignited a fire that trapped patrons inside, killing at least 53 people in what the nation's president called an "aberrant act of terror. " The attack on the Casino Royale was the latest bout of spectacular violence in Monterrey, an industrial hub that is Mexico's third-largest city. For more than a year, the city has been the setting for a brutal turf war between rival drug-trafficking gangs that at times have held gunfights on downtown streets in broad daylight.
WORLD
August 19, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Spiraling drug-war violence in Mexico's wealthiest region has claimed the life of a prominent mayor — kidnapped Sunday and found dead Wednesday — and prompted demands from panicked residents for army protection. Edelmiro Cavazos was mayor of Santiago, a picturesque tourist town near Monterrey, Mexico's third-largest city and an industrial hub. He was grabbed from his gated home late Sunday by at least 15 gunmen wearing uniforms of a defunct police agency who arrived in a convoy of sport-utility vehicles, with patrol lights flashing.
WORLD
June 19, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood and Daniel Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
Police across Mexico have awakened in recent days to a bold new assignment: enforcing the law. The country's 31 governors and the mayor of Mexico City are leading an eight-day offensive aimed at lower-grade offenses that most irk ordinary Mexicans, like car thefts and muggings. The high-profile crackdown, which began Monday, is being touted as an unprecedented bid by state authorities across Mexico to join hands, if temporarily, against the nation's crime epidemic. The drive, named after the acronym of the governors' association, is called CONAGO 1, sounding more like a deep-space probe than a splashy hunt for bad guys.
WORLD
October 23, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MONTERREY, Mexico - It is one of those small, hopeful signs that this traumatized city may be awakening from the nightmare of Mexico's drug wars: Armando Alanis once again feels safe enough to stop off for a late-night nosh at Tacos Los Quiques, a beloved sidewalk food cart. "We couldn't have done this two years ago," Alanis, a 44-year-old poet, said recently as he chowed down on tacos gringas in the dim glow of inner-city streetlights. "It would be wrong not to recognize what we have regained.
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