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NEWS
May 14, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to expand more than two weeks of protests, students and dissidents gathered here today to pay homage to their dead and reiterate their political demands for the ouster of President Roh Tae Woo.
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NEWS
May 14, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to expand more than two weeks of protests, students and dissidents gathered here today to pay homage to their dead and reiterate their political demands for the ouster of President Roh Tae Woo.
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NEWS
May 26, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo urged Japan on Friday to open its markets to Korean goods, and he also warned that it must eliminate discrimination against its 700,000 Korean residents. Speaking in Parliament, Roh asked Japan to try to correct its "chronic trade imbalance" with South Korea using "similar determination" that it has shown in its efforts to open Japanese markets to the United States and Europe.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said Thursday that his talks next week with Mikhail S. Gorbachev will be aimed at helping to end hostility on the divided Korean Peninsula. Roh is scheduled to leave Sunday and meet with the Soviet president in San Francisco on Monday after Gorbachev ends summit talks with President Bush. Afterward, Roh is to meet Bush in Washington on Wednesday, the Yonhap news agency reported.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The opposition charges of massive voter fraud in Wednesday's presidential election ensure that victor Roh Tae Woo's promise to heal South Korea's political "wounds and pains" will not be easy to keep, whatever his intentions. While for some, the former general's surprise 1.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | JIM MANN and SARA FRITZ and JANICE ARKATOV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration and South Korea are for the first time apparently resigning themselves to the withdrawal of some U.S. troops from South Korea over the next few years. Congressional pressure and South Korea's increasing economic power and military capability make it all but certain that the Administration eventually will be required to reduce the number of U.S. troops in Korea below the current level of 43,000.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Potentially explosive testimony on the Kwangju uprising is scheduled to begin in the National Assembly today as former South Korean President Chun Doo Hwan remains locked in a tense stalemate with ruling party officials over demands that he apologize for alleged corruption and abuse of power and return disputed assets to the state. The nationally televised hearings are to be held before an Assembly committee investigating brutal military suppression of the 1980 citizens' uprising in Kwangju.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of Japan and South Korea staged an elaborate show of historical reflection--and Japanese contrition--on Thursday, making tense and carefully measured remarks aimed at putting an unhappy past behind the two East Asian neighbors. The occasion may go down in the history books as the "apology summit."
BUSINESS
December 7, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
President Roh Tae Woo has begun the process of dispersing power and decentralizing decision making, but the bureaucracy of South Korea has proven more resistant to change than expected. Some analysts had predicted that settlement of trade disputes and other issues would become more difficult as the Seoul government began to answer the more cumbersome demands of democracy.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo said Thursday that his talks next week with Mikhail S. Gorbachev will be aimed at helping to end hostility on the divided Korean Peninsula. Roh is scheduled to leave Sunday and meet with the Soviet president in San Francisco on Monday after Gorbachev ends summit talks with President Bush. Afterward, Roh is to meet Bush in Washington on Wednesday, the Yonhap news agency reported.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented event that will dramatize the far-reaching changes taking place among the nations of East Asia, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will meet with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo in San Francisco, U.S. officials and other sources said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo urged Japan on Friday to open its markets to Korean goods, and he also warned that it must eliminate discrimination against its 700,000 Korean residents. Speaking in Parliament, Roh asked Japan to try to correct its "chronic trade imbalance" with South Korea using "similar determination" that it has shown in its efforts to open Japanese markets to the United States and Europe.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the walls are handwritten posters like those on South Korea's college campuses. "President Roh Tae Woo! Roll up your sleeves and do something!" declared one of them. But this was a stockbroker's office in the fashionable Myongdong section of downtown Seoul. And the angry protesters were not students or workers, but a band of individual investors.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of Japan and South Korea staged an elaborate show of historical reflection--and Japanese contrition--on Thursday, making tense and carefully measured remarks aimed at putting an unhappy past behind the two East Asian neighbors. The occasion may go down in the history books as the "apology summit."
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | JIM MANN and SARA FRITZ and JANICE ARKATOV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration and South Korea are for the first time apparently resigning themselves to the withdrawal of some U.S. troops from South Korea over the next few years. Congressional pressure and South Korea's increasing economic power and military capability make it all but certain that the Administration eventually will be required to reduce the number of U.S. troops in Korea below the current level of 43,000.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | From Reuters
South Korean police battled hundreds of firebomb-throwing protesters in the streets of Kwangju on Wednesday during a visit to the southwestern city by President Roh Tae Woo. Television reports showed fierce fighting with riot-control squads firing repeated volleys of tear gas to quell the demonstrators. The president was unharmed.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented event that will dramatize the far-reaching changes taking place among the nations of East Asia, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will meet with South Korean President Roh Tae Woo in San Francisco, U.S. officials and other sources said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the walls are handwritten posters like those on South Korea's college campuses. "President Roh Tae Woo! Roll up your sleeves and do something!" declared one of them. But this was a stockbroker's office in the fashionable Myongdong section of downtown Seoul. And the angry protesters were not students or workers, but a band of individual investors.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
President Roh Tae Woo has begun the process of dispersing power and decentralizing decision making, but the bureaucracy of South Korea has proven more resistant to change than expected. Some analysts had predicted that settlement of trade disputes and other issues would become more difficult as the Seoul government began to answer the more cumbersome demands of democracy.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Potentially explosive testimony on the Kwangju uprising is scheduled to begin in the National Assembly today as former South Korean President Chun Doo Hwan remains locked in a tense stalemate with ruling party officials over demands that he apologize for alleged corruption and abuse of power and return disputed assets to the state. The nationally televised hearings are to be held before an Assembly committee investigating brutal military suppression of the 1980 citizens' uprising in Kwangju.
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